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1970s Rit Dye ad Featuring Cheryl Tiegs and Tie Dyed Grooviness Tags: cheryl  tiegs      simplicity  patterns      rit  dye 
Added: 30th April 2009
Views: 1621
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Posted By: Teresa
Heard It Through The Grape Vine The Late Great Marvin Gaye 1980
Tags: Gooden 
Added: 30th April 2009
Views: 1306
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Posted By: Marty6697
Patricia Neal Passes at age 84 Patricia Neal, who won an Academy Award for 1963's "Hud" and then survived several strokes to continue acting, died on Sunday. She was 84. Neal had lung cancer and died at her home in Martha's Vineyard.
Tags:  
Added: 9th August 2010
Views: 1389
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Posted By: Old Fart
Niagara Falls Dries Up - 1848 The photo below is an aerial view of what Niagara Falls usually looks like. But for a period of about 40 hours on March 29-31, 1848 Niagara Falls stopped. No water flowed over the great cataract for the first time in recorded history. Not surprisngly people went a little nuts. Niagara Falls was already a big tourist attraction by 1848. Villages sprouted on both the U.S. and Canadian sides of the river to accommodate the sightseeing throngs. Residents also built waterwheels to harness the Niagara River’s power to run mills and drive machinery in factories. An American farmer out for a stroll shortly before midnight on March 29 was the first to notice something. Actually, he noticed the absence of something--the thundering roar of the falls. When he went to the river’s edge, he saw hardly any water. Came the dawn of March 30, people awoke to an unaccustomed silence. The mighty Niagara was a mere trickle. Mills and factories shut down because the waterwheels had stopped. The bed of the river was exposed. Fish died and turtles floundered about. Brave—or foolish— people walked on the river bottom, picking up exposed guns, bayonets and tomahawks as souvenirs. Was it the end of the world? Perhaps it was divine retribution for what some folks thought was a U.S. war of aggression against Mexico? In an age of religious revivals, theological explanations abounded. Fearing the end of the world, thousands of people filled special church services praying for the falls to start flowing and the world to continue, or for salvation and forgiveness of their sins as the Last Judgment approached. Because communications were haphazard in 1848, no one knew why the falls had stopped. But from Buffalo, NY word eventually arrived that explained the bare falls and dry riverbed. Strong southwest gale winds had pushed huge chunks of ice to the extreme northeastern tip of Lake Erie, blocking the lake’s outlet into the head of the Niagara River. The ice jam had become an ice dam. And just as news traveled inward, news also traveled outward. Thousands came from nearby cities and towns to look at the spectacle of Niagara Falls without water. People crossed the riverbed on foot, on horseback and in horse-drawn buggies. Mounted U.S. Army cavalry soldiers paraded up and down the empty Niagara River. It was a potentially hazardous act for there was no telling when the rushing waters might return. One entrepreneur used the hiatus to do some safety work. The Maid of the Mist sightseeing boat had been taking tourists on river rides below the falls since 1846, and there were some dangerous rocks it always had to avoid. Since the river had ceased running and the rocks were in plain sight, the boat’s owner sent workers out to blast the rocks away with explosives. March 30 was not the only dry day. No water flowed over the falls throughout the daylight hours of March 31. But that night a distant rumble came from upriver. The low-pitched noise drew nearer and louder. Suddenly a wall of water came roaring down the upper Niagara River and over the falls with a giant thunder. The ice jam had cleared. To the relief of the locals, the river was running again.
Tags: Niagara  Falls  dries  up  natural  history 
Added: 21st March 2011
Views: 3675
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rollergirls - 1978 Sitcom Flop In the late 1970s NBC couldn't seem to create a popular sitcom. Among the more spectacular flops was Rollergirls, which aired for a mere four episodes in the spring of 1978. The show centered on the Pittsburgh Pitts, an all-girl roller derby team. It was owned and managed by conniving Don Mitchell, a bargain-basement entrepreneur who was constantly looking for ways to save the foundering team. The Pitts were a sexy but sometimes inept crew: towering Mongo, feisty J.B., sophisticated Brooks, ditzy blonde Honey Bee, and innocent Pipeline (an Eskimo-American!). The announcer for the team's games was snobbish Howie Devine, a down-on-his-luck former opera commentator who would do anything for a buck. Rollergirls oddly operated on the premise that roller derby was on the level and was run as a legitimate pro sport--which most people over the age of 12 know to be untrue. Amazingly, viewers stayed away in droves.
Tags: Rollergirls  NBC  sitcom  flop  roller  derby 
Added: 18th August 2011
Views: 2556
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fictitious Past of Raymond Burr Raymond Burr, the popular Canadian-born actor who starred in both Perry Mason and Ironside, wildly fabricated parts of his past, presumably to hide his homosexuality. Most of the blatant falsehoods weren't exposed until after his death in 1993. Burr married actress Isabella Ward on January 10, 1949. They lived together for less than a year and divorced after four years. Neither remarried. At various times in his career, Burr or his managers offered biographical details that appear spurious or unverifiable. These include marriage to a Scottish actress named Annette Sutherland, supposedly killed in the same plane crash as Leslie Howard. A son named Michael Evan was said to have resulted from another invented marriage to Laura Andrina Morgan. Burr provided the only evidence of the boy's existence and death from leukemia at age 10. As late as 1991, Burr told Parade magazine that when he realized his son was dying, he took him on a one-year tour of the United States. He said, "Before my boy left, before his time was gone, I wanted him to see the beauty of his country and its people." Later research proved Burr was working in Hollywood throughout the year he was supposedly travelling with his ill son. Burr also claimed to have served in the U.S. Navy during the Second World War and said he had been seriously wounded on Okinawa. Many of these fictions were believed and widely reported during Burr's lifetime. In the mid 1950s, Burr met Robert Benevides, a young actor and Korean War veteran, on the set of Perry Mason. According to Benevides, they became a couple around 1960. He later became a production consultant for 21 of the Perry Mason TV movies. Together they owned and operated an orchid business and then a vineyard in the Dry Creek Valley. They were partners until Burr's death. Burr left Benevides his entire estate. Later accounts of Burr's life explain he hid his sexuality to protect his career. In 2000, AP reporter Bob Thomas recalled the situation: "It was an open secret...that Burr was gay. He had a companion who was with him all the time. That was a time in Hollywood history when homosexuality was not countenanced. Ray was not a romantic star by any means, but he was a very popular figure...If it was revealed at that time in Hollywood history [that he was gay] it would have been very difficult for him to continue."
