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Tragic Child Actress Judith Barsi Judith Barsi was a prolific child actress who appeared in at least 72 commercials and a handful of movies and TV shows before her horrifying death at age 10 in 1988. Barsi was spotted by a talent scout at a skating rink when she was nearly six years old. He mistook her for a three-year-old. Extremely tiny for her age, she was able to play much younger roles. At age 10 she was only 3'8" tall. Excellent at understanding precisely what directors wanted from her, Barsi appeared in commercials advertising McDonald's restaurants, peanut butter, orange juice, potato chips, soup, and dolls. It is estimated that she was earning close to $100,000 a year from her acting gigs. Fans of the sitcom Cheers will recall Barsi playing the role of a new bartender's adorable little daughter in a 1986 episode titled Relief Bartender (see photo). One of Barsi's last projects was providing the voice of Ducky in the 1988 animated film The Land Before Time. Barsi's home life was a nightmare: Her father, Jozsef, had fled communist Hungary. He was a violent alcoholic who mentally and physically abused Judith and her mother Maria, who was also refugee from Hungary. Judith had told fellow actors that her father had threatened to kill her on several occasions. On July 25, 1988, Barsi was shot to death by her father while she slept in the family's Los Angeles home. He also killed his wife. He stayed with the bodies for two days before burning them and turning his gun on himself. Barsi was supposed to audition for another role on the day she was murdered.
Tags: Judith  Barsi  actress  murder  victim 
Added: 15th January 2015
Views: 2755
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dorothy Arnold - Missing Socialite One of the most intriguing missing persons cases in American history centers around a 24-year-old New York socialite, Dorothy Arnold, who seemingly vanished into thin air one afternoon in New York City in 1910. Arnold was from a wealthy family, the daughter of the 73-year-old head of a prosperous import company and the niece of a Supreme Court justice. Educated at Bryn Mawr, Dorothy was an aspiring writer. On Monday, December 12, 1910, Dorothy left her New York City home at about 11 a.m. telling her mother she would be shopping for an evening gown for an upcoming event. Dorothy left the house with only the clothes on her back and about $30. Arnold went to a candy store and a bookstore where she bought items using the Arnold family credit. When she left the bookstore, Dorothy encountered Gladys King, a friend. King was the last known person to have seen Dorothy. No one who saw Dorothy on December 12 noticed anything odd about her behavior. She apparently never purchased the dress, so she had either lied to her mother or had been interrupted before she could buy it. On the day of her disappearance, Dorothy was fashionably dressed and was a familiar face in New York City. Therefore, it is unlikely that Dorothy could have ventured far without being noticed. That evening, when Dorothy strangely had not returned home for dinner, the Arnold family began making inquiries among her friends. They were unable to turn up any news of their daughter. Fearing some sort of scandal, Dorothy's family did not call the police right away--which was typical of the era. Anyone calling the Arnold home inquiring about Dorothy was told she was in bed with a headache. Dorothy's parents hired a lawyer who privately tried to find Dorothy for six weeks. His investigation got nowhere, so the police were finally contacted in late January of 1911. By that time, Dorothy's trail had gone hopelessly cold. Newspapers played up the story--especially in New York City. It led to several hoaxes, including two phony ransom notes being sent to the Arnold home and a postcard purportedly sent overseas by Dorothy. These were quickly dismissed as inauthentic. After 75 days, the police closed the case under the assumption that Dorothy was dead. However as late as 1935 the New York City police were still receiving tips about alleged sightings of Dorothy. So what happened to Dorothy? She had been unofficially engaged to a 42-year-old man named George (Junior) Griscom--a situation which displeased her family who considered him to be a loafer. There was absolutely no evidence that she and Junior had a falling out or had run away together. In fact, Junior put out several ads imploring Dorothy to contact him, but to no avail. He eventually moved on with his life. Another theory was that Dorothy was upset that her parents had cruelly mocked her for wanting to become a writer and because two of her stories had recently been rejected by magazines. Thus some people speculate Dorothy committed suicide believing that she was a failure. Still no one had evidence that she was anything but happy on the day she disappeared. Yet another theory is that Dorothy died at an illegal abortion clinic and her body was swiftly incinerated in the building's furnace--which was known to happen in 1910. In 1921, John H. Ayers, who headed New York City's Missing Persons Bureau, curiously told an auditorium filled with high school students that Dorothy's fate had always been known to the police and her family but he did not elaborate any further. When journalists pressed him for more details, he quickly claimed he had been misquoted.
