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Got Scrubs this milk ad has three of my favorite characters from the sitcom "Scrubs." The show stars Zach Braff, Sarah Chalke, Donald Faison, John C. McGinley, Judy Reyes, Ken Jenkins,and Neil Flynn. "A visit to Sacred Heart Hospital, a fictional teaching hospital, is sure to be a surreal, comedic trip. Expect inner monologues, slapstick situations and occasional musical interludes, all mixed in with poignant scenes of how doctors deal with real medical issues."
Tags: tv  sitcom  scrubs  zach  braff  sarah  chalke  donald  faison  john  mcginley  judy  reyes  ken  jendins  neil  flynn  got  milk  ad 
Added: 12th July 2007
Views: 2568
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Posted By: Roxie
Linus the Lionhearted Opening I'll stick with todays theme of Saturday Morning Cartoons!
Tags: Linus  the  Lionhearted  Opening 
Added: 27th July 2007
Views: 3093
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Posted By: Freckles
Cover Girl Lipstick Ad remember the frosted white lipsticks?
Tags: ad  cover  girl  lipstick 
Added: 15th August 2007
Views: 2798
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Posted By: Roxie
Andrews Sisters  Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy Ok, I'll stick with the WWII theme today!
Tags: Andrews  Sisters    Boogie  Woogie  Bugle  Boy 
Added: 19th August 2007
Views: 2721
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Posted By: Old Fart
Josephine The Plumber for Comet God Bless Her! She's stick kicking at the age of 81 !
Tags: Josephine  The  Plumber  for  Comet  Commercial 
Added: 1st September 2007
Views: 10623
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Posted By: Freckles
Did This Scare You Out of the Water For anyone who hasn't seen this film, Jaws is a 1975 thriller directed by Steven Spielberg, based on Peter Benchley's best-selling novel inspired by the Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916. Jaws bears similarities to several literary and artistic works, most notably Moby-Dick by Herman Melville. The character of Quint strongly resembles Captain Ahab, the obsessed captain of the Pequod who devotes his life to hunting a sperm whale. Quint's monologue reveals his similar vendetta against sharks, and even his boat, the Orca, is named after the only natural enemy of sharks. A direct reference to these similarities may be found in the original screenplay, which introduced Quint by showing him watching the film version of Moby-Dick. His laughter throughout made people get up and leave the theater (Wesley Strick's screenplay for Cape Fear featured a similar scene). However, the scene from Moby-Dick could not be licensed from Gregory Peck, the owner of the rights. The final scenes of the film, in which the men chase the shark and try to harpoon it with flotation barrels, parallel the chase for Moby-Dick in the novel. We have this in our library and watch it usually once a month. There's something about this film that sticks in my memory, and no, I never went back into the water.
Tags: jaws  peter  bvenchley  steven  speilberg  films  1975 
Added: 28th September 2007
Views: 2592
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Posted By: Sophia
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 3122
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Posted By: Lava1964
Early Muppet Commercials In the 60's, the most popular of Jim Henson's commercials was a series for the local Wilkins Coffee company in Washington, D.C., in which his Muppets were able to get away with a greater level of slapstick violence than might otherwise have been acceptable with human actors. The first seven-second commercial for Wilkins was an immediate hit and was syndicated and reshot by Henson for local coffee companies across the United States. He ultimately produced more than 300 coffee ads.
Tags: jim  henson  muppets  wilkins  coffee  commercials 
Added: 21st November 2007
Views: 3262
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Posted By: Sophia
Polyester leisure suit The ultimate men's fashion statement from the 1970s: the much-maligned polyester leisure suit! Polyester was first developed by British researchers during the Second World War. It became a consumer item in 1963 when an Illinois chemist named Delbert Meyer came up with a better way of producing the material. The new threads were blended with natural fibers to create clothing that almost felt like cotton or wool but was washable and wrinkle resistant. Cut from rolls of spongy double-knitted polyester, leisure suits came in all variety of colours: earth tones, blues, racing green, maroon, and the entire spectrum of pastel hues. Airless and horribly uncomfortable in hot and humid weather, polyester leisure suits clung to the wearer's arms and legs. The highly flammable synthetic melted when it burned and stuck to its wearer like napalm. Upper-class men were not impressed, and preferred to stick to their genuine wools, silks and cottons. One fashion writer declared, 'Leisure suits were just too democratic. They made everybody look like a bus driver.'
Tags: polyester  leisure  suit 
Added: 22nd November 2007
Views: 3297
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Posted By: Lava1964
Funny 1927 Lifebuoy Soap Ad No wonder her boyfriends don't stick around--Janet has B.O.! But have hope, Janet! Lifebuoy soap can rescue you from unpleasant body odor and restore your social life! (Apparently this 1927 ad is credited for introducing the term B.O. into common usage.)
Tags: Lifebuoy  Soap  ad 
Added: 28th November 2007
Views: 2040
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Posted By: Lava1964

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