Tags: Raymond  Burr  false  past 
Added: 18th September 2011
Views: 2430
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Posted By: Lava1964
Remains of George Mallory Found - 1999 Seventy-Five years after British mountaineer George Mallory vanished in June 1924 in his attempt to be the first man to scale Mount Everest, an expedition from National Geographic was organized to try to find his remains--along with those of his climbing colleague Andrew Irvine. The two were last seen alive about 800 meters from the summit. In 1979 a Chinese mountaineer reported to a Japanese climber that he had come across the remains of "an Englishman" during an ascent in 1975. The Chinese climber was killed in an avalanche the following day before he could give precise directions to the corpse. Going on the general location the Chinese climber had provided, the 1999 expedition covered a search area about the size of a dozen football fields. Sure enough, on May 1, 1999, Mallory's mummified corpse, sun bleached to an alabaster white, was discovered face down and fused to the mountain scree by American searcher Conrad Anker. ID tags on the clothing quickly confirmed the body was indeed Mallory's. Found in Mallory's possession was a letter from his brother and an unpaid bill Mallory owed to a London clothing shop. Mallory had several broken bones and a punctured skull, leading to speculation that he had severely injured himself in a sudden, violent fall and likely froze to death in a helpless state in a matter of minutes. Whether Mallory made it to Everest's summit or not is a matter of heated debate. Irvine's body has yet to be found. Warning: The clip is a little bit gruesome.
Tags: mountaineering  George  Mallory  corpse  discovery 
Added: 26th October 2014
Views: 1665
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tie A Yellow Ribbon - 1973 In 1972 songwriter Irwin Levine read a newspaper story about a prisoner who was overcome with angst as his pending release from jail drew nearer. He was deeply concerned that his wife would not want to remain married after his long absence from her. The prisoner, in advance of his release, asked his wife to provide a symbol of acceptance before he arrived home. Levine and co-writer L. Russell Brown took the story and turned it into one of the truly great songs from the 1970s: Tie A Yellow Ribbon (Round The Ole Oak Tree). It was recorded by Tony Orlando and Dawn, a group which hadn't had a major hit song in nearly three years. It sold three million copies in two weeks. The song revived the group and led to their getting a CBS variety show that began as a summer replacement program in 1974 and lasted for two seasons. Tie A Yellow Ribbon reached the top of the charts in April 1973 and remained there for a month. It had equal success in the UK where it sold more than one million copies and hit the top of the charts there too. According to one source, it was the second most covered song of the 1970s, trailing only Yesterday by the Beatles. It's a classic upbeat singalong tune that is a favorite at karaoke parties. Tie A Yellow Ribbon has frequently been used to welcome home troops from overseas since the 1980s. This clip shows Tony Orlando and Dawn performing it. I bet you can't listen to it without singing along!
Tags: Tie  A  Yellow  Ribbon  Tony  Orlando  Dawn 
Added: 20th May 2015
Views: 1301
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Posted By: Lava1964
Trumbull CT Wins 1989 LLWS In 1989, Trumbull, Connecticut--population 32,000--won the Little League World series in a spectacular upset, defeating the team from Kaohsiung, Taiwan 5-2 in a thrilling game. Teams from the Far East had dominated the LLWS since international play had widened in the late 1960s. Things got so bad for American teams that foreign teams were excluded from the 1975 tournament. Teams from the Far East demolished all opposition from 1984 through 1988. In 1987 a Taiwanese team crushed the American champs from Irvine, CA so badly (21-1) that a mercy rule was adopted for the 1988 tourney. Thus few people thought much of Trumbull's chances two years later. Here is a seven-minute documentary about how the 1989 upset unfolded. Chris Drury, a pitcher on the Trumbull team, eventually became an NHL hockey player.
Tags: baseball  Little  League  World  Series  Trumbull  CT 
Added: 22nd August 2015
Views: 1422
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Posted By: Lava1964
1952 Corn Pops Commercial The two stars of The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok, Guy Madison and Andy Devine, promote Kellogg's Corn Pops in this 1952 commercial. The syndicated western ran from 1951 though 1958. More than a dozen feature films were made by combining various TV episodes. Bit of trivia: Andy Devine's very recognizable gravelly voice was the result of an odd childhood accident. He damaged his vocal chords when he fell while he had a stick in his mouth! Although he has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Guy Madison, who died in 1996 at age 74, is largely forgotten in North America. He had greater success in Italy where he stared in low-budget westerns and combat films in the 1960s.
Tags: Corn  Pops  Commercial  Andy  Devine  Guy  Madison  Wild  Bill  Hickok 
Added: 7th September 2015
Views: 1751
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Posted By: Lava1964

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