Tags: missing  persons  case  Dorothy  Arnold 
Added: 16th January 2015
Views: 2115
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Posted By: Lava1964
Oregon Poisoned Eggs Accident - 1942 On Wednesday, November 18, 1942 a horrible mistake killed 47 patients at the Oregon State Hospital in Salem--a facility housing those afflicted with mental illnesses. An evening meal of scrambled eggs was being prepared by the two-person kitchen crew. The cooking staff had been much larger, but the manpower demands of the Second World War had reduced it to just head cook Mary O'Hare and her male assistant A.B. McKillop. Against hospital policy, McKillop designated a trusted patient, 27-year-old George A. Nosen, to go to a downstairs storage room to get a scoopful of powdered milk to add to the frozen egg yolks. Nosen entered the wrong room and brought back a six-pound scoop of roach poison from an unmarked bin. The roach poison contained huge amounts of sodium fluoride. In very tiny amounts, sodium fluoride is harmless. It is found in most toothpastes in minuscule amounts to strengthen teeth. However, even an amount as small as an aspirin can be deadly to a human. Within a short time of the eggs being served, patients became violently ill, some vomiting blood. By midnight 30 patients had died. The death toll eventually rose to 47. About 460 patients in total suffered some ill effects. McKillop quickly suspected something had gone terribly amiss because of the powdered milk. This was confirmed when Nosen showed him the bin where it had come from. Investigators were perplexed as the kitchen staff initially reported that nothing outside the norm had happened in preparing the meal. Beyond the hospital theories abounded about what may have caused the deaths. Some people blamed them on a deliberate act of malice by a homicidal patient. Others thought it was an extreme case of salmonella due to improper food storage. Still others thought it might be war-related sabotage as the frozen egg yolks were the same type that were being sent overseas to feed American troops. Eventually McKillop's conscience bothered him and he told the truth about Nosen mistaking the roach poison for powdered milk. McKillop wanted to be held solely responsible for the mishap, but he, O'Hare and Nosen were all arrested. They were never charged as a Grand Jury ruled the incident to have been merely a tragic accident--one that killed nearly four dozen innocent patients. Nosen remained an inmate at the hospital--where he was looked upon as a pariah--until his death in 1983 at age 68. He suffered a fatal heart attack while scuffling with a 75-year-old patient.
Tags: poisoned  eggs  Oregon  1942 
Added: 27th April 2015
Views: 1731
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Posted By: Lava1964
Death of Don Drysdale Announced Hall of Fame pitcher Don Drysdale--who became an excellent broadcaster in his post-baseball-playing days--died suddenly on July 3, 1993. As part of the Los Angeles Dodgers' broadcast team, Drysdale's colleagues became alarmed when he was uncharacteristically absent for the team's game in Montreal that night. Drysdale was found dead in his hotel room. He was a few weeks shy of his 57th birthday. A coroner estimated he had been dead for about 18 hours. Dodger broadcaster Vin Scully knew about Drysdale's death but was told not to mention it on the air until Drysdale's wife had been informed. Here's how Vin Scully calmly informed the viewers back in LA about the sad situation. In contrast Scully's announcement is followed by Chicago White Sox broadcaster Ken Harrelson's emotional announcement that same night.
Tags: Don  Drysdale  Death  announcement  baseball 
Added: 22nd May 2015
Views: 1748
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Posted By: Lava1964
Katyn Forest Massacre - 1940 One of the most horrifying events during the Second World War was the Katyn Forest massacres which occurred in the spring of 1940. About half the officer corps of Poland was put to death by the Soviet Union's secret police (NKVD). In August 1939 Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union--two ideological enemies--shocked the world by signing a non-aggression pact. As part of the deal, Germany was allowed a free hand to invade Poland from the west on September 1. The Soviets would invade from the east half a month later. The Poles were utterly overwhelmed. The Soviet Red Army met almost no opposition as the Polish Army was told by its government to not confront the Russians. In effect, conquered Poland was divided into two sections: one controlled by Nazi Germany, the other under the heel of the Soviet Union. Polish prisoners in the Soviet Sphere numbered about 30,000. At least 22,000 were executed methodically by gunshots to the back of their heads from close range. Along with most of the Polish officer corps, numerous intellectuals, journalists, doctors, lawyers, and professors were also killed by the NKVD on the special order of Josef Stalin. Their corpses were hastily buried in mass graves in the Katyn Forest. After the Germans attacked the Soviet Union in 1941, they learned about the mas graves. Sensing a propaganda bonanza that would demonize the USSR, they exhumed thousands of corpses. International Red Cross officials and top forensic scientists were called in by the Germans to make a report. They all agreed the massacre was done by the Soviets. Some Allied POWs were also brought in to witness the scene. One American agreed, saying the Russians were undeniably to blame. After reconquering the area, the Soviets blamed the Germans for the massacre. It took until 1990 before the Soviet Union accepted responsibility for the mass extermination of the cream of Poland's officer corps and much of its intellectual community half a century before.
