Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
The Name Of The Game TV Series Starring three major television superstars: Robert Stack (The Untouchables), Gene Barry (Bat Masterson), and Tony Franciosa (Valentine's Day).
Tags: The  Name  Of  The  Game  TV  Series 
Added: 3rd May 2010
Views: 1829
Rating:
Posted By: Music Maiden
Chase- Get It On As the 1970s began, Bill Chase found himself thinking of creating his dream band. The group evolved over six months into the four trumpets, four rhythm instruments and one vocalist arrangement which earned the group a "Best New Artist" Grammy nomination 1971. When his group Chase blasted on the scene with "Get It On," The trip to the top was swift. Chase was soon in demand by Johnny Carson, The Smothers Brothers and many of the other hot variety shows on television. In 1974, Chase chartered a plane to take him and three band members to a performance in Jackson, MN. The weather was bad with a low ceiling, and the airport in Jackson had little communications equipment. The plane went down, but was not found until the next day. There were no survivors.
Tags: Chase-  Get  It  On 
Added: 4th May 2010
Views: 1790
Rating:
Posted By: Music Maiden
The Kraut Line During the 1930s and 1940s, the Boston Bruins' offense was geared around its famous 'Kraut Line' of Bobby Bauer, Milt Schmidt and Woody Dumart. All three hailed from Kitchener, Ontario which had (and still has) a large German population. The line helped Boston win Stanley Cups in both 1939 and 1941. During the Second World War, the threesome's moniker was changed to 'the Kitchener Kids' because, as hockey historian Brian McFarlane noted with understatement, 'Things German weren't too popular.'
Tags: hockey  Kraut  Line  Boston  Bruins 
Added: 19th May 2010
Views: 2806
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Olympic Lacrosse Lacrosse was an official medal sport in two Summer Olympics: 1904 and 1908. Canada won both 'tournaments' (if you can call them that). In 1904 at St. Louis there were only three teams competing. Two of them were Canadian. In 1908, the tourney in London consisted of one game between Canada and Great Britain. It was played more than three months after the other Olympic events had concluded! This photograph is from that game, won by Canada 14-10.
Tags: Olympic  lacrosse 
Added: 29th May 2010
Views: 1134
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Cigar Store Indians Cigar store Indians (or wooden Indians) were used by tobacconists as garish advertising figures. At one point in the late nineteenth century, the cigar store Indian was a tobacco icon much like striped poles were for barber shops or three gold balls were for pawn shops. The figures were often three-dimensional wooden sculptures several feet tall; some were life-sized. They were first utilized because of the general illiteracy of the populace. American Indians and tobacco had always been associated. Since Indians had introduced tobacco to Europeans, the depiction of native people on smoke-shop signs was inevitable. As early as the seventeenth century, European tobacconists used figures of American Indians to advertise their shops. The statues began to lose their prominence in twentieth century America largely because cities began restricting the presence of intrusive objects on public sidewalks. Most surviving figures are museum pieces and collectors' items.
Tags: cigar  store  Indian 
Added: 20th June 2010
Views: 2165
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Adding Machine 1905 Adding machines have been around for more than a century, but the old-fashioned 'crank' models had pretty much disappeared from offices by the late 1980s. William S. Burroughs (1855-1898) invented an adding and listing machine with a full keyboard in the early 1880s. He submitted a patent application in 1885, co-founded the American Arithmometer Co. in 1886 to produce the machine, and received a patent for his invention in 1888. After its Bankers' and Merchants' Registering Accountant machine failed in trials in 1890, the American Arithmometer Co. marketed its improved Burroughs Registering Accountant in 1892 for $475. In 1905, the company was renamed the Burroughs Adding Machine Co. In 1894, an article in a bankers' publication-- clearly referring to the Burroughs Registering Accountant--reported that 'An ingenious adding machine, recently introduced in Providence banks, is said to be infallible in results, and to do the work of two or three active clerks. Inclosed in a frame with heavy plate-glass panels, through which the working of the mechanism can be seen, the machine occupies a space of 11 by 15 inches and is nine inches high. On an inclined keyboard are 81 keys, arranged in nine rows of nine keys each. The printing is done through an inked ribbon.' Shown here is a Burroughs model from 1905. A seat is provided for the user! How quaint!
