Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
George Best 1971 Hat-Trick The average American sports fan has probably never heard of George Best, but in the early 1970s, he was probably the best soccer player in the world. A resident of Northern Ireland, Best caught the attention of a scout for Manchester United at age 15 who reported that he had found a 'genius.' Best had incredible balance and could strike beautiful, creative, and powerful shots with both feet. In this clip from September 18, 1971 Best scores three goals for Manchester United versus West Ham United. (The third one is especially spectacular!) Unfortunately Best fell into a hedonistic lifestyle. He once joked that he had spent most of his fortune on booze, women and fast cars--and had squandered the rest! Best became an alcoholic and died way too young at age 59 in 2005.
Tags: George  Best  soccer  Manchester  United 
Added: 15th November 2015
Views: 999
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Lawn Jockeys Signified An Underground Railroad Home A lot of people don't know the real meaning behind these statues, so they vandalize them, bitch about them being racist, etc. When the image of a black 'footman' with a lantern signified the home was a stop on the Underground Railroad. These are largely a northern thing, and weren't commonly found in the South until after WWII when northerners moved there and brought this custom with them. The clothing of the statue was also coded. A striped jockey's shirt meant that this was a place to swap horses, while a footman in a tailed coat meant overnight lodgings/food, and a blue sailor's waistcoat meant the homeowner could take you to a port and get you on a ship to Canada. I always laugh when I hear black folks talk about how racist these are, because honestly, the cats who had them were likely the LEAST racist. Later, these came back into popularity after WWII, and they were again coded to show the white homeowners supported early civil rights efforts, weren't Klan, etc.
Tags: Lawn  Jockeys  Signified  An  Underground  Railroad  Home  black  African  American  slavery    Civil  Rights  KKK  Klan  civil  rights 
Added: 28th January 2016
Views: 2995
Rating:
Posted By: Cathy

Pages: 1 2 [3] of 3 | Random