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Pitfall Alex Trebek hosted this game show that was taped in Vancouver and later became infamous. The producers of Pitfall had big plans for this syndicated show, assuming it would get picked up by a multitude of American stations. It didn't, and many winners never collected their prizes. Alex also got stiffed. Last I heard he had never received a penny for his work as host and is still bitter about being stiffed by fellow Canadians.
Tags: Pitfall  game  show 
Added: 5th March 2008
Views: 1757
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Magnificent Marble Machine Here's a unique and forgotten game show: The Magnificent Marble Machine! Hosted by Art James, the show ran for 11 months on NBC starting on July 7, 1975. Designed to take advantage of the pinball craze, contestants were paired with celebrity partners to solve word puzzles, which, by some bizarre logic, entitled the winners to play an oversized pinball machine for cash and prizes! If the ball hit a bumper the contestant won a prize. Hey, I liked the show, but I was 11 years old at the time.
Tags: Magnificent  Marble  Machine 
Added: 17th December 2008
Views: 3244
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
McDonalds Monopoly Scandal 2001 Mathematicians knew something was very wrong with the Monopoly-themed contest at McDonald's restaurants in 2001. Against all odds, a hugely disproportionate number of big-prize winners were being claimed by residents of South Carolina, even though that state accounted for less than one percent of McDonald's sales nationally. An investigation was launched. It was quickly discovered that the game pieces for the contest were printed in South Carolina. Unscrupulous employees of the security company--who had been hired to ensure the game was on the level--had conspired with insiders at the printing company to illegally obtain the key Monopoly pieces for large prizes. Your eighth-grade math teacher was right: Probabilities and outcomes apply to the real world.
Tags: McDonalds  Monopoly  scandal 
Added: 16th February 2009
Views: 10611
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Jackpot Here's another 1970s game show I liked that didn't last too long: Jackpot. It aired on NBC from January 7, 1974 through September 26, 1975. Contestants had to solve riddles to win cash prizes. Geoff Edwards was the host. Sadly, only two episodes of this game show are known to exist on videotape!
Tags: Jackpot  NBC  game  show 
Added: 18th February 2009
Views: 2146
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Who Is This No. 2 Prizes: A comment on your channel, a friend invite, and maybe a subscription.
Tags: who  is  this  trivia  game  prize  miscvideos78rpm  guess  identify  risk 
Added: 25th July 2009
Views: 969
Rating:
Posted By: MiscVideos78rpm
Dance Marathon Craze During the 1920s and 1930s, dance marathons were a popular diversion in the United States. It is estimated that at their pinnacle, dance marathons were the main source of livelihood for 20,000 frequent competitors, officials, promoters, and musicians. Rules varied from place to place, but generally a couple stayed in the running for cash prizes as long as they kept moving on the dance floor. Only short respites were allowed every few hours for meals and rests. One event in New York City in 1937 lasted 481 hours--slightly more than 20 days! By the late 1930s, several cities and states had outlawed dance marathons because of the health dangers that accompanied sleep deprivation. This colorized photo from 1925 shows a typically exhausted couple.
Tags: dance  marathons 
Added: 16th August 2009
Views: 1995
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Whats The Event I have cropped the picture so that you can't see the main part of it. I will upload the whole picture when someone wins. Prizes: A friend invite, a channel comment, and maybe a subscription.
Tags: trivia  game  whats  the  event  prizes  games 
Added: 25th September 2009
Views: 1131
Rating:
Posted By: MiscVideos78rpm
Who Is This Prizes: A friend invite, a channel comment, and maybe a subscription.