Tags: adding  machine 
Added: 22nd June 2010
Views: 2311
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Lolita Controversy Vladimir Nabokov's novel Lolita deals with a middle-aged writer's sexual infatuation with a 12-year-old girl. Due to its shocking and risque subject matter, Nabokov was unable to find an American publisher for Lolita after finishing his manuscript in 1953. After four refusals, he finally resorted to Olympia Press in Paris in September 1955. (The photo below shows a copy of a first edition.) Although the first printing of 5,000 copies sold out quickly, there were no substantial reviews. However, at the end of 1955, Graham Greene, in an interview with the Times of London, called Lolita one of the best novels of 1955. This statement provoked a response from London's Sunday Express, whose editor called it 'the filthiest book I have ever read' and 'sheer unrestrained pornography.' British Customs officers were then instructed by a panicked Home Office to seize all copies entering the United Kingdom. In December 1956, the French followed suit and the Minister of the Interior banned Lolita. (The ban lasted for two years.) Its eventual British publication by Weidenfeld and Nicolson caused a scandal that contributed to the end of the political career of one of the publishers, Nigel Nicolson. In contrast, American officials were initially nervous, but the first American edition was issued without problems by G.P. Putnam's Sons in 1958, and was a bestseller--the first book since Gone with the Wind to sell 100,000 copies in the first three weeks of publication. Today Lolita is widely considered to be one of the finest novels of the 20th century. In 1998, it was named the fourth greatest English language novel of the 20th century by the Modern Library.
Tags: fiction  Lolita  publishing  controversy 
Added: 8th July 2010
Views: 3343
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Home Run Baker John Franklin Baker was the Philadelphia Athletics' third baseman during their glory years of the early 1910s. Baker first led the American League in home runs in 1911 and earned the nickname 'Home Run' during the 1911 World Series versus the New York Giants. In that series he hit a go-ahead homer off Rube Marquard in game two, and a ninth-inning game-tying homer off Christy Mathewson in game three. His 1911 home run crown would be the first of four consecutive seasons leading the American League. His home run totals during the dead-ball era were modest: He hit 11 in 1911, 10 in 1912, 12 in 1913, and nine home runs in 1914. His career home run total is just 48--a clear indication that home runs were a rarity in the 'dead ball era.'
Tags: baseball  Home  Run  Baker 
Added: 19th July 2010
Views: 1469
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Ray Combs The original ABC version of Family Feud was hosted by Richard Dawson from 1976 through 1985. Three years later the game show returned to the air on CBS (and then syndication) with Ray Combs as its host. Combs was originally a comedian who was successful as a warm-up act for studio audiences at TV tapings. His favorable reputation once got him a stand-up gig on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. When Family Feud was resurrected, Combs was inevitably compared to Richard Dawson--usually unfavorably. When Mark Goodson, Family Feud's creator, died in 1993, his son took control of the show. With ratings noticeably falling, it was announced that Combs would be replaced by old favorite Richard Dawson in 1994. At the end of the final Family Feud that Combs hosted, he left the stage immediately after he said goodbye--instead of mingling with the competing families, as was the custom. Combs never recovered from losing the show. A car accident caused a spinal injury that put him in constant pain. The comedy clubs he owned closed; he suffered major financial losses and lost his home. His wife of 18 years left him. Displying suicidal tendencies, Combs was hospitalized shortly after his 40th birthday. Not long after his release, police were called to Combs' home which he was violently trashing. He was taken to a mental institution. A short time later Combs committed suicide by hanging himself with his bed linen. In a weird coincidence, Richard Dawson died 16 years to the day that Ray Combs did.
Tags: Ray  Combs  suicide  game  show  host 
Added: 24th July 2010
Views: 6978
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Whose Eyes Are These 3 Whos Eyes Are These 3
Tags: whos  eyes  are  these  three 
Added: 25th July 2010
Views: 1163
Rating:
Posted By: MiscVideos78rpm

Pages: 19 20 21 22 23 24 [25] 26 27 28 29 30 31 of 45 | Random