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Washington Senators Last Game - 1971 The Washington Senators' 71st and last season in the American League came to a sad and strange end on September 30, 1971. Some 14,000 disenchanted fans came to RFK stadium one last time to see the home team play the New York Yankees in a meaningless contest. Many brought along insulting and obscene banners denouncing team owner Bob Short who had announced the team was relocating to Texas for the 1972 season. Love was showered on the players, though. Even the most mediocre Senators were given hearty cheers when they first came to bat. The loudest ovation was saved for slugging fan favorite Frank Howard who responded with a home run. However, things began to turn ugly in the eighth inning just after the Senators had taken a 7-5 lead. Here's Shirley Povich's account of what happened as it appeared in the next day's Washington Post: "As if in sudden awareness that the end of major-league baseball in Washington was only one inning way, the mood hardened. 'We want Bob Short!' was the cry that picked up in loud and angry chorus, and it was the baying-fury sound of a lynch mob. Then a swarm of young kids, squirts who wouldn't know what it had meant to have a big-league team all these years, or what it would mean to lose one, flooded onto the field from all points of the stands. A public address announcement warned that the home team could forfeit the game unless the field was cleared, and pretty soon the game resumed. It got as far as two out in the ninth, the Senators' 7-5 lead intact, no Yankee on base, when one young rebel from the stands set off again. He grabbed first base and ran off with it. Some unbelievers, undaunted by the warning of forfeit, cheered, and from out of the stands poured hundreds, maybe a couple of thousand fans. They took over the infield, the outfield, grabbed off every base as a souvenir, tried to get the numbers and lights from the scoreboard or anything else removable, and by their numbers left police and the four umpires helpless to intervene. The mad scene on the field, with the athletes of both teams taking refuge in their dugouts, brought official announcement of Yankees 9, Senators 0, baseball's traditional forfeit count almost since Abner Doubleday notched the first baseball score on the handiest twig at Cooperstown. But by then the crowd-mood was philosophical, 'So what?' Or more accurately, 'So what the hell?' The Senators were finished, even if the ball game wasn't."
Tags: baseball  riot  1971  Washington  Senators 
Added: 16th January 2012
Views: 4761
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jill Kinmont 1936-2012 Jill Kinmont Boothe (February 16, 1936 February 9, 2012) was a former alpine ski racer who competed in the mid-1950s. Jill Kinmont grew up in Bishop, California, skiing and racing at Mammoth Mountain. In early 1955, she was the reigning U.S. national champion in the slalom, and a top prospect for a medal at the 1956 Winter Olympics in Cortina, Italy. While competing in the downhill at the Snow Cup in Alta, Utah on January 30, 1955, she suffered a near-fatal accident which resulted in paralysis from the neck down. It ironically occurred the same week that Kinmont, about two weeks shy of her 19th birthday, was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated dated January 31, 1955. After her rehabilitation, she went on to graduate from UCLA with a B.A. in German and earned a teaching credentials from the University of Washington. She had a long career as an educator first in Washington and then in Beverly Hills, California. She taught special education at Bishop Union Elementary School from 1975 to 1996 in her hometown of Bishop. She was an accomplished painter who had many exhibitions of her artwork. Kinmont was the subject of two movies: The Other Side of the Mountain in 1975, and The Other Side of the Mountain Part 2 in 1978. Both films starred Marilyn Hassett as Kinmont. Jill married trucker John Boothe in November 1976, and they made their home in Bishop until her death.
Tags: SI  jinx  Jill  Kinmont  skier 
Added: 13th February 2012
Views: 7310
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lauren Bacall and Harry Truman The photograph from February 1945, taken at the National Press Club in Washington, was considered almost scandalous in its day: Lauren Bacall, a sultry 20-year-old Hollywood newcomer, sits on a piano being played by Vice-President Harry Truman.
Tags: piano  Harry  Truman  Lauren  Bacall 
Added: 6th April 2012
Views: 5364
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Posted By: Lava1964
Shuttle Discovery last ride NASA Video of Discovery going to her final resting place at the Smithsonian. A sad day indeed.
