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Ruffian Last Race - 1975 Generally considered the greatest filly of all time, Ruffian won her first ten races by an average of 8.5 lengths. A fast starter, she never trailed at any interval in any of her 10 races. Some horse racing insiders dared to say Ruffian had the potential to be better than 1973 Triple Crown winner Secretariat. Ruffian's eleventh and final race was run at Belmont Park on July 6, 1975. It was a match race between Ruffian and that year's Kentucky Derby winner, Foolish Pleasure. In the past, the two horses had shared the same jockey, Jacinto Vasquez. Vasquez chose to ride Ruffian in the match race, believing her to be the better of the two horses. (Bettors agreed; Ruffian was a 2:5 favorite.) Braulio Baeza rode Foolish Pleasure. The "Great Match" was heavily anticipated and attended by more than 50,000 spectators, with an estimated television audience of 20 million. As she left the starting gate Ruffian hit her shoulder hard before straightening herself. The first quarter-mile was run 22 and 1⁄5 seconds, with Ruffian ahead by a nose. Little more than a furlong later, Ruffian was in front by half a length when both sesamoid bones in her right foreleg snapped. Vasquez tried to pull her up, but the filly wouldn't stop. She went on running, pulverizing her sesamoids, ripping the skin of her fetlock, tearing her ligaments until her hoof was flopping uselessly. Vasquez said it was impossible for him to stop her. She still tried to run and finish the race. She was immediately attended to by a team of four veterinarians and an orthopedic surgeon, and underwent an emergency operation lasting three hours. When the anesthesia wore off after the surgery, she thrashed about wildly on the floor of a padded recovery stall as if still running in the race. Despite the efforts of numerous attendants, she began spinning in circles on the floor. As she flailed about with her legs, she repeatedly knocked the heavy plaster cast against her own elbow until the elbow, too, was smashed to bits. The vet that treated her said that her elbow was shattered and looked like a piece of ice after being smashed on the ground. The cast slipped, and as it became dislodged it ripped open her foreleg all over again, undoing the surgery. The medical team, knowing that she would probably not survive more extensive surgery for the repair of her leg and elbow, euthanized her shortly afterward. She was buried at Belmost Park with her nose facing the finish line.
Tags: Ruffian  horse  racing 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 2225
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Posted By: Lava1964
1st Man On Moon Neil Armstrong Passes At Age 82 Former U.S. astronaut, Neil Armstrong, the first man on the moon, has died at the age of 82, NBC News reported on Saturday. Armstrong underwent a heart-bypass surgery earlier this month to relieve blocked coronary arteries. As commander of the Apollo 11 mission, Armstrong became the first human to set foot on the moon on July 20, 1969. It was Armstrong who coined the now famous expression, "That's one small step for [a] man. One giant leap for mankind" as he first set foot on the surface of the moon.
Tags: Neil  Armstrong  First  Man  on  the  Moon  NASA  moon  astronaut  Apollo  11  July  20,  1969     
Added: 25th August 2012
Views: 1625
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Posted By: Old Fart
Ali-Liston Phantom Punch Fight - 1965 Perhaps the most controversial fight in boxing history: Ali-Liston II in Lewiston, ME on May 25, 1965. Ali (then Cassius Clay) had upset Liston on February 25, 1964 in Miami to win the world heavyweight title. The rematch, scheduled for Boston, was delayed by a few months because Ali needed emergency hernia surgery. By the time Ali had healed, he was tremendously unpopular because of his ties with the Black Muslims. Liston had connections in organized crime. Boston wanted no part of the fight, so it was moved to a high school hockey arena in Lewiston. Rumors that something odd would happen circulated before the fight. Watch Ali's famous "phantom punch" knock out Liston, a man who had never been floored before. Some people think it is a perfect punch. Others think Liston took a dive. Also watch ex-champ Jersey Joe Walcott botch the refereeing. Ali never goes to a neutral corner, yet Liston is somehow counted out. Ali wasn't exactly a one-punch knockout artist. He only had two first-round knockouts in his pro career. Renowned sports writer Red Smith, one of many respected journalists who maintained the fight was fixed, said, "I saw the punch; it wouldn't have crushed a grape."
Tags: boxing  Ali  Liston  phantom  punch  Lewiston 
Added: 26th October 2012
Views: 3265
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jack Klugman Passes At Age 90 Jack Klugman, the three-time Emmy Award-winning actor best known for his portrayals of slovenly sportswriter Oscar Madison on TV's “The Odd Couple” and the title role of the murder-solving medical examiner on “Quincy, M.E.,” died Monday at his home in Woodland Hills. He was 90. Klugman had been in declining health for the last year, his son Adam said. He had withdrawn from a production of “Twelve Angry Men” at the George Street Playhouse in New Brunswick, N.J., in Marchfor undisclosed health reasons. He had undergone successful surgery for cancer of the larynx in 1989.
