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Louella Parsons on Judy Garland i wish Louella Parsons "GOOD NEWS" from a 1949 MODERN SCREEN magazine had indeed been correct . . . she died twenty years later of an accidental overdose of barbiturates. . " WHAT IS really the matter with Judy Garland? That is the question hurled at me everywhere I go. All right, let's get at it. Judy is a nervous and frail little girl who suffers from a sensitiveness almost bordering on neurosis. It is her particular temperament to be either walking in the clouds with excitement or way down in the dumps with worry. The least thing to go wrong leaves her sleepless and shattered. She has never learned the philosophy of "taking it easy." Last year, when she was on the verge of a nervous breakdown, she got in the habit of taking sleeping pills -- too many of them -- to get the rest she had to have. I'm not revealing any secrets telling you that. It was printed at the time. But for a highly emotional and highly strung girl to completely abandon sedatives, as Judy attempted to do when she realized she was taking too many, puts a terrific strain on the nervous system. The trouble is, Judy does not take enough time to rest. The minute she starts feeling better she wants to go back to work. She cried like a baby when she learned she was not strong enough to make The Barkleys of Broadway with Fred Astaire so soon following The Pirate and Easter Parade. "I'm missing the greatest role of my career," she sobbed. With Judy -- each role is always the greatest. Sometimes I believe Judy's frail little form is packed with too much talent for her own good. She is an artist, and I mean ARTIST, at too many things. She sings wonderfully and dances almost as well. And as for her acting -- well, listen to what Joseph Schenk, one of the really big men of our industry and head of 20th Century Fox (not Judy's studio) has to say. I sat next to Joe the night we saw Easter Parade. He told me, "Judy Garland is one of the great artists of the screen. She can do anything. I consider her as fine an actress as she is a musical comedy star. There is no drama I wouldn't trust her with. She could play such drama as Seventh Heaven as sensitively as a Janet Gaynor or a Helen Mencken." And I agree with every word Joe said. I am happy to tell you as I report the Hollywood news this month that Judy is coming along wonderfully, resting and getting back the bloom of health. Soon we will have her back on the screen -- her long battle with old Devil Nerves behind her and forgotten."
Tags: modern  screen  magazine  judy  garland  louella  parsons 
Added: 6th September 2007
Views: 3096
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Posted By: Teresa
Philo Farnsworth Inventor of Television I'd bet that not one person in 100 knows who invented television. It was a teenage boy named Philo T. Farnsworth who came up with the design back in 1922. Here he is on I've Got A Secret in 1957. His secret stumps the panel.
Tags: Philo  Farnsworth 
Added: 25th November 2007
Views: 2222
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Posted By: Lava1964
Philo T. Farnsworth Inventor of TV Tags: philo      farnsworth      television      video      technology      game      show      science      history      invention      breakthrough      quantum      leap      electronic     
Added: 2nd March 2008
Views: 1470
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Posted By: pfc
Philo Farnsworth on Ive Got A Secret Tags: philo      farnsworth      television      video      technology      game      show      science      history      invention      breakthrough      quantum      leap      electronic     
Added: 2nd March 2008
Views: 1283
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Posted By: pfc
Archies Philosophy 70's not far from nowadays Yup!
Tags: Arch! 
Added: 11th March 2008
Views: 1724
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Posted By: Marty6697
Baseball and Football George Carlin, His Philosophy of the the two.
Tags: Funny 
Added: 15th March 2008
Views: 2559
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Posted By: Marty6697
Dan Quisenberry One of my favorite baseball personalities was the quotable Dan Quisenberry, ace relief pitcher for the Kansas City Royals--when the Royals had a good team. The submarine-style hurler recorded 244 career saves, but he was most fondly remembered for his offbeat sense of humor. One year in the Royals' press guide he listed his hobby as 'tinfoil chewing' and said his favorite thing about baseball was 'no homework.' Regarding baseball salaries, Quisenberry said, 'No man is worth another, and none is worth more than $12.95.' On the future, he noted, 'I've seen the future, and it's much like the present, only longer.' Diagnosed with brain cancer in 1998, Quisenberry was typically philosophical: 'I've had so many good things happen to me. So why not me?' He died later that same year at age 45.
Tags: Dan  Quisenberry  baseball 
Added: 23rd July 2008
Views: 1578
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ozzie Explains Women To Rick Tags: Ozzie  Explains  Women  To  Rick  tv    television    comedy    painting    rick    ozzie    harriet    nelson    psychology    philosophy    men    women    humor     
Added: 27th July 2009
Views: 2235
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Posted By: Laura
Carnegie Libraries Andrew Carnegie made a vast fortune in the steel industry. His philosophy was that a man should spend half his life acquiring wealth and the other half using it for good works. Accordingly, Carnegie financed the building of the astonishing total of 2,509 public libraries in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, and other countries. Carnegie's passion for libraries began at a young age. He saw the value of public libraries as places for learning and community centers. Cities or towns that wanted a Carnegie Library had to provide the building site and maintain the library after it was built. Carnegie's money paid for everything else. A carnegie library always had to have 'open stacks' so the public could browse, and it had to provide free service. Carnegie's foundation built libraries from 1885 to 1929. (Carnegie himself died in 1919 at age 84.) Many of these libraries are still in use today, such as the one pictured here in Grass Valley, California.
Tags: Andrew  Carnegie  libraries  philanthropy 
Added: 18th June 2010
Views: 1441
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Posted By: Lava1964
Washington Senators Last Game - 1971 The Washington Senators' 71st and last season in the American League came to a sad and strange end on September 30, 1971. Some 14,000 disenchanted fans came to RFK stadium one last time to see the home team play the New York Yankees in a meaningless contest. Many brought along insulting and obscene banners denouncing team owner Bob Short who had announced the team was relocating to Texas for the 1972 season. Love was showered on the players, though. Even the most mediocre Senators were given hearty cheers when they first came to bat. The loudest ovation was saved for slugging fan favorite Frank Howard who responded with a home run. However, things began to turn ugly in the eighth inning just after the Senators had taken a 7-5 lead. Here's Shirley Povich's account of what happened as it appeared in the next day's Washington Post: "As if in sudden awareness that the end of major-league baseball in Washington was only one inning way, the mood hardened. 'We want Bob Short!' was the cry that picked up in loud and angry chorus, and it was the baying-fury sound of a lynch mob. Then a swarm of young kids, squirts who wouldn't know what it had meant to have a big-league team all these years, or what it would mean to lose one, flooded onto the field from all points of the stands. A public address announcement warned that the home team could forfeit the game unless the field was cleared, and pretty soon the game resumed. It got as far as two out in the ninth, the Senators' 7-5 lead intact, no Yankee on base, when one young rebel from the stands set off again. He grabbed first base and ran off with it. Some unbelievers, undaunted by the warning of forfeit, cheered, and from out of the stands poured hundreds, maybe a couple of thousand fans. They took over the infield, the outfield, grabbed off every base as a souvenir, tried to get the numbers and lights from the scoreboard or anything else removable, and by their numbers left police and the four umpires helpless to intervene. The mad scene on the field, with the athletes of both teams taking refuge in their dugouts, brought official announcement of Yankees 9, Senators 0, baseball's traditional forfeit count almost since Abner Doubleday notched the first baseball score on the handiest twig at Cooperstown. But by then the crowd-mood was philosophical, 'So what?' Or more accurately, 'So what the hell?' The Senators were finished, even if the ball game wasn't."
Tags: baseball  riot  1971  Washington  Senators 
Added: 16th January 2012
Views: 5127
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Posted By: Lava1964

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