Tags: Katyn  Forest  massacre  NKVD  Second  World  War 
Added: 11th June 2015
Views: 2134
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bob Beamon Shatters Long Jump Record Back in 2007 I posted another video on this topic, but this one is much better in quality--and substance. To me this clip shows the greatest single individual accomplishment in the history of sports: Bob Beamon obliterating the world record for the long jump in 1968. Going into the Mexico City Olympics, Bob Beamon was having a bad year on the international athletics circuit. His teammate, Ralph Boston, was thought to be the best hope for the USA to win the gold medal in the long jump. That all changed on the first jump of the finals. Beamon executed a technically flawless leap and seemed to accelerate in mid air. When he landed there was a problem: Beamon had surpassed the officials' ability to measure the jump with the equipment they had available. The existing world record was 27 feet 4.75 inches. During the tense time when everyone was waiting for a measurement, Boston told Beamon, "Bob, I think it's past 29 feet." Incredulous, Beamon replied, "What happened to 28 feet?" After an agonizingly long delay because an old-fashioned tape measure had to be found, Beamon's jump was measured at 8.90 meters. That's 29 feet 2.5 inches. Beamon had surpassed the old mark by 21.75 inches. To put that into proper perspective, in the previous 32 years the world record for the long jump had advanced only eight inches. Beamon started to celebrate but was quickly overcome by the enormity of what he had done. He collapsed on the infield and wept uncontrollably; his body became limp like a rag doll. Some people credit Beamon's leap to the high altitude of Mexico City, but if that were the case it would have helped the other jumpers too. No one else even came close to the old world record! Beamon's record stood for nearly 23 years. Although it was broken by Mike Powell in 1991, Beamon's jaw-dropping achievement is a testament to untapped human potential.
Tags: Bob  Beamon  long  jump  world  record  Mexico  City  Olympics 
Added: 27th June 2015
Views: 1270
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Posted By: Lava1964
President Truman Threatens Music Critic President Harry S. Truman had one child--daughter Margaret--who was born in 1924. She began singing locally in choirs in Missouri as a youth. By the late 1940s, when her father was president, she got more noteworthy singing gigs on the radio and in occasional concerts. On December 5, 1950 Margaret performed a program of Schumann, Schubert and Mozart pieces at Constitution Hall in Washington. The Washington Post's music critic, Paul Hume, wrote, "Miss Truman is a unique American phenomenon with a pleasant voice of little size and fair quality. She is extremely attractive on stage. Yet Miss Truman cannot sing very well. She is flat a good deal of the time--more so last night than at any time we have heard her in past years." Upon reading Hume's review, father Harry's paternal instincts kicked in and he went berserk. The president quickly penned a blistering missive to Hume that called him a "frustrated old man who wishes he could have been successful." It concluded with the president bluntly stating, "Some day I hope to meet you. When that happens you'll need a new nose, a lot of beefsteak for black eyes, and perhaps a supporter below." Hume was astonished by the letter and showed it to his editor who planned to print it in the next issue of the Post. However, the paper's publisher nixed the idea. Nevertheless, Hume told Milton Berliner, the music critic of the Washington News, about HST's threatening letter. The story ran in the rival newspaper and was later widely circulated well beyond the District of Columbia via the wire services.