Tags: Jack  Klugman  The  Odd  Couple    Quincy,  M.E.     
Added: 25th December 2012
Views: 1264
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Posted By: Old Fart
Bill Cullen Secret Disability The affable Bill Cullen is largely considered one of the greatest TV game show hosts ever. (One poll lists him as THE greatest.) Witty and charming, Cullen was a fixture as a game show host and as a regular panelist on I've Got a Secret for years. One source claims he earned $300,000 in 1958--an extraordinary sum for that era. During his impressive broadcasting career which spanned from radio sports commentary in 1942 to his umpteenth TV game show gig in 1986, Cullen hid an obvious physical disability: As a toddler in 1921 he had been stricken by polio. As a teen he was further crippled in a motorcycle mishap. The end result was that Cullen had severe mobility issues until the day he died. As was the norm at the time, the TV networks did their best to hide Cullen's disability as a kindness to him. Every game show he hosted he was never shown walking to his place; he was always already seated behind a podium and stayed that way for the show's duration. On July 9, 1961 he was a mystery guest on the original What's My Line. Usually the WML mystery guest would be shown signing in and then walking a few feet to sit beside host John Daly. When Cullen entered, the camera focused on the blindfolded panelists until he was seated--which must have puzzled millions of viewers that night. Mel Brooks related a horribly awkward story about a time he appeared on the Cullen-hosted game show Eye Guess in the late 1960s. At the end of the tapings, Brooks walked toward Cullen's desk to thank him for having him on. Cullen walked towards Brooks with his arms flailing and his feet turned over at the ankles. Brooks thought Cullen was doing a deliberately comical walk, so Brooks mimicked it! Brooks was aghast when someone shouted that Cullen was disabled. Cullen, however, laughed loudly and told Brooks he was glad someone finally had the courage to poke fun at him. Cullen said he always felt self-conscious about the special treatment he received. Cullen also suffered through pancreatic surgery in the late 1960s. He was never as robust looking afterwards. A lifelong smoker, Cullen succumbed to lung cancer in 1990 at age 70.
Tags: Bill  Cullen  polio  TV  host  disability 
Added: 18th June 2015
Views: 8381
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Posted By: Lava1964
Brien Taylor - Pitching Bust Brien Taylor was one of the most hyped amateur pitching prospects ever. Born in Beaufort, North Carolina, Taylor attended East Carteret High School. In his senior season, Taylor threw 88 innings, striking out 213 hitters while walking 28. His fastball often hit 98 and 99 mph. In 2006, agent Scott Boras claimed Taylor was the best high school pitcher he had ever seen. The New York Yankees selected Taylor with the first overall selection in the 1991 MLB draft and offered him $300,000 to sign a minor league contract, the typical amount given to the first overall draft choice at that time. However, Boras, acting as an advisor, told the Taylor family the previous year's top-rated high school pitcher, Todd Van Poppel, had gotten than $1.2 million to sign with the Oakland Athletics. Taylor held out for a three-year $1.2-million deal. He eventually signed for $1.55 million the day before he was to begin classes at a local junior college. The Yankees hoped Taylor would be the next Dwight Gooden and pitch in the majors at age 19. However Taylor needed to improve his pickoff move to first base, so he was assigned to the team's farm system. In 1992 Taylor was 6-8 for the Class A Fort Lauderdale Yankees, with a 2.57 earned run average and 187 strikeouts in 161 innings. The next year, as a 21-year-old with the Double-A Albany-Colonie Yankees, Taylor went 13-7 with a 3.48 ERA and had 150 strikeouts in 163 innings. Baseball America named him the game's best prospect and he was expected to pitch for the Triple-A Columbus Clippers of the International League in 1994 and start for the Yankees in 1995. On December 18, 1993 Taylor suffered a dislocated left shoulder and torn labrum while defending his brother in a fistfight. In the scuffle, Taylor fell on his pitching shoulder. Dr. Frank Jobe, a well-known orthopedic surgeon, called Taylor's injury one of the worst he'd seen. Taylor was never the same pitcher again. When he returned to baseball after surgery, his fastball was noticeably slower and he was unable to throw a curveball for a strike. Taylor spent the bulk of the remainder of his professional baseball career struggling at the Single-A level. Taylor bounced around different MLB farm teams until retiring in 2000. After baseball, Taylor moved to Raleigh and worked as a UPS package handler and later as a beer distributor. He fathered five daughters. By 2006, he was working as a bricklayer with his father. In January 2005, police charged Taylor with misdemeanor child abuse for allegedly leaving four of his children--none over 11--alone for more than eight hours. He didn't show up for his court date, and at one point there were four outstanding warrants for his arrest. According to financial records, he was earning $909 per month. In March 2012, Taylor was charged with cocaine trafficking after undercover narcotics agents purchased a large quantity of cocaine and crack cocaine from him over a period of several months. He was federally indicted on cocaine trafficking charges in June 2012. Taylor pled guilty in August 2012 and was sentenced to 38 months in prison, followed by three years' supervised release.
