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Trivial Pursuit Invented 1982 The idea for Trivial Pursuit was born when Chris Haney and Scott Abbott, two Canadian Press employees, got together for a game of Scrabble in the late 1970s. Their banter turned to ideas for their own game. By the end of the evening, they had come up with the formula that would eventually turn them into millionaires. In order to finance the production of Trivial Pursuit, the two intially sold shares of their creation at $1,000 apiece. Few of their CP colleagues took advantage of the investment chance and thus missed out on becoming millionaires themselves. The quiz-based game hit the market in 1982. By 1984 Trivial Pursuit was a cultural phenomenon. Numerous subsequent editions, both general and specialized, have been marketed since then. Hasbro bought the rights to the game in 2008. Co-creator Haney died in June 2009 at the age of 59.
Tags: Trivial  Pursuit  game 
Added: 29th July 2010
Views: 4582
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Posted By: Lava1964
Time travel to 1905 Today we travel back in time to the year 1905 in San Francisco for a trip on board a cable car on Market Street. Kina spooky.
Tags: Time  travel    1905 
Added: 1st November 2010
Views: 2943
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Posted By: Wolfen
Rodney Allen Rippy Rodney Allen Rippy was well known for a few years for his appearances in television commercials, most famously for his work in ads for Jack-In-The-Box restaurants. His fame got him a few small TV roles. (He played himself as the absentee landlord in an episode of The Odd Couple.) By 1975 he had pretty much faded out of show business and into anonymity. As a young man, Rippy earned a university marketing degree. The largely forgotten 42-year-old Rippy made news in September 2010 when he was seriously injured in a motorbike accident.
Tags: Rodney  Allen  Rippy  commercials 
Added: 7th January 2011
Views: 1755
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Posted By: Lava1964
Oorang Indians The Oorang Indians were a travelling team in the National Football League from LaRue, Ohio (near Marion). The team was named after the Oorang dog kennels. It was basically a novelty team put together by the kennels' owner, Walter Lingo, for marketing purposes. All the players were Native Americans, with Jim Thorpe as its star. The Indians played the 1922 and 1923 NFL seasons. Of the 20 games they played over those two seasons, only one was played at 'home' in nearby Marion, OH. Only four games were won by the team. With a population well under 1,000 people, LaRue is easily the smallest town ever to have been the home of an NFL franchise. The Indians were the first NFL team to have a halftime show. (It featured the kennels' dogs.) The team's owner was not too concerned about fielding a competitive squad--and it showed. Discipline was lax on road trips and the players routinely engaged in heavy drinking binges at speakeasies. In one famous incident in St. Louis, the Indians commandeered a trolley car to get them back to their hotel. Since the trolley was headed in the wrong direction, the players simply lifted it, and turned it around on the tracks.
Tags: football  Oorang  Indians  NFL 
Added: 22nd January 2011
Views: 1409
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Posted By: Lava1964
Civil War News Trading Cards Civil War News was a set of 88 collectible trading cards issued in the early 1960s by Topps. The set featured the colorful artwork of Norman Saunders, as well as three other artists. The card set was characterized by vivid colors, graphic depictions of violence, death, and blood (card #21 'Painful Death' being a prime example) and exaggerations of warfare. On the reverse, each card contained a brief history of a campaign, battle, or person. The information was presented in newspaper-article fashion complete with a headline. The complete set of cards, including a checklist, was first printed for the American market in 1962 to coincide with the centennial of the Civil War. A similar series with the same artwork was later issued in Canada. A&BC produced the sets in England. The cards came five to a wax pack with a stick of bubble gum. Also included in each package was a facsimile of Confederate paper currency. The original selling price was a nickel per package. Topps later issued the cards in cellophane-wrapped strips.
Tags: trading  cards  Civil  War  News 
Added: 9th February 2011
Views: 6313
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Posted By: Lava1964
Declaration of Independence Copy Found in Picture Frame Fans of flea markets and garage sales were heartened by this improbable story from the spring of 1991: A collector who spent $4 at a Pennsylvania flea market two years ago for a dismal painting because he liked the frame is the possessor of a rare first printing of the Declaration of Independence. It is valued somewhere between $800,000 and $1 million. David N. Redden, head of the book and manuscript department at Sotheby's in Manhattan, described the document, found behind the painting when the collector took the frame apart, as an 'unspeakably fresh copy' of the declaration. 'The fact that it has been in the backing of the frame preserved it,' he said. Of the 24 copies known to survive, only three are in private hands. Mr. Redden said the unidentified owner bought the painting, 'a dismal dark country scene with a signature he could not make out,' only for its gilded and ornately carved frame. He told Mr. Redden that he discarded the painting, which he disliked. When he realized the frame was crudely made and unsalvageable he got rid of it too. 'But he kept the declaration, which he had found behind the painting,' Mr. Redden said. 'It was folded up, about the size of a business envelope. He thought it might be an early 19th-century printing and worth keeping as a curiosity.' Recently the owner showed it to a friend 'who urged him to look into it further,' said Selby Kiffer, an Americana printing specialist at Sotheby's 'At that point he called us.' Said Kiffer, 'The discovery of any first-printing copy of the declaration, even a fragmentary one or a poor copy, would be exciting, but on this one, the condition is beyond reproach. It was folded up when we first saw it--the way the owner said it was in the painting, less than one-tenth of an inch thick. I had to agree with him it was just as well that he kept it that way. There has been absolutely no restoration, no repair. It was unframed and unbacked.' Only seven of the 24 copies are unbacked, he said, which increases their value. 'The ink was still wet on this copy when it was folded,' Mr. Kiffer said. The very first line -- 'In Congress, July 4, 1776' -- shows up in the bottom margin in reverse, as a faint offsetting or shadow printing, one more proof of the urgency John Dunlap, the printer, and others felt in dispersing this document.
