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LHOP - Centennial Finale Here's another favorite clip from Little House on the Prairie. It's the final six minutes of an episode titled Centennial. Here's the plot: As America's centennial approaches in 1876, few adults in Walnut Grove are in the mood to celebrate. They have just been informed of a tax hike made necessary to build an improved road system. Furthermore, newly arrived immigrants from Tsarist Russia, Yuli Pyatakoff and his family, are being evicted from their farm because they cannot pay the back taxes accrued by the previous owner. Everyone is grumpy about taxes and the government--until Yuli tells them how good they've got it.
Tags: LHOP  Centennial  episode 
Added: 10th November 2012
Views: 1557
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Death of Sam Cooke - 1964 Popular singer Sam Cooke is best remembered for his million-selling 1957 hit You Send Me. The married Cooke was something of a serial philanderer and died a rather unseemly death at age 33 on December 11, 1964, at the Hacienda Motel in Los Angeles from a fatal gunshot wound to the torso. The motel's manager, Bertha Franklin, said she shot Cooke in self-defense after he broke into her office and attacked her. However, the details of the case are still in dispute. Cooke's body was found in Franklin's apartment-office, clad only in a sports jacket and shoes, but no shirt, pants or underwear. The official police record states that Franklin fatally shot Cooke who had checked in earlier that evening with a young woman. Franklin claimed that Cooke had broken into the manager's office-apartment in a rage, wearing nothing but a shoe and a sports coat demanding to know the whereabouts of the woman who had accompanied him to the hotel only a few minutes earlier. Franklin told Cooke the woman was not in the office, but the enraged Cooke did not believe her. He violently grabbed her, demanding again to know the woman's whereabouts. According to Franklin, she grappled with Cooke and the two of them fell to the floor. She got up and ran to retrieve her gun. She said she then fired at Cooke in self-defense because she feared for her life. Cooke was struck once in the torso, and according to Franklin, he exclaimed, "Lady, you shot me!" before mounting a last charge at her. She said that she beat him over his head with a broomstick before he finally fell. He was mortally wounded by the gunshot. Franklin noted she fired the gun at least three times. Franklin and the motel's owner, Evelyn Carr, had been speaking on the telephone together at the time of the incident. Thus, Carr claimed to have overheard Cooke's intrusion and the ensuing conflict and gunshots. Carr called the police to request they go to the motel, as she believed a shooting had occurred. A coroner investigated the incident. The woman who had accompanied Cooke to the motel was identified as Elisa Boyer, who had also called the police that night shortly before Carr. Boyer had called police from a telephone booth near the motel, telling them she had just escaped being kidnapped. Boyer told police that she had met Cooke earlier that night and had spent the evening in his company. She claimed that after they left a local nightclub together, she had repeatedly requested that he take her home, but he instead took her against her will to the Hacienda Motel. She claimed that once they had rented one of the motel's $3 rooms, Cooke physically forced her onto the bed and that she was certain he was going to rape her. According to Boyer, when Cooke stepped into the bathroom for a moment, she quickly grabbed her clothes and ran from the room. She claimed that in her haste, she had also scooped up most of Cooke's clothing by mistake. She said that she ran first to the manager's office and knocked on the door seeking help. However, she said the manager took too long in responding, so, fearing Cooke would soon be coming after her, she fled the motel before the manager opened the door. She claimed she put her own clothing back on, hid Cooke's clothing, and went to the telephone booth where she called police. Boyer's story is the only account of what happened between the two that night; however, her story has long been called into question. Inconsistencies between her version of events and details reported by other witnesses, as well as circumstantial evidence (e.g., thousands in cash that Cooke was reportedly carrying were never recovered, and Boyer was soon after arrested for prostitution), invited speculation that Boyer may have gone willingly to the motel with Cooke, then slipped out of the room with Cooke's clothing in order to rob him, rather than to escape an attempted rape.
Tags: Sam  Cooke  death 
Added: 15th December 2012
Views: 2572
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Giants Final Game at Polo Grounds On September 29, 1957, the famous New York Giants baseball team--once the most feared outfit in the National League--played their final game at the Polo Grounds before about 11,000 nostalgic fans. The Giants had represented New York City in the NL since 1883 and had played their home games at four different ballparks known as the Polo Grounds since 1891. Once the city's sports darlings, the Giants had slowly become second bananas to the more glamorous Yankees since the 1920s. One embittered journalist declared, "The real baseball fans in New York supported the Giants. We left the Yankees for the tourists." The Giants lost that last game 9-1 to Pittsburgh. Once the final out was made, fans stormed the field to voice their displeasure with owner Horace Stoneham who had arranged to move the club to San Francisco for the 1958 season. Stoneham wisely did not make an appearance.
