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Total Eclipse of the Heart What a cool song, even now it sounds just as good as when she first performed it. Bonnie Tyler was born Gaynor Hopkins on June 8, 1951 in Skewen in Wales. She is widely recognisable by her highly distinctive, husky voice. In 1977, Tyler underwent surgery to remove nodules on her vocal cords, resulting in her singing voice taking on a raspy quality. Her next hit single, a cover of "It's a Heartache" was taken from Tyler's second album. In spring of 1983 came the single "Total Eclipse of the Heart", written by Jim Steinman. The song was a worldwide smash and reached no.1 in no less than 18 countries including the UK, France, Australia, Japan, Germany, Canada, and the United States, where it remained at the top for 4 weeks. In September 2006, Tyler made her first appearance on U.S. television in many years, as she sang a duet of "Total Eclipse of the Heart" with actress and now singer Lucy Lawless on the Celebrity Duets.
Tags: total  eclipse  of  the  heart  bonnie  tyler  80s  music 
Added: 28th October 2007
Views: 2941
Rating:
Posted By: Babs64
Happy 63rd    Wayne Fontana Remember Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders, and their hit song The Game of Love, from 1965? Here's some interesting facts. In 1962, he formed his group Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders and got a recording contract. He was still under contract to Fontana Records after parting with The Mindbenders. He continued on alone, using musicians under the name of the Opposition. Sometimes they were billed as the Mindbenders, or just as the Wayne Fontana band. In 2005 he fought off bankruptcy, but was arrested after police were called in by bailiffs who went to his home in Glossop, Derbyshire. It is claimed that gasoline had been poured onto the hood of a car, and set on fire with a bailiff inside. Fontana was remanded in custody on May 25, 2007, in regard to the charge. He appeared at Derby Crown Court dressed as the lady of justice, with a sword, scales, crown, cape and dark glasses, claiming "justice is blind". He dismissed his lawyers. All that being said, you have to admit he's still a talented musician. Here's a clip I put together from The Game of Love taped in 1965, and more recently during a show in 2006. They're still doing concerts, and at 63, Wayne Fontana hasn't lost it yet, at least not his voice!
Tags: wayne  fontana  and  the  mindbenders  the  game  of  love 
Added: 28th October 2007
Views: 2002
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Whitney Houston Live  I Will Always Love You An awesome performance of "I Will Always Love You", (from the 1992 film The Bodyguard with Kevin Costner) at Divas 1999. Whitney Houston was one of a few black artists to receive heavy rotation on MTV in the 1980's during a male rock dominated time, in the network's early years. AOL Black Voices said "Though her success seemed like a lightening rod, it was always validated by Whitney's polished and powerful vocal abilities - making her known as "The Voice". After marrying R&B singer Bobby Brown at the height of her career, rumors of drug and spousal abuse led to a decline in her album sales and her public image. Her personal troubles were talked about more than any of her music, and she regularly appeared in the tabloid press. Houston began looking and sounding less like the singer people came to know and she stopped making public appearances. She underwent two drug rehab programs in 2005 and 2006. After a successful second program in 2006, she divorced Bobby Brown and gained custody of their daughter, Bobbi Kristina. She has since been working on her 7th studio album with music mogul and close friend and mentor Clive Davis.
Tags: whitney  houston  i  will  always  love  you  music  black  artists 
Added: 1st November 2007
Views: 2283
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Gary US Bonds Quarter to Three This clip may have been from Bandstand, the year was 1961 and the music was wild! We were dong the "Mashed Potato", the "Pony", and the "Twist", and we were having a ball! Gary joined record producer Frank Guida's small Legrand record label and Guida changed his name to U.S. Bonds in hope that it would be confused with a public service announcement advertising the sale of government bonds and in that way get more airplay. Bonds' first hit was the song "New Orleans", which was followed by "Not Me", a flop for Bonds, but later a hit for The Orlons, and then by his only Number One hit, "Quarter To Three" in June 1961. Subsequent hits, under the name Gary U.S. Bonds, included "School Is Out", "Dear Lady Twist" and "Twist, Twist, Senora" in the early 1960s. In a 1963 tour of Europe, he headlined above The Beatles. While Gary U.S. Bonds is mostly known for achievements within rhythm and blues and rock and roll, he often transcends these genres, he has been nominated for the Country Music Association's "Songwriter of the Year distinction. He is also an honoree of the Rhythm & Blues Foundation. He was inducted into the Long Island Music Hall of Fame on 15 October 2006, and still performs onstage. "Quarter To Three" appears on The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll list.
