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Bobby Hebb  Sings SUNNY WHAT A SONG and WHAT A VOICE. This Is One Of Those One Hit Wonders. Written and preformed by Bobby Hebb.
Tags: The  Sixties,  Sunny,  Bobby  Hebb,  Song,   
Added: 1st February 2009
Views: 1829
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Posted By: mia_bambina
Sir Douglas Quintet   Shes About a Mover 1965 In 1965, the Sir Douglas Quintet was formed and the group's name was chosen in an effort to make the band seem British to benefit from the British invasion. This image had its problems, particularly Doug Sahm's Texas accent and that two fifths of the band were of Mexican origin. The band had a top 20 US hit with the song "She's About a Mover" and a number of lesser hit over the years. The SDQ broke up after a bust for marijuana possession in Corpus Christi, TX, and Doug moved to San Francisco, forming the Honkey Blues Band before reforming the new SDQ with a new lineup was resigned and they released the successful single and album "Mendocino". The record contained the song "At the Crossroad" with the legendary Doug Sahm line "You just can't live in Texas if you don't have a lot of soul".
Tags: sir  douglas  quintet  shes  about  a  mover  60s  music 
Added: 5th October 2007
Views: 2936
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Posted By: Naomi
 Reform School Girl    Trailer 1957 Juvenile Delinquent: REFORM SCHOOL GIRL 1957 "Thrill-Crazy! Speed-Crazy! Mad-At-The-World Crazy! Changing a nice kid into... REFORM SCHOOL GIRL!" "The Shocking True Story of Delinquent Girls!" A young girl's boyfriend steals a car and ends up involved in a hit-and-run accident. The only witness is his ex-girlfriend, so he has her framed on a car theft charge and sent to reform school. OH MY!!!
Tags: juvenile  delinquent  reform  school  girl  edd  byrnes  gloria  castillo  films 
Added: 11th October 2007
Views: 2430
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Posted By: Babs64
Featured Member- rickfmdj aka Rick DJ Ricky B from Chicago, Illinois. Rick has been a professional disc jockey for over 20 years. Rick’s career started as music director at his high school radio station and moved on through college radio as and radio engineer & on-air personality, obtaining a 4-hour air shift at a Chicago area radio station to becoming a member of the DJ Hot-Mix 12 in Chicago. From then Rick has opened & preformed at nightclubs, on radio and currently a Master of Ceremonies and Mobile Entertainer. Rick loves YRT and has told countless people of the site. Keep up the great job Steve!
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Added: 20th March 2009
Views: 2284
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Posted By: Steve
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 3047
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bloody Wednesday "Overshadowing September 11, 2001, another September day 139 years earlier remains the bloodiest single day in American history. On September 17, 1862, there were more than twice the number of fatalities that were suffered in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon . The number of casualties at Antietam was four times greater than American casualties at Normandy. more American soldiers died at Sharspburg (The Confederate name for the battle) than died in combat in all the other wars fought by this country in the nineteenth century combined:" — James McPherson, historian This day has come to be remembered as Bloody Wednesday Bloody Wednesday Sharpsburg - September 17, 1862 Photos .. Library of Congress The Alexander Gardner Collection John L. Smith http://flickr.com/photos/johnsmith/ Bethany L King http://flickr.com/photos/bethanyking/ and Carol Miller http://flickr.com/photos/cawarfel/ Film Clips "Glory" Tri-Star Pictures Directed by Edward Zwick Clip Editor: Drew McLaughlin http://youtube.com/profile?user=weben... Music Fife and Gun Old Friends Randy Edelman Going Home John Frizzell and Randy Edelman Preformed by Mary Fahl For more on The Battle of Antietam visit: http://www.nps.gov/archive/anti/home.htm http://www.civilwarhome.com/antietam.htm and http://aotw.org/ For information on Civil War Reenactments: http://www.cwreenactors.com/index.php http://www.sutler.net/eventlist.asp and http://www.ncwa.org/ Conceived and produced by Dale Caruso I want to add an additional site that I happened upon after completion and uploading of the project. I highly recommend this ... The Civil War Home Page http://www.civil-war.net/
Tags:     Antietam    Sharpsburg    Civil    War    reenactors    Glory     
Added: 27th September 2008
Views: 1915
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Posted By: dalecaruso
Brubaker 1980 TV trailer Robert Redford stars as a boat-rocking reform warden in the excellent 1980 drama BRUBAKER, also starring Yaphet Kotto, David Keith, Tim McIntire, Murray Hamilton, Jane Alexander, and Morgan Freeman.
Tags: Brubaker  Robert  Redford  Yaphet  Kotto  1980  movie  trailer  TV  television  prison 
Added: 16th May 2009
Views: 1354
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Posted By: robatsea
James Scott - Prisoner Boxer One of the most controversial professional athletes in history was James Scott--a light heavyweight boxer who was permitted to pursue a professional ring career from within the confines of a New Jersey state prison. By the time Scott was 28 years old he had spent about half his life in reformatories or prisons. After serving time in Rahway State Prison for robbery, Scott began boxing professionally in Miami under the tutelage of Angelo and Chris Dundee in the mid-1970s. He compiled a record of 11-0-1 before trouble found him again. A car he owned was linked to a robbery and murder. Scott maintained he had merely loaned the car to friends and was utterly unaware of their plans. Law enforcement didn't buy his story and Scott was returned to Rahway prison to serve a 30-year term for parole violation. While there Scott persuaded correctional officials that a prison boxing program would benefit everyone: Prisoners would be able to release their frustrations in an acceptable manner, they could pursue professional careers upon their releases, and the overall camaraderie among all prisoners would be improved. The state thought Scott's idea had merit. Remarkably, they also allowed Scott to resume his pro boxing career--as long as his opponents were willing to fight inside the prison. Scott--whose fitness regimen reputedly included 1,500 push-ups per day--became a force to be reckoned with. He earned a top-10 ranking from the World Boxing Association in an era when the light heavyweight division was very deep. NBC and CBS each aired Scott's bouts. ABC, however, kept its distance from Scott due to his criminal convictions. Scott's biggest win came over Eddie Gregory in 1977. Gregory was the number-one-ranked contender at the time and would eventually win the WBA championship. Whenever a Scott bout was shown on TV there were numerous complaints forwarded to the network from people who did not think an incarcerated person should be allowed to pursue a pro sports career in prison. The rival World Boxing Council agreed and never did rank Scott. Eventually the WBA dropped Scott from its rankings too, largely because he would most likely have to leave Rahway to fight for a championship. With no hope of ever fighting for a title, Scott's career waned. Scott lost two of his last three fights to end his career with a record of 19-2-1. Scott's final bout, a 1981 defeat, came at the hands of Dwight Braxton who would later win world titles in the light heavyweight and cruiserweight divisions. Ironically, Braxton had been a former Rahway inmate himself. Scott was finally released from prison in 2005 when he was in his mid-sixties.
Tags: boxing  James  Scott  prisoner 
Added: 6th July 2015
Views: 1004
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Posted By: Lava1964

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