Tags: New  York  Giants  MLB  final  game  Polo  Grounds 
Added: 10th May 2013
Views: 2444
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Buddy Holly Plane Crash This is a photo montage of the plane wreck that killed singers Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P. Richardson (a.k.a. The Big Bopper) early on February 3, 1959. Pilot Roger Peterson also was killed. The three musicians had performed at the Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake, IA the night before and were headed to Fargo, ND, the closest airport to their next stop on their tour--Moorhead, MN. They decided to leave ahead of the rest of their group because of their dislike of the cold touring bus and to get their laundry done. The ages of the deceased foursome make this tragedy truly sad: Holly was 22, Richardson was 28, Valens was 17, Peterson was 21. Investigators attributed the crash to pilot error (specifically inexperience with the Bonanza aircraft's altitude gauge) combined with bad winter weather. The crash was neither seen nor heard by anyone on the ground. Investigators calculated it occurred about four minutes after takeoff from Mason City's small airport. The charter plane's owner became concerned when Peterson did not report his flight plan after takeoff which he said he would do. The wreckage of the plane was found in a farmer's corn field about nine hours after the crash. All three singers had been thrown from the plane while Peterson's body was trapped in the twisted metal. In a strange and morbid twist, nearly half a century later in 2007 Richardson's body was exhumed to satisfy the curiosity of his son (who hadn't been born at the time of the crash). He had heard wild rumors that his father may have actually survived the crash and had been shot to death! The well preserved corpse of Richardson--with its perfectly cropped flat-top hairstyle--showed that death was instaneous due to countless fractures consistent with an airplane crash victim. Richardson's son spent several minutes "visiting" his father whom he had never known.
Tags: Buddy  Holly  plane  crash  Ritchie  Valens  Big  Bopper 
Added: 27th August 2013
Views: 4228
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
David Clyde - Pitching Bust David Clyde was perhaps the biggest disappointment in baseball history--which is saying quite a bit! The left-handed pitcher played five MLB seasons with the Texas Rangers (19731975) and Cleveland Indians (19781979). He is noted for his once promising baseball career which ended at age 26 because of arm and shoulder injuries. Hyped as the next Sandy Koufax, Clyde had a stellar amateur career at Westchester High School in Houston, TX where he compiled a minuscule 0.18 ERA in 148 innings. He was drafted by the Texas Rangers with the first overall pick in the 1973 MLB draft. As a way to boost poor attendance in Texas, Clyde was to pitch his first two professional games with the Rangers before moving down to the minor leagues for experience. He made his major league debut at age 18 on June 27, 1973 versus the Minnesota Twins--just 20 days after pitching his last high school game. Before a sellout crowd, Clyde walked the first two Twins he faced and then struck out the next three. He pitched five innings, allowed one hit, and got credit for the Rangers' 4-3 win. The strong attendance caused Rangers' owner Bob Short to reconsider his plans for Clyde. He decided to keep Clyde on the Rangers' roster as a much-needed gate attraction. In 1973 Clyde compiled a poor 5.01 earned run average in 18 starts. Worse, Clyde received very little mentorship. He fell into a clique of Ranger players who were known for their undisciplined behavior away from the diamond. Journalists rightly criticized the Rangers for promoting Clyde too soon. After an uneventful 1974 campaign, he developed shoulder trouble and was sent down to the minor leagues in 1975, where Clyde pitched three seasons. He was traded to the Cleveland Indians in 1978, and played two seasons before being demoted. Clyde attempted to make a comeback with the Houston Astros in 1981 but was unsuccessful. He fell a few innings short of qualifying for a MLB pension.
