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Leopold and Loeb murder case 1924 One of the most despicable murder cases in the twentieth century was that of Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb, residents of suburban Chicago, who murdered 14-year-old Bobby Franks in 1924. Their motive: They wanted to kill for the thrill of it and commit the perfect crime. Both Leopold, age 20, and Loeb, age 19, were exceptionally brilliant students who considered themselves intellectual supermen. On May 21, 1924 they lured Bobby Franks (a distant relative of Loeb) into a rented car. Franks was bludgeoned with a chisel and suffocated with a sock. His body was dumped into a culvert in Gary, Indiana and doused with acid to make identification difficult. The culprits mailed a typed ransom note to Franks' parents indicating that Bobby had been kidnapped. However, Franks' body was found before any ransom could be paid. Also found near the body were a pair of eye glasses that fell from Loeb's pocket during the crime. The glasses were almost unique--only three pairs had been made by a certain optician--and they led the police to Loeb. The two young men, who were reputedly homosexual lovers, were questioned and their alibis discredited. Each eventually confessed his involvement in the crime, but insisted the other was responsible for the actual murder. They were brought to trial for murder and kidnapping. Their lawyer, the famous Clarence Darrow, entered pleas of guilty in order to avoid a jury deciding the twosome's fate--which likely would have been a death sentence. Instead Darrow argued with a judge to spare his guilty clients from the death penalty. Darrow gave a rousing 12-hour oration that spared his clients' lives. Instead Leopold and Loeb were each given life sentences plus 99 years. Loeb was murdered in prison in 1936. Leopold was pardoned in 1958 and died of a heart attack in 1971. Bobby Franks, often forgotten by history, remains 14 years old forever.
Tags: Leopold  Loeb  Franks 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 3137
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Posted By: Lava1964
World Cup 98 Visa Ad Sometimes words aren't needed... A blackout in Buenos Aires just when Argentina is about to shoot a penalty against Brazil in the World Cup Final... last minute.
Tags: world  cup  final  argentina  visa  commercial 
Added: 5th December 2007
Views: 1781
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Posted By: Sophia
Last Public Guillotine Execution 1939 Beginning in 1793, death by guillotine was the official method of capital punishment in France. Public executions were the norm and attracted large, enthusiastic crowds. The last criminal to be publicly executed in France was multiple murderer Eugen Weidmann who lost his head on June 17, 1939. His execution was clandestinely filmed by a spectator from his apartment window. (This photo is a frame of that film.) The wild exuberance of the crowd prompted the French government to cease all further public executions. Still, the death penalty remained on the books in France until 1981. The last guillotine customer was torture-murderer Hamida Djandoubi who assumed room temperature, away from the eyes of the public, on September 10, 1977.
Tags: capital  punishment  guillotine  France 
Added: 12th May 2009
Views: 4438
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Posted By: Lava1964
Stuart Pearce Redemption PK It is virtually unknown in the United States, but this is one of the great redemption moments in all sports: Stuart Pearce's penalty kick at Euro '96. At the 1990 World Cup tournament in Italy, England lost their semifinal versus West Germany when Pearce failed to score in a penalty shootout. Six years later, when England hosted Euro '96, the England-Spain quarterfinal went to a penalty shootout. Despite the baggage from his 1990 failure, Pearce bravely volunteered to take one of England's penalty kicks. His reaction upon scoring ran the gamut of emotions.
Tags: Stuart  Pearce  penalty  kick  redemption  soccer 
Added: 7th February 2014
Views: 1167
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Posted By: Lava1964
John McEnroe Defaulted at 1990 Australian Open On January 21, 1990, tennis great John McEnroe was defaulted from the Australian Open after accruing three code violations in his fourth-round match versus Mikael Pernfors. McEnroe was unaware that the rule had recently been changed regarding defaults. Previously it had taken four code violations for a player to be defaulted (with the penalties being warning, point, game, and finally default). The new rule eliminated the game penalty. Despite a career checkered with bad behavior, McEnroe's disqualification from the Australian Open was the only instance where his on-court deportment got him kicked out of a tourney. (He and doubles partner Peter Fleming once had to default a match at the U.S. Open when a traffic jam caused them to be late for a match.) Tellingly, McEnroe said in the post-match press conference, "It was bound to happen."