Tags: prizes  who  is  this  trivia  games  game  show  prize  contest 
Added: 25th September 2009
Views: 1207
Rating:
Posted By: MiscVideos78rpm
Michael Larson Beats Press Your Luck Press Your Luck was a CBS daytime game show that ran from 1983 to 1986. It was one of the first game shows to use computer technology. The heart of the game revolved around a large computer-generated prize board. There were 18 'randomly arranged' panels. On average, 15 of the 18 panels contained cash or merchandise prizes. The other three were 'whammies.' If a player stopped the rotating board on a whammy, he lost everything. If a player kept accruing spins, he could keep pressing his luck and accumulate as much money and prizes as he dared. Enter Michael Larson, an out-of-work ice cream vendor from Ohio. Using his VCRs, Larson taped numerous episodes of Press Your Luck and screened them in slow motion. Larson's study habits paid huge dividends: He recognized that the board only generated five patterns. If a player was smart enough to recognize the patterns and time his presses accordingly, a small fortune could be amassed. In a May 1984 taping, Larson did just that. To the amazement of host Peter Tomarken, a studio audience, his two opponents, and CBS brass, Larson made 46 consecutive spins without hitting a whammy. (The odds of such a feat, if it were pure luck, are about 5000 to one.) At a time when most game show winners took home less than $10,000, Larson won $104,950 in cash, a sailboat, and trips to Kauai and the Bahamas-- for a total haul valued at $110,237. Larson's run of whammy-free presses took so long that CBS had to air the show over two episodes (on June 8 and 11). At first CBS was reluctant to award Larson his winnings, but they had no legal grounds to withhold Larson's loot. He had beaten the system fairly. Immediately afterward, the Press Your Luck board patterns were increased to 32 making it much less likely that anyone could memorize them. To see a condensed version of Larson in action, check out another post on this website: http://www.yourememberthat.com/media/14367/Michael_Larson_on_Press_Your_Luck/
Tags: Press  Your  Luck  Michael  Larson  game  show 
Added: 30th November 2010
Views: 2212
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Queen For A Day Total Television calls Queen For A Day, '...possibly the most maudlin game show ever broadcast'--and for good reason. Considered a forerunner of modern-day reality TV, QFAD was a successful radio program beginning in 1945 before airing on daytime television from 1956 through 1964. At the peak of the show's popularity in the late 1950s, NBC expanded it from 30 to 45 minutes to sell more commercials, at a then-premium rate of $4,000 per minute. QFAD opened with host Jack Bailey asking the largely female studio audience, 'Would YOU like to be queen for a day?' After this, the contestants were introduced and interviewed. Each contestant talked about recent financial and emotional hard times she had been through. The sob stories were rated on an applause meter. Bailey began each interview gently, asking the contestant first about her life and family, and maintaining a positive and upbeat response no matter what she told him. The interview climaxed with Bailey asking the contestant what she needed most and why she wanted to win the title of Queen for a Day. Often the request was for medical care or therapeutic equipment to help a chronically ill child, but sometimes it was as simple as the need for a hearing aid, a new washing machine, or a refrigerator. Many women broke down sobbing as they described their plights, and Bailey was always quick to comfort them and offer a clean white handkerchief to dry their eyes. The more pitiful the story a contestant had, the likelier the studio audience was to reach the applause meter's highest level. The winner, to the musical accompaniment of Pomp and Circumstance, would be draped in a sable-trimmed red velvet robe, given a glittering jeweled crown to wear, placed on a velvet-upholstered throne, and handed a dozen long-stemmed roses to hold as she wept, often uncontrollably, while her list of prizes was announced. The prizes began with the necessary help the woman had requested, but might include a vacation, a night on the town with her husband or escort, silver-plated flatware, an array of kitchen appliances, and a selection of fashion clothing. The losing contestants were each given smaller prizes; no one went away from the show without a meaningful gift. Bailey's trademark sign-off was 'This is Jack Bailey, wishing we could make every woman a queen--for every single day!' A 1970 short-lived syndicated revival of QFAD quickly fell into disfavor with viewers when it was revealed the 'contestants' were actually actresses.
Tags: Queen  For  A  Day  reality  TV  game  show 
Added: 24th February 2011
Views: 2048
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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