Tags: gary  us  bonds  quarter  to  three  60s  rock  and  roll  music 
Added: 1st November 2007
Views: 2299
Rating:
Posted By: Babs64
1974 - Japanese WWII Soldier Finally Surrenders Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier, refused to believe the Second World War had ended--and continued his mission of clandestine sabotage for twenty-nine years. On December 26, 1944, Onoda was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines. His orders were to hamper enemy activity on the island, including destroying the airstrip and the pier at the harbor. Onoda's orders also stated that under no circumstances was he to surrender or take his own life. When he landed on the island, Onoda joined forces with other Japanese soldiers. The officers in the group all outranked Onoda, which prevented him from carrying out his assignment. United States and Filipino forces retook Luband Island when they landed on February 28, 1945. Within a short time, all but Onoda and three other soldiers had either died or surrendered. Onoda, who had been promoted to lieutenant, ordered the men to take to the hills. Onoda continued his campaign as a Japanese holdout, initially living in the mountains with three fellow soldiers (Akatsu, Shimada and Kozuka). Although hostilities ceased in August 1945, Onoda and his comrades were oblivious to Japan's unconditional surrender. Thus the foursome carried out guerrilla activities, killed some 30 Filipino citizens, and engaged in several shootouts with the police for years. As early as 1945 Onoda saw a leaflet saying the war had ended, but he and his comrades thought it was enemy propaganda. They continued their bloody raids against local farmers and police. Even leaflets from General Tomoyuki Yamashita of the Fourteenth Area Army failed to convince the maverick soldiers to capitulate. One of the four, Yuichi Akatsu, walked away from the others in September 1949 and surrendered to Filipino forces in 1950 after six months on his own. In 1952 letters and family pictures were dropped from aircraft urging the remaining three to surrender, but they concluded it too was a ruse. Shimada was shot in the leg during a gun battle with local fishermen in June 1953. Onoda nursed him back to health. On May 7, 1954, Shimada was killed by a shot fired by a search party. Kozuka was killed by two shots fired by local police on October 19, 1972, leaving Onoda alone. He and Onoda were burning local farmers' rice harvest as part of their guerrilla activities. On February 20, 1974, Onoda met a young Japanese man, Norio Suzuki, who was on a personal quest to find him. Onoda described this moment in a 2010 interview: "This hippie boy Suzuki came to the island to listen to the feelings of a Japanese soldier. Suzuki asked me why I would not come out..." Onoda and Suzuki became friends, but Onoda still refused to surrender, saying that he was waiting for orders from a superior officer. Suzuki returned to Japan with photographs of himself and Onoda as proof of their encounter. The Japanese government located Onoda's commanding officer, Major Yoshimi Taniguchi, who had become a bookseller in civilian life. On March 9, 1974, Taniguchi met with Onoda and persuaded him to surrender. Onoda turned over his sword, his rifle (still in working order), 500 rounds of ammunition, and several hand grenades, as well as a dagger his mother had given him in 1944. Though he had killed numerous civilians since the war's end, Onoda received a pardon from Filipino president Ferdinand Marcos. Upon his return to Japan, Onoda was uncomfortable with his celebrity status and the erosion of traditional Japanese values. Onoda moved to Brazil where he became a successful cattle rancher. He occasionally returned to Japan to promote conservative causes, including organizing educational camps for wayward Japanese youths. As of December 2013, Onoda was still alive at age 91.
Tags: WWII  Japanese  soldier  surrenders  1974 
Added: 28th December 2013
Views: 1622
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The Comedy of Nichols and May This is one of the funniest sketches I've ever seen. It's about as close to the mother-child relationship as you can get. Mike Nichols and Elaine May created perfectly improvised scenes that were outrageously funny, yet simply understated. Their dry wit and wry satire allowed them to lampoon faceless bureaucracy and such previously sacrosanct institutions as hospitals, politics, funeral homes, and even motherhood. Like other great comedy duos, Nichols and May perfectly complemented each other. They seemed so attuned and at ease with each other that the mis-communication they often based their skits on were all the funnier. Within a short while of arriving in New York, they were the talk of the town, appearing on The Steve Allen Show, introducing a nationwide audience to a humor unlike any on television. Nichols and May spent much of the next three years traveling the country performing together on stage, radio, and television. In 1960, "An Evening with Mike Nichols and Elaine May" had opened on Broadway to rave reviews, but by 1961, Nichols and May would announce the end of their partnership. Interested in pursuing individual careers, the two left behind one of the most popular and imitated comedy acts of its time. Mike Nichols has directed and produced a variety of hit films, such as The Graduate, Silkwood, The Birdcage, Primary Colors, and The Remains of the Day. Elaine May is a two-time Academy Award nominated director, screenwriter, and actress.