Tags: tennis  John  McEnroe  defaut  Australian  Open 
Added: 7th June 2014
Views: 1357
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Posted By: Lava1964
Georgia Tech Beats Cumberland 222-0 The worst rout in the history of American college football was administered by mighty Georgia Tech against tiny Cumberland College on October 7, 1916. The final score was 222-0. There were some extenuating circumstances. Cumberland had signed a contract a year in advance to play Georgia Tech in Atlanta in 1916, but discontinued its football program after the 1915 season. However, the contract with Tech included a hefty $3,000 forfeit penalty if Cumberland failed to put a team on the field against Tech. Instead of paying the fine, Cumberland threw together a team on short notice. The team never held a single practise. One player, a law student, recalled years later, 'We put a lot of faith in the clause about placing a team on the field. There was nothing in the contract requiring us to play well.' Tech coach John Heisman showed no mercy. His squad scored nine touchdowns in both the first and second quarters to lead 126-0 at halftime. Tech agreed to shorten the third and fourth quarters and only scored 14 more touchdowns. In all, Tech scored 32 touchdowns (and 30 conversions). Tech also amassed 1,650 yards rushing on just 40 attempts. Cumberland's rushing total was -96 yards. They did complete two passes, though. Tech did not attempt a pass all game. Most interesting stat: There were no first downs by either team. All of Tech's big plays went for touchdowns. Cumberland's biggest play was a 10-yard pass completion on a fourth-and-28 situation. Despite their historic defeat, the Cumberland players returned to their Lebanon, TN campus as heroes for saving their small school $3,000.
Tags: college  football  Georgia  Tech  Cumberland 
Added: 28th October 2009
Views: 4306
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Posted By: Lava1964
NBA Shot Clock Invented 1954 It was the innovation that saved professional basketball: The 24-second shot clock. Coach Howard Hobson came up with with the idea of a shot clock, but it was first used in 1954 in Syracuse, New York. There Danny Biasone, the owner of the National Basketball Association's Syracuse Nationals, experimented with a 24-second version during a scrimmage game. He then convinced the NBA to adopt it. In the pre-shot clock days, the NBA had problems attracting fans and television coverage. This was largely due to the stalling tactics used by teams once they took the lead. Without the shot clock, teams could pass the ball in the front court endlessly without penalty. If the team in the lead chose to stall, the trailing team was forced to commit fouls to get the ball back following the free throw. Low-scoring, boring games with many fouls were common. The most extreme case occurred on November 22, 1950, when the Fort Wayne Pistons defeated the Minneapolis Lakers 19-18. A few weeks later, the Rochester Royals and Indianapolis Olympians played a soporific six-overtime game with only one shot in each overtime. The NBA tried several rule changes in the early 1950s to speed up the game and reduce fouls before eventually adopting Biasone's idea. How did Biasone arrive at the strange figure of 24 seconds? According to Biasone, 'I looked at the box scores from games I enjoyed, games where they didn't screw around and stall. I noticed each team took about 60 shots. That meant 120 shots per game. So I took 48 minutes--2,880 seconds--and divided that by 120 shots. The result was 24 seconds per shot.' When the shot clock first came into vogue, it made players so nervous that it hardly came into play; players were generally taking fewer than 20 seconds to shoot. According to Syracuse player Dolph Schayes, 'We thought we had to take quick shots. But as time went on, we saw the inherent genius in Danny's 24 seconds. You could work the ball around for a good shot.'
