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Bobby Fischer and Bob Hope Shortly after Bobby Fischer's famous victory over Boris Spassky to win the world chess championship in 1972, the 29-year-old Fischer--who was widely regarded as a Cold War hero in the western world--appeared on a Bob Hope special in this terrific skit. (Listen to the long ovation he gets when he first appears!) Fischer showed unexpected but wonderful humor, comedic timing, and an endearing personality. Sadly, those personal traits wouldn't last long in Fischer's real life.
Tags: Bobby  Fischer  Bob  Hope  chess  comedy  skit 
Added: 16th May 2017
Views: 1062
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Posted By: Lava1964
Egad! Chess Computer Beats World Champ May 11, 1997 saw one of the most important milestones in human history occur. Strangely, it was attained at the expense of humans. On that date in New York City, Garry Kasparov, the reigning world chess champion and one of the greatest players of all time, lost the deciding game of a six-game series to an IBM computer nicknamed Deep Blue. Kasparov resigned after only 19 moves, giving Deep Blue the match with a record of two wins, one loss, and three draws. The previous year, Kasparov had beaten an inferior version of Deep Blue four games to two in a series played in Philadelphia. To those in the computer industry, the triumph of Deep Blue was a cause for celebration. To many chess followers and ordinary folks, however, the result was ominous: Artificial intelligence had surpassed one of the great minds in human history. Here is a six-minute video about the 1997 event.
Tags: chess  Deep  Blue  computer  Garry  Kasparov 
Added: 20th May 2017
Views: 1371
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tennis Champs - 1900 to 1952 This seven-minute documentary film (sponsored by Dunlop tennis balls!) shows numerous tennis champions in action from 1900 to 1952. People who never saw the game played with wooden racquets--and those who did--ought to enjoy this.
Tags: tennis  stars   
Added: 27th August 2017
Views: 1002
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Gordon Griffith - First Movie Tarzan Most film history sources will list Elmo Lincoln as the first actor to play Tarzan on screen (in the 1918 silent film Tarzan of the Apes). That's not entirely true. In that same silent film, a 10-year-old boy named Gordon Griffith played the young Tarzan well before Lincoln appeared on the screen. It was a challenging role for the boy actor. Griffith was required to do his own climbing and acrobatic stunts and interact with live chimpanzees--which he did excellently. True to the Edgar Rice Burroughs book, Tarzan wore no clothes as a youth, so most of Griffith's scenes were shot with him totally nude. There was no national film code in 1918, but some scenes that showed too much of Griffith from the front were cut by local censors, including those in Chicago. Thus the public domain prints of the movie vary in length and in the amount of time Griffith was on the screen. Griffith, who like Tarzan lost both his parents at a young age, spent most of his life in the movie industry. He died in 1958 of a heart attack at the age of 51.
Tags: first  film  Tarzan  Gordon  Griffith 
Added: 20th November 2017
Views: 1110
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Posted By: Lava1964
Scofflaw - Prize-Winning Prohibition Word During America's Prohibition years, violations of the Volstead Act (which outlawed the sale, transportation, and manufacture of alcoholic beverages) were widespread. In 1924, an ardent Massachusetts prohibitionist named Delcevare King offered a $200 prize to anyone who could create a new word that would heap shame the lawless drinkers and those who enabled them. Two entrants--both from Massachusetts--named Henry Dale and Kate Butler each came up with the same winning word: scofflaw. It was clever a combination of the verb scoff (meaning to mock, deride or ridicule) and, of course, law. Dale and Butler split the $200 prize. The word did catch on and, over the years, scofflaw has expanded its meaning to encompass those who willfully break any law--not just liquor statutes.