Tags: Shuttle  Discovery  NASA  Fly  over  Washington 
Added: 18th April 2012
Views: 1328
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Posted By: Marty6697
Barry Bonds Asterisk Ball On August 7, 2007 at 8:51 PM PDT, Barry Bonds of the San Francisco Giants hit a 435-foot home run, the 756th of his MLB career. The pitch was delivered by Mike Bacsik of the Washington Nationals. The homer broke MLB's prestigious all-time career home run record, formerly held by Hank Aaron who had retired after the 1976 season. The pitch, the seventh of the at-bat, was hit into the right-center field bleachers. The fan who ended up with the ball was 22-year-old Matt Murphy from Queens, NY. Bonds, long suspected of steroid use, was hugely unpopular outside of San Francisco, and most fans perceived his home run record to be tainted. Murphy decided to sell the ball to the highest bidder and consigned it to an auction house on August 21. Bidding began on August 28 and closed with a winning bid of $752,467 on September 15 after a three-phase online auction. The highest bidder was fashion designer Marc Ecko who created a website and online poll to let baseball fans decide the fate of the ball. The overwhelming majority of the 10 million online voters preferred the ball be branded with an asterisk (to signify a debatable achievement) and donated to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY. Ecko agreed; that's where the ball can be found today. Upon hearing what Ecko intended to do with the ball, Bonds was incredulous. He said, "[Ecko] spent $750,000 on the ball and that's what he's doing with it? What he's doing is stupid." Similarly, the man who bought Bonds' record-tying 755th home run ball for more than $180,000 held a similar online poll to decide that ball's fate. By a 2:1 ratio, fans voted to smash the ball.
Tags: baseball  Barry  bonds  home  run  steroids 
Added: 21st May 2012
Views: 2172
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Posted By: Lava1964
Babe Ruth  - Final Game With Yankees This photo issued by Acme Newspictures on September 30, 1934, shows the immortal Babe Ruth exiting Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C. following the New York Yankees' final game of the 1934 season. Washington won 5-3 in a game that took just 80 minutes to play. Ruth went 0-for-3 at the plate but did score a run before being replaced by Myril Hoag in right field. Detroit won the American League pennant in 1934, so there would be no World Series farewell for Ruth. Ruth was honored at Griffith Stadium earlier that day with gifts and he announced his retirement from baseball before a crowd of about 15,000. (Before the 1935 season Ruth was convinced to return to the game by Boston Braves owner Judge Emil Fuchs. He only played a month before quitting the last-place Braves.) Ruth's departure from the Yankees was bitter and messy. His playing skills were obviously diminishing and Lou Gehrig was now the team's star attraction. After years of unsuccessfully lobbying for the managerial position with Yankees' owner Jacob Ruppert, Ruth had had enough. This photo shows a dejected Ruth, with his head down, making his exit outside the ballpark. A boy is shown trying to chase down the Babe for an autograph, but Ruth (who usually accommodated everyone) was in a foul mood and had no time to pen the lad's baseball. A policeman is gesturing with his hands to the kid with a "not-today-son" motion. Six days earlier, on Monday, September 24, 1934, Ruth made his final Yankee Stadium appearance as a player in New York's 5-0 loss to the Boston Red Sox. He was pulled early in the game from his right feld position. There were no special ceremonies to mark the occasion. Fewer than 2,000 fans attended the game.
Tags: baseball  Babe  Ruth  Yankees  photo 
Added: 22nd May 2012
Views: 3542
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lincoln Memorial - Robert E Lee Profile Ever since the dedication of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC in 1922, rumors have persisted that a likeness of the great Confederate general Robert E. Lee's profile was sneakily carved into Abe's wavy locks of hair. Those who agree point out what appears to be a nose protruding from the back of Lincoln's head, and noticeable facial features including a familiar Lee-like beard. Moreover, Lee's face would be looking directly toward his pre-Civil War home in Arlington, VA. The idea that sculptor Daniel Chester French might have secretly been a Confederate sympathizer is odd. French was born in New Hampshire in 1850 and was steeped in New England Yankeedom from birth onward. When he began work on the Memorial in 1914, there were still distinct regional animosities in the old northern and southern states regarding the Civil War, so it's difficult to fathom French being an admirer of Lee. The National Parks Service completely dismisses the idea of Lee's profile in the Memorial as merely an urban myth. Still, after seeing the angle of this photo, I'm not so sure I buy the NPS' denial...