Tags: NBA  shot  clock 
Added: 15th November 2009
Views: 3742
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Posted By: Lava1964
Foster Hewitt Canada's first pioneer sports broadcaster was diminutive Foster Hewitt. His first hockey broadcast was an amateur game between Toronto and Kitchener in 1923--which he did from the penalty box. He became the voice of the Toronto Maple Leafs on Hockey Night In Canada when its radio broadcasts began in 1931. For the next 40 years Hewitt's familiar voice was the most famous in Canada. He regularly began his broadcasts with the phrase, 'Hello, Canada...and hockey fans in the United States and Newfoundland.' Hewitt smoothly made the transition to television in 1952--and his TV broadcasts were still simulcast on radio until 1963. That year his son Bill took over the TV broadcasts; Foster continued hockey broadcasts on the radio until 1970. Hewitt was lured out of retirement to call the historic Canada-Russia series in 1972. He was given the Order of Canada that same year. Hewitt died in 1985 at the age of 82.
Tags: Foster  Hewitt  hockey  broadcaster 
Added: 7th January 2010
Views: 1420
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Posted By: Lava1964
North American Soccer League The North American Soccer League was supposed to be the 'next big thing' in sports. It lasted 17 seasons but it failed to dislodge the traditional team sports from their longtime perch as fan favorites. The league began in 1968 with the merger of two small pro leagues and lasted until 1984. At the peak of the NASL's popularity in the late 1970s, it had 24 teams. The New York Cosmos (who featured Pele and Franz Beckenbauer on their roster) sometimes drew 70,000 fans to Giants Stadium. However, the league average never exceeded 15,000 fans per game and some teams struggled to draw 5,000. By its last season, the NASL had dwindled to nine teams. By the time the final NASL game was played between the Chicago Sting and Toronto Blizzard, only three teams were solvent. To Europeans, the NASL was perceived as soccer's version of an elephants' graveyard where players long past their primes could extend their careers for sizable money. The Euro stars, despite their diminishing skills, accounted for large chunks of teams' payrolls that could have been better spent fostering North American talent. Traditionalists were also put off by the NASL's gimmicks to Americanize the sport: a liberalized offside rule, game clocks that counted downward instead of upward, penalty shootouts to break ties, and a crazy points system that rewarded goals scored as well as wins. In the end, the NASL managed to alienate traditional soccer fans while failing to attract new ones.
Tags: NASL  soccer 
Added: 12th April 2011
Views: 1422
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Posted By: Lava1964
Boston Bruins - 1972 Stanley Cup Champs I posted this on the CBC News website in Canada following the Boston Bruins' Stanley Cup championship on June 15, 2011. It got such a wonderful response that I thought I'd share it here too: It had been 14,279 days since captain Johnny Bucyk hoisted the Boston Bruins' last Stanley Cup on May 11, 1972. To put things in perspective... Richard Nixon was in the White House. America still had combat troops in Vietnam. If you bought a quarter's worth of candy, you could get sick eating it all. Pitchers still batted in the American League. There was no such thing as rap music or punk rock. Nobody considered the possibility of terrorist attacks at the Olympics. The NHL had 14 teams. Few players wore helmets. Some goalies didn't wear masks. Nobody seriously thought hockey players from the USSR were good. There were hardly any McDonald's Restaurants in Canada. There were very few Tim Hortons either. Archie Bunker was in his heyday. Television sets had rabbit ears. Nobody thought the world was in peril from global warming or climate change or whatever they're calling it this week. Lotteries were illegal in Canada. Arthur Godfrey Time had still been on the radio two weeks earlier. Calculators could perform four functions and cost $179. Most people had rotary telephones. Forget about DVD players--VCRs didn't exist. The idea of bottled water would have been laughable. Computers were enormous things that occupied entire rooms and did simple calculations using punch cards. Hardware meant hammers and wrenches. Software didn't mean anything. People still sent telegrams. Life Magazine was still around. Canada still had the death penalty. O.J. Simpson was a hero. The Lord's Prayer was recited in public schools. Nobody thought it was wrong. A new car cost $2500. Hockey cards were a dime a pack--and they came with pink bubble gum covered in powdered sugar. Bobby Orr was the greatest player in the NHL. (Thirty-nine years later he's still the greatest of all time.).
Tags: hockey  Boston  Bruins  1972  Stanley  Cup 
Added: 16th June 2011
Views: 3622
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Posted By: Lava1964

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