Tags: mike  nichols  elaine  may  improvisational  comedy 
Added: 6th November 2007
Views: 4032
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Undercover Putin Met President Reagan A picture has emerged apparently showing Russia's Prime Minister Vladimir Putin in his former days as a KGB officer.The 20-year old photo depicts two world leaders - US President Ronald Reagan and the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev - in Moscow. But, according to the man who took the photo, it also captures Mr Putin disguised as a tourist. Pete Souza, now President Obama's official photographer, captured the moment when he worked for President Reagan during the political thaw that soon ended the Cold War. Mr Reagan took a stroll around Red Square accompanied by the Russian leader, who then introduced him to a group of tourists. In an interview, Mr Souza recounted being surprised at the "pointed" questions these supposed tourists asked the US leader.
Tags: Undercover  Putin  Met  President  Reagan  KGB  Cold  War 
Added: 19th March 2009
Views: 1827
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Posted By: Old Fart
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 3075
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Alfred Mosher Butts Inventor of Scrabble One of my heroes! In 1948 Alfred Mosher Butts, an unemployed architect, invented the greatest word game in the history of the world: Scrabble Brand Crossword Game. He named it Criss-Cross Words and didn't make much money from it. He sold the rights to a family called the Brunots who renamed the game Scrabble and marketed it from their home. It got plenty of rave reviews in the early 1950s. Demand for Scrabble became so great that the Brunots could not keep pace with the orders. They in turn sold the rights to Scrabble to a manufacturer. Over the years Scrabble's ownership has passed through several companies. Hasbro presently owns the North American trademark name of Scrabble. Each year millions of games are sold and hundreds of tournaments are held under the aegis of the National Scrabble Association. (Yours truly is an expert ranked player who directs an official NSA club in Canada. I can often be spotted officiating major Scrabble events. Look for me at the 2008 U.S. Nationals in Orlando in July!)
Tags: Scrabble  Alfred  Butts 
Added: 17th November 2007
Views: 2552
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Richard Dawson Unhappy Match Game Departure CBS had an immediate winner on its hands when it reintroduced TV audiences to Match Game in 1973. Gene Rayburn had hosted a more formal version of the game show in the 1960s, but it was never a big hit. However, the fun, free-wheeling 1970s version on CBS caught the fancy of viewers by the millions with its moderately risque questions in which TINKLE or BOOBS might be proffered as matches to the show's fill-in-the-blank format. Airing weekdays at 4:30 p.m., Match Game drew a wide variety of viewers from housewives to students getting home from school and everything in between. Although Rayburn was again the emcee, Richard Dawson, whose last major TV gig was his role as Corporal Peter Newkirk on Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971, quickly became the show's centerpiece. Seated in the center of the bottom tier, he routinely engaged in witty and humorous banter with Gene and the contestants--and he was consistently the best player on the six-person panel. Match Game was the number-one daytime show in from 1973 until 1976. It was finally usurped by Family Feud, another game based on matching answers that was hosted by...Richard Dawson! His engaging manner absolutely shone in Family Feud. As Family Feud soared in popularity, Dawson became less interested in being a Match Game panelist. Still, Dawson was the clearly best player and would most often be selected by knowledgeable contestants when they were playing for the Super-Match jackpot question. In a candid interview long after Match Game went off the air, fellow regular panelist Brett Somers said she and Charles Nelson Reilly disliked Dawson because of his aloof personality to the point of them silently hoping he would not match the contestant. (Dawson, a non-drinker, did not socialize with the other five panelists during their boisterous lunch breaks where booze flowed freely.) In 1978, CBS expanded its afternoon soap operas to full hours and moved Match Game to a morning time slot. It was a horrendous blunder. The after-school crowd and working people could no longer watch the show. Moreover, a new gimmick--the star wheel-- was introduced. It randomized which celebrity would be used for the jackpot question. Dawson saw the star wheel as a personal slight and his mood on the show noticeably soured. His friendly banter with Gene virtually disappeared. Sensing Dawson was unhappy with Match Game, the show's producers asked if he wanted out of his contract. Dawson said yes. His final appearance on the daytime version of Match Game was episode #1285. He was shown in the opening montage holding a sign that said, "Fare thee well." At the episode's end, Gene made no announcement pertaining to Richard's impending departure--even after he was conspicuously not listed among the celebrity panelists who would be appearing on the following week's shows. Dawson left the studio without saying goodbye to anyone. He and Gene Rayburn never spoke again. Dawson coldly stated years later, "I moved on to greener pastures." Beset by declining ratings, Match Game was cancelled by CBS in 1979, although the syndicated Match Game PM ran until 1982. Rayburn died in 1999. Dawson died in 2012.
Tags: Match  Game  Richard  Dawson  unhappy  departure 
Added: 6th July 2017
Views: 6170
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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