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Postmortem Photography It seems a little bit creepy today--well, actually it seems extremely creepy by modern standards--but it was quite common in the late 19th century to photograph your loved ones in lifelike poses after they had died! Photography was generally very expensive in the 19th century. Often families had no photographs of loved ones while they were alive. Accordingly, as part of a funeral ritual, the recently deceased person would be dressed, posed in a very lifelike position--much like the gentleman in this example--and his/her image was preserved for posterity. Frequently they were posed alongside siblings and parents as part of a family portrait. Because of the slow shutter speed of cameras in those days, dead people were actually the best subjects for photographers as they were guaranteed to stay still. Postmortem photography was surprisingly commonplace in Europe and North America (especially of dead children because childhood mortality rates were very high). It remained quite common until photography became cheaper and families were more likely to have photos of their relatives taken while they were still in the land of the living.
Tags: postmortem  photography 
Added: 9th March 2015
Views: 1139
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Posted By: Lava1964
Selfies In The 1920s Tags: Selfies  In  The  1920s  photography  photos  portraits  kodak  film 
Added: 20th July 2015
Views: 989
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Posted By: Cathy
14-Year-old Finds Lincoln Death Photo American history buffs were startled in September 1952 when it was announced that a banned photo of Abraham Lincoln lying in his coffin was discovered by a 14-year-old boy. Robert Lincoln, the eldest son of the assassinated president, had forbade any post-mortem photography of his father. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton had zealously enforced Robert's wishes and destroyed several such photos and their negatives. Enter young Ron Rietveld of Des Moines, IA 80-plus years later. As a preteen Lincoln buff he had precociously begun corresponding with Judge James W. Bollinger, one of the country's leading collectors of Lincoln memorabilia. When Bollinger died in 1951, he left his collection to the University of Iowa. The 13-year-old Rietveld wrote to the university for permission to attend the dedication ceremony for Bollinger's collection. As a friend of Bollinger, Rietveld was granted VIP status. At the ceremony Rietveld befriended many of the great Lincoln historians of the era, including Henry Pratt. Pratt and his wife were so impressed by the teenager that they invited him to come to their Springfield, IL home to see Lincoln's tomb and visit the research library on the grounds. While there, Rietveld was given free rein to examine the archival material. Purely by chance, Rietveld began looking through papers sent by the son of Edwin Stanton. To his surprise, Rietveld found a photo (shown here) of Lincoln lying in state in an open coffin. It was taken on April 24, 1865 in New York City--meaning that Stanton had curiously kept one of the photos he was supposed to have destroyed. Rietveld recognized the scene from an artist's rendition that had appeared in Collier's magazine. Rietveld alerted Pratt to his find. Pratt suspected the photo was authentic, but he reserved judgement until it could be positively verified. Rietveld was sworn to secrecy. Not even his parents knew about his remarkable find until the story was front-page news in the Des Moines Register. As one might expect, Rietveld became a history professor himself.
Tags: Lincoln  post-mortem  photo  coffin  Ronald  Rietveld 
Added: 20th July 2015
Views: 2107
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Posted By: Lava1964
Kodak Disc Camera Tags: Kodak  Disc  Camera  small  camera  film  disc  flash  photography  Kodak  Disc  4000 
Added: 26th December 2015
Views: 1063
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Posted By: pfc
Barbara Colby - Murdered TV Actress Thirty-six-year-old Barbara Colby's acting career was very much on the upswing in the summer of 1975 when her life was cut short for no apparent reason. She had appeared in occasional TV roles in some of the 1970s most prominent shows such as Medical Center, The FBI, Columbo, The Odd Couple, Gunsmoke, MacMillan & Wife and the Mary Tyler Moore Show. By 1975 she had earned a prominent role as the title character's boss in Phyllis (a spinoff of the Mary Tyler Moore Show). Colby's character was Julie Erskine, a proprietor of a San Francisco photography studio where Phyllis was employed. Three episodes of Phyllis had been taped when Colby and fellow acting colleague James Kiernan were gunned down in a seemingly random act of violence on July 24, 1975. Both had just left an acting class when they were fatally shot in a parking lot in Venice, CA. Colby died almost instantly. Kiernan lived long enough to give the police description of two males who had done the shooting, but he succumbed to his wounds shortly thereafter. Robbery was not a motive as nothing was taken from the two victims. The crime has never been solved.
Tags: Barbara  Colby  murdered  actress 
Added: 11th December 2017
Views: 1760
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Posted By: Lava1964

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