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Vanishing TV Character - Bub OCasey My Three Sons was one of televisions's longest-running sitcoms, airing 380 episodes over 12 seasons. It first aired on ABC from 1960 through 1965 and then on CBS from 1965 through 1972. The premise of the show was that Stephen Douglas (played by Fred MacMurray) was a widowed aeronautical engineer with three sons whose ages spanned about 12 years. We never learn much about his deceased wife--not even her first name. With Stephen Douglas often busy, his father-in-law, crusty but good-natured Bub O'Casey, was brought into the family fold to be the equivalent of the 'mother': the person who would cook, clean, shop, do laundry, mend clothes, and so forth. Bub was played by William Frawley who had earlier gained TV fame as Fred Mertz on I Love Lucy in the 1950s. The show was immediately popular but never quite managed to crack the Nielsen top 10 in ratings. Fred MacMurray, who was once the highest paid actor in Hollywood, only agreed to be in the show if he could shoot all his scenes in three months. ABC agreed to this unusual demand. This meant the scripts for an entire season had to be prepared so MacMurray's scenes could all be shot over the space of three months and then pieced together with scenes involving only the other cast members who had a standard shooting schedule. Four seasons into the show, a problem arose: Frawley's health was declining to the point where ABC could not get him insured in case it had to pay for an entire season of episodes to be re-shot with a replacement if Frawley died or was incapacitated by illness. Thus ABC felt it was financially prudent to unceremoniously drop Frawley from the cast midway through the 1964-65 season. (It was explained that Bub had gone to Ireland to look after his 104-year-old Aunt Katie.) Enter William Demarest, who took on the role of Charley O'Casey--Bub's seafaring brother. He was persuaded to become the new Mr. Mom at the Douglas home and proved to be even more grumpy than Bub, but just as lovable deep down. Bub was seldom mentioned again once Uncle Charley entered the scene. Apparently Frawley resented Demarest for replacing him in the cast. Because only the 1965 to 1970 episodes are widely syndicated, many newer fans of My Three Sons are utterly unaware of Bub O'Casey. The insurance concerns were very valid: Frawley died suddenly in March 1966 at age 79.
Tags: Bub  OCasey  My  Three  Sons  William  Frawley 
Added: 9th March 2015
Views: 2883
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Threes A Crowd - Failed Spinoff After Three's Company left the airwaves in the spring of 1984, ABC cast John Ritter in his Jack Tripper role once again that autumn in Three's A Crowd. The premise of this spinoff was that Jack was now living with his stewardess girlfriend Vicky Bradford in an apartment above his restaurant (Jack's Bistro). Complicating matters was that Vicky's meddlesome father James owned the building. Like many spinoffs, Three's a Crowd lacked the magic of its parent show. It was cancelled after just one season. Here is the opening montage.
Tags: spinoff  Threes  A  Crowd  John  Ritter 
Added: 24th March 2015
Views: 1184
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Love American Style - The Elopement Love American Style was a light-hearted program that aired on ABC from 1969 to 1974. It was usually comprised of three unrelated segments that involved some sort of romantic entanglement. The show had no ongoing cast; familiar actors from other TV shows normally played the lead roles. The show's main segments were separated with 'blackouts'--short, comedic vignettes. Love American Style was considered somewhat risque for its time because of its bedroom humor. Here's a good example: Davy Jones and Karen Valentine star in this 10-minute clip from 1970 about an elopement that goes wrong when the groom-to-be enters the wrong girl's window. It is preceded by a 'blackout' that would have raised a few eyebrows in 1970. (Try to ignore the logo that appears in the middle of the screen.)
Tags: Love  American  Style  Davy  Jones  Karen  Valentine 
Added: 10th April 2015
Views: 1760
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1977 WWWF Manager of the Year Award Another oddball clip from days of yore when pro wrestling was fun and plausibly believable: In 1977 the World Wide Wrestling Federation (now the WWE) held a public vote for 'Manager of the Year.' The four candidates were three heels (Freddie Blassie, the Grand Wizard, and Lou Albano) and one good guy (Arnold Skaaland). This clip shows the big moment when the winner was announced. Need I tell you that something goes amiss? After all, it's rasslin'!
Tags: WWWF  manager  of  the  year  1977  pro  wrestling 
Added: 24th April 2015
Views: 1465
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1967 Stanley Cup Finals - Game 3 OT The year 1967 was Canada's centennial, so it was somewhat fitting that the two Canadian NHL teams would meet in that year's Stanley Cup final. The 1966-67 NHL season was also the last year of the old six-team league; the following season the league would double in size to 12 clubs. Here are some highlights from the two overtime periods from Game #3 at Maple Leaf Gardens. It seems from another world: NHL players with no helmets, two barefaced goalies, no advertising on the boards or on the ice, and end-to-end excitement in a critical game! Bill Hewitt and Brian McFarlane call the action. The Toronto Maple Leafs would beat the Montreal Canadiens in six games to win the Stanley Cup. Toronto has not even been in the Cup finals in all the years since 1967.