Tags: secret  Lincoln  Memorial  Robert  E.  Lee 
Added: 29th May 2012
Views: 5051
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Posted By: Lava1964
Kenneth Washington Kenneth Washington is another Hogan's Heroes cast member who is still alive. Washington, now 65, played Corporal Richard Baker in the final season of Hogan's Heroes (1970-71). He effectively replaced Ivan Dixon (Sergeant James Kinchloe) who had left the cast after the show's fifth season. Baker assumed Kinchloe's role as the heroes' radio operator. During the show, no explanation was ever offered as to what happened to Kinchloe or how Baker became part of the heroes. That's kind of odd when Stalag 13 was supposedly an escape-proof POW camp! Perhaps CBS hoped nobody would notice the change!
Tags: Kenneth  Washington  Hogans  Heroes 
Added: 5th June 2012
Views: 3480
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Posted By: Lava1964
Whats My Line - Syndicated Years After a prime time run on CBS of more than 17 years (1950 to 1967), the popular panel show What's My Line? was resurrected by its creators as a syndicated program from 1968 to 1975. Beloved host John Daly was not interested in the hectic schedule of five shows per week (all done in one day), so Washington political reporter Wally Bruner was brought in as the new moderator. Classy Arlene Francis returned as a regular panelist. Bennett Cerf apppeared occasionally until his death in 1971. Soupy Sales became the regular male panelist. He proved to be an amusing and excellent game player who seemed to know every mystery guest no matter what field he/she happened to be in. The syndicated version was less refined than the CBS version. Games were deliberately shortened to allow the contestants to display their unusual occupations--something that almost never happened on the old version. Therefore if a contestant was a fire eater or a wine taster, there was invariably a demonstration of his/her talent. Bruner hosted WML for four years but admittedly was not fond of New York City nor the showbiz scene and was happy to bow out gracefully. Larry Blyden, best known as a Broadway actor, took over as moderator in 1972 for the show's last three seasons, and was much more comfortable hobnobbing with celebrities than Bruner was. Providing halfway decent mystery guests five shows per week proved to be a huge challenge. Executive producer Gil Fates charitably referred to some of the so-called celebrities as "owls" because often the studio audience and some of the panelists would quietly say "who?" when the mystery guest was not particularly famous. The final shows were taped just before Christmas in 1974 and aired throughout the spring of 1975. Towards the end, declining ratings and aging audience demographics made WML a tough sell to local TV stations. Blyden was slated to host Showoffs, another game show, when he was tragically killed in an auto accident while vacationing in Morocco in June 1975--which absolutely sealed the finish of WML. The syndicated WML simply faded away with none of the sentimental fanfare the CBS version had in its 1967 finale. In his book on the history of WML, Fates ruefully admits the last episode of the syndicated show was "a bomb." There have been no serious attempts to revive WML since 1975, although a retrospective program was made later that year--co-hosted by John Daly and Arlene Francis--to mark WML's 25 years on the air.
Tags: TV  syndicated  Whats  My  Line 
Added: 14th June 2012
Views: 2052
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jackie Evancho - Age 10 It's hard to believe that 10-year-old classical singer Jackie Evancho was merely the runner-up in America's Got Talent in 2010. Here she is at the end of that year performing in Washington, D.C. She sings O Mio Babbino Caro and Pie Jesu magnificently.
Tags: Jackie  Evancho  classical  singer  age  10 
Added: 25th March 2017
Views: 1186
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Posted By: Lava1964

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