Tags: David  Clyde  MLB  pitcher 
Added: 16th September 2013
Views: 1261
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Grant Memorial Resurfaces Eddie Grant was a Harvard-educated ballplayer who played for four MLB teams between 1906 and 1915. After his baseball career ended, Grant enlisted in the army during the First World War at age 34. He rose to the rank of captain. On October 5, 1918, a few weeks before the war ended, Grant was killed by enemy shell fire in the Argonne Forest. On Memorial Day 1921, the New York Giants, Grant's final MLB team, unveiled an enormous brass plaque that was handsomely mounted on a five-foot granite marker that sat in the deepest part of the Polo Grounds underneath the home team's clubhouse. From the memorial's dedication until the Giants abandoned New York and the Polo Grounds in 1957, a solemn wreath-laying ceremony was held at the Grant monument every year, usually between games of a Memorial Day doubleheader. At the conclusion of the final game played at the Polo Grounds on September 29, 1957, souvenir hunters mobbed the field. The New York Times reported that three teenagers were seen prying the bronze plaque off the monument. Rumors that the police ultimately recovered the plaque were never verified, and its whereabouts remained a mystery for nearly 42 years. In late July 1999, the Eddie Grant Memorial plaque was discovered in the attic of a home in Ho-Ho-Kus Township, NJ. It had been formerly owned by Lena and Gaetano Bucca. The new home owners, Brian and Deborah Lamb, came across the plaque carefully wrapped in a blanket and hidden under a trap door in the attic. Brian Lamb contacted Baseball Reliquary Board member, Wendy Brougalman, a former business associate, with news of the discovery. How did the 100-pound plaque end up in a New Jersey attic? The Lambs purchased the home from the Bucca family after the death of Lena Bucca in 1998. Gaetano Bucca, a former New York City police officer, died in 1974. Gaetano, who retired from the force in January 1958 and subsequently moved with his family to New Jersey, served in the city's 32nd precinct, an area of jurisdiction encompassing the Polo Grounds. It is assumed that that Officer Bucca and a few allies had arranged to take the plaque with the intention of delivering it to the Eddie Grant American Legion Post 1225 in the Bronx. The plaque never made it there. Benjamin Bucca, Gaetano's only surviving son and a respected probate attorney, had no knowledge at all of the 100-pound plaque situated just above his head in his former bedroom. "You know, I never felt comfortable in that bedroom," he said. "Now I know why! That thing could have fallen on my head in the middle of the night and flattened me. My Pop was always a bit of a mystery, but this . . . This is . . . What the hell was he thinking about?'"
Tags: Baseball  Eddie  Grant  Memorial  recovered 
Added: 8th October 2014
Views: 2728
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Herb Washington Pickoff - 1974 WS In 1974 Oakland Athletics' owner Charlie Finley signed 22-year-old Herb Washington to an MBL contract. Washington's baseball experience was minimal, but he did hold the indoor world record in the 50-yard dash. Throughout the 1974 season, Washington never once batted or played a defensive position. His sole task was to pinch-run. He stole 29 bases in 45 attempts--which is not really a good success rate for a fast MLB baserunner. In Game #2 of the 1974 World Series, Washington was brought in to pinch-run for Joe Rudi in the top of the ninth inning with one out and the A's trailing the L.A. Dodgers 3-2. To the delight of baseball traditionalists who viewed Washington as an unqualified interloper, Mike Marshall decisively picked off Washington in front of a huge NBC television audience. Curt Gowdy and Vin Scully call the play. Washington's out effectively squelched an A's rally. (They had scored twice in the top of the ninth to make the game close.) The Dodgers won the game 3-2. Washington was cut by the A's in May 1975 and never played baseball again.
Tags: Herb  Washington  MLB  runner  pickoff 
Added: 30th April 2015
Views: 1593
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bedroom of WWI Soldier Unchanged Since 1918 In October 2014, a French publication reported on a remarkable tribute to one of France's fallen soldiers from the First World War. A home in Belabre, a small central French village, contains a young man's bedroom that has remained unchanged since its occupant died in the final year of the Great War. Dragoon officer Hubert Rochereau was killed in Belgium on April 26, 1918. His grieving parents, as a tribute to their late son, left his room exactly as it was the last time he set foot in it. Over the years the house has changed ownership numerous times, but each new owner has kept the promise not to alter the bedroom's appearance that accompanied the original sales agreement made by the Rocherau family--although it is completely unenforceable by law. The room contains several articles of clothing, photographs, books, and other personal effects. The mayor of Belabre hopes the recent publicity surrounding the bedroom will eventually lead to the house being converted into a museum.
Tags: bedroom  WWI  soldier  France 
Added: 14th June 2015
Views: 1315
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Lawn Jockeys Signified An Underground Railroad Home A lot of people don't know the real meaning behind these statues, so they vandalize them, bitch about them being racist, etc. When the image of a black 'footman' with a lantern signified the home was a stop on the Underground Railroad. These are largely a northern thing, and weren't commonly found in the South until after WWII when northerners moved there and brought this custom with them. The clothing of the statue was also coded. A striped jockey's shirt meant that this was a place to swap horses, while a footman in a tailed coat meant overnight lodgings/food, and a blue sailor's waistcoat meant the homeowner could take you to a port and get you on a ship to Canada. I always laugh when I hear black folks talk about how racist these are, because honestly, the cats who had them were likely the LEAST racist. Later, these came back into popularity after WWII, and they were again coded to show the white homeowners supported early civil rights efforts, weren't Klan, etc.
Tags: Lawn  Jockeys  Signified  An  Underground  Railroad  Home  black  African  American  slavery    Civil  Rights  KKK  Klan  civil  rights 
Added: 28th January 2016
Views: 3038
Rating:
Posted By: Cathy

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