Tags: Harry  Margaret  Truman  singer  criticism  threat 
Added: 5th July 2015
Views: 1989
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fabrege Organics Tags: Fabrege  Organics  Shampoo  they  told  two  fiends  natural  wheat  germ  and  honey  conditioner  women  men   
Added: 18th July 2015
Views: 883
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Posted By: Cathy
Dempsey-Carpentier Bout - First Million-Dollar Gate On Saturday, July 2, 1921, world heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey defended his title versus France's Georges Carpentier. The venue was a specially built stadium at a place called Boyle's Thirty Acres in Jersey City, NJ. More than 92,000 fans filled the wooden bowl paying between $5.50 for a distant perch in the far bleachers and $50 for a ringside seat. All told, the crowd paid nearly $1.8 million for the privilege of watching a prize fight--the first time the million-dollar mark had ever been eclipsed. The huge gate was the result of several factors: Dempsey was an exciting heavyweight with plenty of knockouts on his record. Carpentier was a glamorous and handsome French war hero whose every move was followed in the society pages of New York City's newspapers. Thus women attended the fight in huge numbers. (In contrast, Dempsey was disliked in some quarters for having no service record during the First World War.) The fight was broadcast on the new medium of radio for the first time. With the stadium dangerously swaying due to the weight of the enormous crowd, the main event started about 30 minutes early. Before the fight started, promoter Tex Rickard pleaded with Dempsey not to knock out the much smaller Carpentier in the first round so the fans would get their money's worth. Dempsey agreed, but he was solidly hit with a hard right hand from the Frenchman. This was bad news for the challenger: Carpentier broke his thumb with the blow--and he had angered the fearsome champion. Dempsey wore down Carpentier with hard body shots into the fourth round. In that fourth round Carpentier was knocked down twice. The second time he did not get up. Dempsey received $300,000 for about 11 minutes of work.
Tags: boxing  Jack  Dempsey  Georges  Carpentier. 
Added: 19th July 2015
Views: 1076
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Posted By: Lava1964
10cc - I 'I'm Mandy, Fly Me' by Eric, Graham and Lol begins with the hook-line from 'Clockwork Creep' (on second album 'Sheet Music') and an airplane flying overhead before being swiped aside by a fat bass line, exotic synthesiser sound effects, a vocoder apparently whispering 'amazing grace' and whistling. We find out later that the airplane has crash-landed in the water, with the narrator thrown out of the plane (his first line is that he's 'on the outside looking in') but rather than sound petrified or angry, the narrator bobbing in the water is ecstatic. The poster he sees on the side of the aircraft, of an air-hostess named Mandy, 'with a smile as bright as sunshine' causes him to hallucinate (or so it seems) and takes him out of himself ('The world was spinning like a ball, and then it wasn't there at all!') Mandy gives him the 'kiss of life' that saves him, his addled brain setting off on a journey of exotic acoustic guitars and psychedelic effects that ends only when he's pulled from the wreckage; he asks for Mandy but she's not there. A love song to an imaginary person, created by a situation so intense and extreme that the 'real essence' of life comes into sharp contrast, 'Mandy' is balancing a lot of things for a humble catchy single. For a start we don't know who to believe: the narrator is clearly awake enough to realise that what's happening to him seems like a film (Mandy acts 'just like the girl in Dr No, no no no') and yet when he tells his rescuers later that it might have all been in his head they tell him 'no no no no' and that she was was real, yet currently missing - do they mean this? Or is that simply a ruse to keep him awake and conscious in the hope that the pair might be reunited? (note the sheer amount of denies in each of those two lines, the sort of things you do when you're lying to someone). The key line of this song is 'if your chance would you take it?' - would you be prepared to create a whole new life for yourself in your mind to keep yourself alive? And if you did, what would happen to you afterwards when you realised you were making it all up? It's interesting in this context that the band chose an 'air hostess' as their 'exotic woman' (the first in a whole sequence of imaginary confident Eric Stewart girls who'll end up seducing him on subways and all sorts in albums to come): air hostesses never seem quite real anyway, what with all that make-up and being made up to look the same. This clearly isn't a 'real' woman: she's the sort you see everywhere if you travel by plane a lot and even that name - Mandy - isn't a common one amongst 'real' people, though it's used a lot in books. The result is a fourth straight song in a row that's easy to admire and yet there's something difficult to fall in love with compared to earlier classic 10cc singles: there's too many questions and not enough answers for this to be an 'easy ride', with the sudden switch of gears every time the band break out for another instrumental making this song less easy on the ears than, say, 'I'm Not In Love' or 'Rubber Bullets'. Still, this is a lot of people's favourite 10cc song for a reason: its a love song told with such a radical twist that no one on first hearing could have heard it coming (if they'd understood it at all), traditionally loved by 'true' fans (although interestingly co-writer Lol Creme wasn't one of them; it was this song he quoted as evidence that the band were growing stale). In actuality 'Mandy' is a clever hybrid of catchy commercialism and bonkers uniqueness that couldn't possibly have been thought up by another band, but there are better mixtures of the same ingredients around, even on this same album.
Tags: 10cc,  Pop  Music,  Rock  Music,  1976 
Added: 11th August 2018
Views: 866
Rating:
Posted By: Maitlandsplace

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