Tags: Declaration  of  Independence  copy  found 
Added: 10th February 2011
Views: 6328
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mattel Marauder Toy Gun Ad From 1967--the days when no one thought anything negative about marketing toy guns...
Tags: Mattel  Marauder  toy  gun  ad 
Added: 15th February 2011
Views: 3876
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Posted By: Lava1964
GI Joe Nurse Doll One of the most spectacular failures in toy history was the G.I. Joe Nurse figure. In 1967 Hasbro expanded its line of successful G.I. Joe toys. One was the G.I. Nurse Action Girl, a doll so rare that certain models in mint condition still in the box can bring up to $6,000 on todayís collectorsí market. 'The G.I. Joe Nurse is so valuable today because it was released for only one year,' says Sharon Korbeck, editorial director of Toy Shop, a biweekly magazine aimed at toy collectors. 'The figure didnít do very well. Boys werenít interested in a female doll, and girls werenít interested in anything related to G.I. Joe.' Sales also suffered because toy store managers didnít know how to position the doll. Some put her with the G.I. Joe action figures, while others stocked her next to Barbie and her friends. Either way, 50 percent of the prospective market was lost. There are actually two G.I. Joe Nurse figures: one has a dark-colored bag. The other has a white bag. An example of the rarer white-bag doll was highlighted on a season-four episode of Pawn Stars.
Tags: GI  Joe  nurse 
Added: 28th May 2011
Views: 16046
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Posted By: Lava1964
Billy West - Chaplin Impersonator Billy West (September 22, 1892 - July 21, 1975) was an actor, producer, and director of the silent film era. He is best known as a terrific Charlie Chaplin impersonator. Born Roy B. Weissburg in Russia, West adopted his professional name some time after emigrating to America. He appeared in many short films, first in Apartment No. 13 in 1912. In 1917 movie theaters couldn't get enough Charlie Chaplin comedies, and an enterprising producer hired West, who had been doing comic pantomimes on the vaudeville stage, to make imitation-Chaplin subjects to meet the demand. West, wearing the identical tramp costume and makeup, copied Chaplin's movements and gestures so accurately that modern audiences often mistake West for the genuine performer. Chaplin himself saw the Billy West company filming on a Hollywood street, and allegedly told West, 'You're a damned good imitator.' Some West comedies were later deceitfully re-released on the home-movie market as 'Charlie Chaplin' pictures. Most of the West comedies of 1917-18 resembled the Chaplin comedies of 1916-17, with Oliver Hardy approximating the villainy of Eric Campbell, and Leatrice Joy in the Edna Purviance ingenue role.
Tags: silent  films  Billy  west  Chaplin  impersonator 
Added: 7th July 2011
Views: 1863
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Posted By: Lava1964
Buckwheat Hoax 1990 ABC News found itself in an embarrassing position in 1990. Acting on a viewer's tip, 20/20, ABC's weekly news magazine, aired a "Where are they now?" segment about former Our Gang member Buckwheat. The story claimed that Buckwheat, whose real name was Bill English, was modestly employed as a grocery bagger at a Tempe, AZ supermarket. Immediately following the broadcast, dozens of Our Gang fans called ABC to tell the network they had been duped by an imposter. The real Buckwheat was named Billie Thomas--and he had died of a heart attack in 1980. Among the whistle-blowers was Our Gang alumnus Spanky McFarland who had worked alongside Thomas from 1934 until 1942. (Buckwheat stayed with the series until its conclusion in 1944.) Shortly after the hoax was exposed, a reporter from A Current Event interviewed McFarland via satellite from his home in Dallas while simultaneously interviewing English via satellite from Tempe. English came across as mumbling, evasive, incoherent, and thoroughly unconvincing. Moreover, English claimed to be the "first Buckwheat"--even though there was only one. The fallout of the debacle was that Lynn Murray, the producer of the 20/20 segment, was fired for doing inadequate research. Thomas's son sued ABC for damages. Hugh Downs issued an on-air apology on the following 20/20 broadcast. ABC News released a half-hearted, semi-apologetic media statement describing the situation as awkward "because English truly believes he is Buckwheat." English went to his grave in November 1994 still maintaining he was Buckwheat.
Tags: Buckwheat  hoax  Our  Gang  ABC  20/20 
Added: 21st August 2011
Views: 3351
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Posted By: Lava1964

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