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Bobby Goldsboro  LITTLE THINGS From the tv show Hullabaloo in 1965. Bobby Goldsboro started out in the early sixties as a guitarist with Roy Orbison. During his three years with Orbison he traveled all over the world and even toured with The Beatles. In 1964 he began his solo career by recording the first of a string of sixteen top-forty hits, “See the Funny Little Clown.” One of his first concert bookings had him opening for the Rolling Stones on their first U.S. tour. More million-selling hits followed, setting the stage for 1968 and the classic, “Honey,” which became the largest-selling record in the world. “Watching Scotty Grow,” “Little Green Apples” and “With Pen in Hand” have also become classics.
Tags: bobby  goldsboro  little  things  60s  music 
Added: 10th November 2007
Views: 3083
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Posted By: Babs64
Momma Told Me Not To Come add Johnny to this video and it looks REALLY wild!
Tags: film  fear  and  loathing  in  las  vegas  johnny  depp  benicio  del  toro  christina  ricci  three  dog  night   
Added: 12th November 2007
Views: 2634
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Posted By: Teresa
The New Andy Griffith Show 1971 After eight successful seasons, The Andy Griffith Show went off the air in 1968 as television's number-one show. In September 1970, CBS created a new series for Griffith, a comedy-drama titled 'Headmaster,' in which Griffith played the headmaster of a co-ed California prep school. Viewers, accustomed to Griffith playing a southern sheriff, rejected the show. It was scrapped after just three months. Undeterred, CBS then cast Griffith in a more folksy-type role as a small-town North Carolina mayor in The New Andy Griffith Show. Even though it was written and created by Aaron Ruben (who had created the original Andy Griffith Show) it too never caught on with viewers. It was yanked after just 12 episodes in CBS' infamous 'rural purge' when all its non-urban sitcoms were axed. Here is the opening of Griffith's second failure of the 1970-71 season.
Tags: New  Andy  Griffith  Show 
Added: 19th March 2009
Views: 3631
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Posted By: Lava1964
Would She Still Push Them Today In 1952, opera singer Margaurite Piazza made this commercial for Camel cigarettes. In 1968, she endured three operations on her face to remove cancer, and, in 1973, she was treated for cervical and uterine cancer.
Tags: camel  cigarettes  margaurite  piazza  commercials   
Added: 15th November 2007
Views: 1574
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Posted By: Guido
Sideshow   Blue Magic Wow, this is so awesome!! Blue Magic became popular in 1974 with their first million-selling US Top 10 hit single Sideshow and Three Ring Circus. They are known also for their choreography. As a very visually oriented group they have had several television appearances. These include: "Soul Train," "The Mike Douglas Show," "The Jerry Blavat Show," "Dancin' On Air," and "A.M. Philadelphia". In April of 1975 BLUE MAGIC was chosen as the best new group of the year which earned them an Ebony Award.
Tags: blue  magic  sideshow  70s  music 
Added: 15th November 2007
Views: 1991
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Posted By: Sophia
Name the Band #1 Name the group. #2 Name the three well known members and the bands they were with.
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Added: 5th March 2009
Views: 917
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Posted By: MizzouHillbilly
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 3138
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Posted By: Lava1964
Diffrent Strokes cast photo This is a cast photo from Diff'rent Strokes, a popular NBC sitcom that ran from 1978 through 1985. The show was about a Park Avenue millionaire widower who decides to adopt two black kids. (I'm sure that happens all the time!) The cst members were Todd Bridges as Willis, Conrad Bain as Mr. Drummond, Dana Plato as Kimberley, and Gary Coleman as Arnold. Today the show is cynically remembered for the legal and social troubles that befell its youthful stars. A Johnny Carson Carnac routine summed it up best: The answer is coffee, donuts, and a Diff'rent Strokes cast member. The question is name three things you find in the back seat of a police car!
Tags: Diffrent  Strokes  cast 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 1995
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Posted By: Lava1964
Connie Mack 1927 Baseball scholars will recognize the man on the cover of Time Magazine as Connie Mack, baseball's grand patriarch and most enduring manager. Born Cornelius McGillicuddy, Mack, a former catcher, managed the Pittsburgh Pirates for three seasons (1894 thorugh 1896) and the Philadelphia Athletics for 50 seasons (1901 through 1950) for the astonishing total of 7,755 games managed! The fact that he owned the Athletics ensured he never got fired. His teams fluctuated from greatness to ineptitude largely because he was reluctant to pay big salaries to keep his star players. (His 1931 Athletics won 107 of 154 games. In contrast, Mack's 1916 Athletics won just 36 games.) Mack never wore a uniform on the bench, always a business suit. Much beloved by the baseball establishment, Mack was once quoted as saying he preferred his teams to start well but finish in fourth place. That way he would make a profit for the season but his players couldn't demand raises!
Tags: Connie  Mack  baseball 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2543
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Posted By: Lava1964
Leopold and Loeb murder case 1924 One of the most despicable murder cases in the twentieth century was that of Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb, residents of suburban Chicago, who murdered 14-year-old Bobby Franks in 1924. Their motive: They wanted to kill for the thrill of it and commit the perfect crime. Both Leopold, age 20, and Loeb, age 19, were exceptionally brilliant students who considered themselves intellectual supermen. On May 21, 1924 they lured Bobby Franks (a distant relative of Loeb) into a rented car. Franks was bludgeoned with a chisel and suffocated with a sock. His body was dumped into a culvert in Gary, Indiana and doused with acid to make identification difficult. The culprits mailed a typed ransom note to Franks' parents indicating that Bobby had been kidnapped. However, Franks' body was found before any ransom could be paid. Also found near the body were a pair of eye glasses that fell from Loeb's pocket during the crime. The glasses were almost unique--only three pairs had been made by a certain optician--and they led the police to Loeb. The two young men, who were reputedly homosexual lovers, were questioned and their alibis discredited. Each eventually confessed his involvement in the crime, but insisted the other was responsible for the actual murder. They were brought to trial for murder and kidnapping. Their lawyer, the famous Clarence Darrow, entered pleas of guilty in order to avoid a jury deciding the twosome's fate--which likely would have been a death sentence. Instead Darrow argued with a judge to spare his guilty clients from the death penalty. Darrow gave a rousing 12-hour oration that spared his clients' lives. Instead Leopold and Loeb were each given life sentences plus 99 years. Loeb was murdered in prison in 1936. Leopold was pardoned in 1958 and died of a heart attack in 1971. Bobby Franks, often forgotten by history, remains 14 years old forever.
Tags: Leopold  Loeb  Franks 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 3222
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Posted By: Lava1964

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