Tags: hockey  NHL  Stanley  Cup  final  game  three  overtime 
Added: 7th May 2015
Views: 1486
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Canada Beats USSR - 1955 IIHF Tourney The International Ice Hockey Federation has been holding world championship tourneys since 1908. Prior to 1977 the events operated as strictly amateur tourneys much like the Olympic Games once did. Canada typically sent local teams to the IIHF championship and still routinely dominated the tourneys against European national teams. In 1954 the Soviet Union sent a team to world championship for the first time and surprised Canada 7-2 to win the title in Stockholm. With the tournament being held in West Germany in 1955, Canada sent its national amateur finalist team--the Penticton (BC) Vees--to regain national honor. Nine teams competed in the round-robin event. Both the Soviet Union and Canada were 7-0 going into their meeting, so the winner would get the gold medals. The crowd in Krefeld, West Germany included numerous Canadian military personnel stationed nearby along with boisterous German locals who hated all things Russian. The Vees--led by the three Warwick brothers--won handily, 5-0. The Canadian team only allowed six goals in eight games. Here is about a minute of silent newsreel footage of the last game--including two Canadian goals. There's a terrific monument in Penticton that honors the 1955 Vees. History does repeat itself: Sixty years later Canada won the 2015 tourney by defeating the Russians again by five goals. This time the score was 6-1.
Tags: Penticton  Vees  1955  IIHF  hockey 
Added: 20th May 2015
Views: 1298
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Tie A Yellow Ribbon - 1973 In 1972 songwriter Irwin Levine read a newspaper story about a prisoner who was overcome with angst as his pending release from jail drew nearer. He was deeply concerned that his wife would not want to remain married after his long absence from her. The prisoner, in advance of his release, asked his wife to provide a symbol of acceptance before he arrived home. Levine and co-writer L. Russell Brown took the story and turned it into one of the truly great songs from the 1970s: Tie A Yellow Ribbon (Round The Ole Oak Tree). It was recorded by Tony Orlando and Dawn, a group which hadn't had a major hit song in nearly three years. It sold three million copies in two weeks. The song revived the group and led to their getting a CBS variety show that began as a summer replacement program in 1974 and lasted for two seasons. Tie A Yellow Ribbon reached the top of the charts in April 1973 and remained there for a month. It had equal success in the UK where it sold more than one million copies and hit the top of the charts there too. According to one source, it was the second most covered song of the 1970s, trailing only Yesterday by the Beatles. It's a classic upbeat singalong tune that is a favorite at karaoke parties. Tie A Yellow Ribbon has frequently been used to welcome home troops from overseas since the 1980s. This clip shows Tony Orlando and Dawn performing it. I bet you can't listen to it without singing along!
Tags: Tie  A  Yellow  Ribbon  Tony  Orlando  Dawn 
Added: 20th May 2015
Views: 1267
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1985 NBA Draft Lottery Conspiracy Many NBA fans steadfastly claim that the league's first draft lottery, held in 1985, was rigged. Prior to 1985, the two teams that finished in last place in the NBA's two conferences used a coin toss to determine which of the bottom-feeders would pick first overall in the collegiate draft that summer. This practice led to the accusation that some teams that had little hope of being competitive were deliberately tanking games to get in on the coin toss. To make tanking a less attractive proposition, the NBA instituted a 'draft lottery' in 1985 in which the seven teams that did not qualify for the playoffs had an equal chance of getting the first overall pick. In 1985 that selection would obviously be used to choose Patrick Ewing of Georgetown University who had led the Hoyas to three berths in the NCAA final in four years. Even before the draft was held there was scuttlebutt that the NBA would rig the draw so that the New York Knicks, the team with the biggest TV market, would get the #1 pick. The lottery was held at New York's Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. CBS televised the lottery between halves of a playoff game. As this clip shows, it was a very simplistic lottery. Seven sealed envelopes, each containing a team's logo, were put into a transparent sphere drum. The drum was spun. Commissioner David Stern selected the seven envelopes one at a time for the one to seven draft slots in that order. Almost immediately conspiracy theorists argued the draw had been rigged in favor of the Knicks. The fourth envelope tossed into the drum contained the Knicks' logo. It ended up with a bent corner because it was tossed into the drum more strongly than the other envelopes. Some cynics even claim the Knicks' envelope was frozen so Commissioner Stern would select the coldest envelope first! Others point out that the law firm responsible for overseeing the fairness of the lottery had a financial interest in the Knicks. Interestingly, the team that ended up with the seventh pick, Golden State, had the worst record in the NBA in 1984-85. In previous years they would have gotten no worse than the second pick. David Stern has always scoffed at the idea that the 1985 lottery was rigged. Watch for yourself and decide if anything was amiss.
Tags: 1985  NBA  draft  lottery  conspiracy 
Added: 21st May 2015
Views: 1338
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bowling Stars - Billy Welu vs. Johnny King (Part 2 of 2) "Bowling Stars" was a filmed, syndicated TV series that aired in the 1950s pitting two top professional bowlers in a three-game match, with the winner decided by total pinfall. The final frames of the second match and the entirety of the third match were shown. This week's episode shows reigning champion Billy Welu against Johnny King. "Whispering" Joe Wilson, who was the original play-by-play voice on the early "Championship Bowling" episodes, calls the action. Originally telecast in 1957 from Faetz-Niesen Recreation Center* in Chicago. *More recently known as Ridge Bowl.
Tags: Sports,  Bowling,  Chicago,  1950s 
Added: 24th May 2015
Views: 1603
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Posted By: 1jazzguy
Affirmed Wins Triple Crown - 1978 When Affirmed won the thoroughbred racing's Triple Crown in 1978, the feat did not receive near as much publicity in the mainstream sports media as it should have, perhaps with good reason. There had been three Triple Crown champions in six years, including one just the year before (Seattle Slew). However, it would be 37 years before another horse (American Pharaoh) repeated the achievement. Here is Affirmed's narrow victory in the 1978 Belmont Stakes. Renowned CBS announcer Chic Anderson calls the race--the last major one of his career as he died of a heart attack the following March at age 47. Runner-up Alydar finished second in all three Triple Crown races in 1978.
Tags: Affirmed  Triple  Crown    horse  racing  Belmont  Stakes 
Added: 8th June 2015
Views: 1058
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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