Tags: baseball  pitcher  Brien  Taylor 
Added: 4th March 2013
Views: 2693
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Posted By: Lava1964
Edward R Murrow Stamp Controversy This commemorative postage stamp honoring the late great journalist Edward R. Murrow was somewhat controversial when it was released to the public in 1994. Why? It was based on a photograph of Murrow in which he was holding a cigarette. The cigarette was conveniently omitted from the image when the stamp was created, irking a few people who knew the chain-smoking Murrow was seldom seen without a cigarette in his hand. (Murrow routinely smoked 65 cigarettes a day, claimed he couldn't go without one for more than 30 minutes, had surgery in 1963 to remove a blackened lung, and died in 1965 of lung cancer.)
Tags: censored  postage  stamp  Edward  Murrow 
Added: 16th July 2014
Views: 950
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Posted By: Lava1964
Theodore Roosevelt - Near Fatal Carriage Accident On September 3, 1902, U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt and several other prominent politicians came within inches of being killed by a speeding trolley car in Pittsfield, MA. The president, riding in a horse-drawn carriage, was on his way to deliver a speech when the accident occurred. The carriage was knocked about 40 feet upon impact. Secret Service agent William Craig was fatally injured, becoming the first Secret Service agent killed in the line of duty. Roosevelt was knocked from the carriage and landed face first upon the street. He suffered superficial wounds to his face and leg. (The seriousness of Roosevelt's injuries was probably understated. Roosevelt's leg wound became infected and abscessed. He required surgery and was confined to a wheelchair for a short time. Although the leg wound healed completely, Roosevelt was bothered by the aftereffects of his injury for the rest of his life.) David J. Pratt, the driver of the carriage containing the president, was severely injured. George B. Cortelyou, Secretary to the President, was severely bruised. Winthrop Murray Crane, Governor of Massachusetts, and George P. Lawrence, Representative in Congress from the First Massachusetts district, escaped with only a few bruises. All were in the carriage with Mr. Roosevelt. A newspaper account said, "Under the sunniest of September skies the distinguished party was driving through the Berkshire Hills in a landau drawn by four white horses, the reins handled by Pratt, the President and his companions going from Dalton to Lenox. The carriage was struck squarely just behind the box on which Pratt and Craig were sitting. The vehicle was hurled 40 feet across the road. Craig was instantly killed and ground under the heavy machinery of the car into an unrecognizable mass. The President was thrown into the air and landed on the right side of his face in the roadway. Mr. Cortelyou was thrown out and almost rendered unconscious. Gov. Crane, who, next to Craig, was the nearest to the immediate danger line, was thrown out, but...escaped with only slight bruises." No one on the trolley was injured. According to reports, the trolley was speeding in an attempt to get to its destination ahead of Roosevelt's carriage. Euclid Madden was the trolley car's motorman. He received a six-month prison term for his role in the accident. James Kelley was the trolley car's conductor. In 2002, on the hundredth anniversary of the accident, the Secret Service held a special ceremony at agent Craig's grave where a marker was placed.
Tags: Theodore  Roosevelt  1902  accident  carriage  trolley 
Added: 16th September 2014
Views: 5039
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Posted By: Lava1964
Al Molinaro aka Al on Happy Days Passes Al Molinaro, who played the beloved chef at the drive-in on "Happy Days" ... died in a California hospital on Friday. Molinaro's son confirmed the actor's death Al had very bad gall stones, but Al elected not to have surgery due to his age. He was 96.
Tags: Al  Molinaro  Al  on  Happy  Days  Al  Delvecchio   
Added: 31st October 2015
Views: 857
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Posted By: Old Fart
Eagles Guitarist Glenn Frey Passes at 67 A message on THE EAGLES website confirms that founding member/guitarist GLENN FREY has died at the age of 67. FREY had surgery in NOVEMBER and has been suffering from intestinal issues for months. He relapsed before the holidays, forcing THE EAGLES to pull out of their KENNEDY CENTER HONORS appearance in DECEMBER. "GLENN fought a courageous battle for the past several weeks but, sadly, succumbed to complications from Rheumatoid Arthritis, Acute Ulcerative Colitis and Pneumonia," the message stated. "The FREY family would like to thank everyone who joined GLENN to fight this fight and hoped and prayed for his recovery. Words can neither describe our sorrow, nor our love and respect for all that he has given to us, his family, the music community & millions of fans worldwide."
Tags: Eagles  Glen  Frey  Hotel  California  You  Belong  To  The  City  Desperado  Rock  And  Roll  Classic  Rock 
Added: 18th January 2016
Views: 910
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Posted By: Steve

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