Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Kazakh National Anthem Gaffe At an international shooting competition in Kuwait in March 2012, a major error in protocol occurred: During the medal ceremony, the gold medal winner from Kazakhstan was serenaded on the podium with the bogus Kazakh anthem from the 2006 satirical film Borat rather than her country's true national anthem. Maria Dmitrienko remained calm while listening to lyrics from the made-up song that insults other countries and touts Kazakhstan's "clean prostitutes." The movie portrays Kazakhs as backward and degenerates. Nevertheless, Dmitrienko left the stage smiling, possibly realizing what had happened. Kazakhstan's shooting team understandably demanded an apology. Ilyas Omarov of Kazakhstan's foreign ministry called the error "a scandal" and promised to undertake an investigation. The event's organizers apparently downloaded the wrong song from the Internet--and also got the Serbian anthem wrong too. This isn't the first time Kazakhstan's national anthem was messed up. At a ski event in northern Kazakhstan earlier that same month, a bit of "Livin' La Vida Loca" by Ricky Martin was played briefly in error before the true anthem played.
Tags: protocol  error  Kazakh  anthem  Borat 
Added: 27th July 2012
Views: 1521
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Olympic Protocol Gaffe - Korean Flag Error When play began at the Olympic women's soccer tourney on July 25, 2012 a major protocol error gummed up the works: North Korea's women's soccer team refused to take the field for its first Olympics match after an enormous diplomatic faux pax. The flag of their neighbor and ideological enemy South Korea was displayed alongside the players' names on the scoreboard at Hampden Park in Glasgow, Scotland instead of the North Korean flag. North Korea eventually played its match against Colombia, winning 2-0, but only after receiving permission from the office of Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un. The diplomatic kerfuffle began after team officials ordered the players back to their locker room, delaying the start of the game for more than an hour. They informed Olympic staff that no further action would be taken until guidance had been sought from North Korea's national soccer federation. That federation is officially headed by Kim Jong-un, the son of recently deceased leader Kim Jong-il. The level of control exerted by the North Korean government over every aspect of life in the country means that all major sporting decisions must be approved by the leadership. North Korea and South Korea are technically still at war. The "peace" to end the Korean War in 1953 is only an armistice--not an actual peace treaty. Organizers profusely apologized for the "human error." The mistake came, ironically, only a few days after British Olympic organizers guaranteed there would be no errors with flags, national anthems, and other areas of international protocol during the 2012 Games.
Tags: flag  error  Olympics  North  Korea 
Added: 27th July 2012
Views: 1688
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Party Lines Millennials will have trouble believing these ever existed, but at one time the majority of North American households did not have private telephone lines. Instead, they were serviced by party lines--basically one common telephone line that served numerous households. Party lines existed in urban areas where private lines were unavailable or expensive, but they are more frequently associated with rural areas where great distances separated neighbors and made private lines expensive for phone companies to install. As late as 1943, three-quarters of Pennsylvania's telephone customers had party lines. Party lines had certain advantages: Important community news could be relayed quickly to everyone who was connected, but of course there were major negatives too. Privacy was a virtual impossibility as anyone else who subscribed to the party line could eavesdrop on others' conversations. Also, there was the obvious problem of one subscriber hogging the line, preventing others from making a call. (If you look at Ann Landers-type newspaper columns from the first half of the 20th century, one person dominating the party line was a frequent complaint.) Phone companies responded by offering protocol tips to party-line users. Among the typical suggestions was a five-minute limit per call. Eavesdropping on others' phone conversations did lead to some amusing anecdotes. Criminal schemes were known to have been thwarted by listeners who heard crooks discussing their plans. One college football coach overheard his rival's plans on how to defeat his team in an upcoming game. Most telephone companies discontinued party lines toward the end of the 1970s.
Tags: party  lines  telephone  systems 
Added: 7th November 2016
Views: 1226
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: [1] of 1 | Random