Tags: Prohibition  scofflaw  contest  lexicography 
Added: 7th December 2017
Views: 1190
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
10cc - I 'I'm Mandy, Fly Me' by Eric, Graham and Lol begins with the hook-line from 'Clockwork Creep' (on second album 'Sheet Music') and an airplane flying overhead before being swiped aside by a fat bass line, exotic synthesiser sound effects, a vocoder apparently whispering 'amazing grace' and whistling. We find out later that the airplane has crash-landed in the water, with the narrator thrown out of the plane (his first line is that he's 'on the outside looking in') but rather than sound petrified or angry, the narrator bobbing in the water is ecstatic. The poster he sees on the side of the aircraft, of an air-hostess named Mandy, 'with a smile as bright as sunshine' causes him to hallucinate (or so it seems) and takes him out of himself ('The world was spinning like a ball, and then it wasn't there at all!') Mandy gives him the 'kiss of life' that saves him, his addled brain setting off on a journey of exotic acoustic guitars and psychedelic effects that ends only when he's pulled from the wreckage; he asks for Mandy but she's not there. A love song to an imaginary person, created by a situation so intense and extreme that the 'real essence' of life comes into sharp contrast, 'Mandy' is balancing a lot of things for a humble catchy single. For a start we don't know who to believe: the narrator is clearly awake enough to realise that what's happening to him seems like a film (Mandy acts 'just like the girl in Dr No, no no no') and yet when he tells his rescuers later that it might have all been in his head they tell him 'no no no no' and that she was was real, yet currently missing - do they mean this? Or is that simply a ruse to keep him awake and conscious in the hope that the pair might be reunited? (note the sheer amount of denies in each of those two lines, the sort of things you do when you're lying to someone). The key line of this song is 'if your chance would you take it?' - would you be prepared to create a whole new life for yourself in your mind to keep yourself alive? And if you did, what would happen to you afterwards when you realised you were making it all up? It's interesting in this context that the band chose an 'air hostess' as their 'exotic woman' (the first in a whole sequence of imaginary confident Eric Stewart girls who'll end up seducing him on subways and all sorts in albums to come): air hostesses never seem quite real anyway, what with all that make-up and being made up to look the same. This clearly isn't a 'real' woman: she's the sort you see everywhere if you travel by plane a lot and even that name - Mandy - isn't a common one amongst 'real' people, though it's used a lot in books. The result is a fourth straight song in a row that's easy to admire and yet there's something difficult to fall in love with compared to earlier classic 10cc singles: there's too many questions and not enough answers for this to be an 'easy ride', with the sudden switch of gears every time the band break out for another instrumental making this song less easy on the ears than, say, 'I'm Not In Love' or 'Rubber Bullets'. Still, this is a lot of people's favourite 10cc song for a reason: its a love song told with such a radical twist that no one on first hearing could have heard it coming (if they'd understood it at all), traditionally loved by 'true' fans (although interestingly co-writer Lol Creme wasn't one of them; it was this song he quoted as evidence that the band were growing stale). In actuality 'Mandy' is a clever hybrid of catchy commercialism and bonkers uniqueness that couldn't possibly have been thought up by another band, but there are better mixtures of the same ingredients around, even on this same album.
Tags: 10cc,  Pop  Music,  Rock  Music,  1976 
Added: 11th August 2018
Views: 957
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Posted By: Maitlandsplace
Vanishing TV Character- Larry Mondello Robert (Rusty) Stevens played Larry Mondello in 67 episodes of the first three seasons of Leave It To Beaver between 1957 and 1960. That meant he appeared in approximately 2/3 of those 102 shows. Larry was Beaver's best buddy. Good-natured, obese, but not the brightest kid on the planet, Larry often led Beaver into various messes. We never saw Larry's father, but his harried mother (played by Madge Blake) was constantly threatening Larry with the consequences of his iron-fisted pop laying down the law on him once he got home from another business trip. After the 1959-60 season, however, Larry just vanished from the sitcom. According to some reports, Rusty Stevens' father took a job in Pennsylvania. Thus the Stevens family was suddenly uprooted from California, which effectively ended Rusty's TV career. However, a few reports--including comments made by Barbara Billingsley (who played June Cleaver) late in her life--indicate that Stevens' mother was an insufferable stage mom whose presence and antics rankled the producers. Eventually the brains behind the show had had enough of her and decided abruptly to drop Larry Mondello from the show.
Tags: Larry  Mondello  Leave  It  to  Beaver  Rusty  Stevens 
Added: 26th October 2018
Views: 1079
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Posted By: Lava1964

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