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Boxing at Yankee Stadium - 1923 When New York's Yankee Stadium opened in 1923, it was the most spectacular sports facility of its age. Besides baseball, other events took place at The House That Ruth Built. Here's a photo of a 1923 boxing match--probably one of the preliminary fights on the undercard of the Jess Willard-Floyd Johnson heavyweight bout that attracted 63,000 spectators. (I can't imagine paying for one of those seats far away in the outfield bleachers. You'd be hard pressed to see anything!)
Tags: boxing  1923  Yankee  Stadium 
Added: 8th January 2015
Views: 1582
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dorothy Arnold - Missing Socialite One of the most intriguing missing persons cases in American history centers around a 24-year-old New York socialite, Dorothy Arnold, who seemingly vanished into thin air one afternoon in New York City in 1910. Arnold was from a wealthy family, the daughter of the 73-year-old head of a prosperous import company and the niece of a Supreme Court justice. Educated at Bryn Mawr, Dorothy was an aspiring writer. On Monday, December 12, 1910, Dorothy left her New York City home at about 11 a.m. telling her mother she would be shopping for an evening gown for an upcoming event. Dorothy left the house with only the clothes on her back and about $30. Arnold went to a candy store and a bookstore where she bought items using the Arnold family credit. When she left the bookstore, Dorothy encountered Gladys King, a friend. King was the last known person to have seen Dorothy. No one who saw Dorothy on December 12 noticed anything odd about her behavior. She apparently never purchased the dress, so she had either lied to her mother or had been interrupted before she could buy it. On the day of her disappearance, Dorothy was fashionably dressed and was a familiar face in New York City. Therefore, it is unlikely that Dorothy could have ventured far without being noticed. That evening, when Dorothy strangely had not returned home for dinner, the Arnold family began making inquiries among her friends. They were unable to turn up any news of their daughter. Fearing some sort of scandal, Dorothy's family did not call the police right away--which was typical of the era. Anyone calling the Arnold home inquiring about Dorothy was told she was in bed with a headache. Dorothy's parents hired a lawyer who privately tried to find Dorothy for six weeks. His investigation got nowhere, so the police were finally contacted in late January of 1911. By that time, Dorothy's trail had gone hopelessly cold. Newspapers played up the story--especially in New York City. It led to several hoaxes, including two phony ransom notes being sent to the Arnold home and a postcard purportedly sent overseas by Dorothy. These were quickly dismissed as inauthentic. After 75 days, the police closed the case under the assumption that Dorothy was dead. However as late as 1935 the New York City police were still receiving tips about alleged sightings of Dorothy. So what happened to Dorothy? She had been unofficially engaged to a 42-year-old man named George (Junior) Griscom--a situation which displeased her family who considered him to be a loafer. There was absolutely no evidence that she and Junior had a falling out or had run away together. In fact, Junior put out several ads imploring Dorothy to contact him, but to no avail. He eventually moved on with his life. Another theory was that Dorothy was upset that her parents had cruelly mocked her for wanting to become a writer and because two of her stories had recently been rejected by magazines. Thus some people speculate Dorothy committed suicide believing that she was a failure. Still no one had evidence that she was anything but happy on the day she disappeared. Yet another theory is that Dorothy died at an illegal abortion clinic and her body was swiftly incinerated in the building's furnace--which was known to happen in 1910. In 1921, John H. Ayers, who headed New York City's Missing Persons Bureau, curiously told an auditorium filled with high school students that Dorothy's fate had always been known to the police and her family but he did not elaborate any further. When journalists pressed him for more details, he quickly claimed he had been misquoted.
Tags: missing  persons  case  Dorothy  Arnold 
Added: 16th January 2015
Views: 2079
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bobby Hull scores in 1963 NHL ASG They may sound unbelievable, but a long time ago NHL players took pride in the the league's annual All-Star Game. They actually played defense and cared about the outcome of the game. Here's a clip of Bobby Hull scoring in the 1963 game. At that time the ASG featured the defending Stanley Cup champions versus a team of all-stars from the other NHL clubs. This game ended in a 3-3 tie between the All-Stars and Toronto Maple Leafs. (Yeah, the Toronto Maple Leafs were once the defending Stanley Cup champions. Imagine that!)
Tags: 1963  NHL  All-Star  Game  Bobby  Hull  goal 
Added: 26th January 2015
Views: 968
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Posted By: Lava1964
Doug Henning World Of Magic and Rockette Holiday Tribute Tags: Doug  Henning  World  Of  Magic  and  Rockette  Holiday  Tribute  1978  78  70s  1970s  NC  Nation  Broadcast  Industry  TV  Magic  Illusions  Illusionist     
Added: 7th February 2015
Views: 718
Rating:
Posted By: BigBoy Bob
Doug Henning Teaches A Magic Trick Doug Henning was born May 3, 1947 and left us at the age of 52 February 7, 2000 dying from liver cancer. During his career he was known as the hippie magician.
Tags: Doug  Henning  teaches  a  magic  trick  Captain  Kangaroo  Mr.  Moose  Mr.  Green  Jeans  magic  illusionist  magician  1970 
Added: 7th February 2015
Views: 1289
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Posted By: BigBoy Bob
Boston Bruins vs NY Rangers Fans - 1979 The NHL in the 1970s could often be wild. This was epitomized as the decade neared its end on Sunday, December 23, 1979. On that date the visiting Boston Bruins angrily invaded the stands at Madison Square Garden to administer frontier-style justice on a few New York Rangers fans who had taken some liberties. (It's hard to see the exact cause of the fracas in this video, but this is what happened: A fan, 30-year-old John Kaptain, reached over the glass and belted Boston's Stan Jonathan across the face with a rolled-up program and drew blood. Kaptain then grabbed Jonathan's stick. After that...mayhem ensued!) Among the most enraged Bruins was the normally peaceable Peter McNab. Feisty Terry O'Reilly, not surprisingly, was the most zealous participant. The enduring image, however, is Mike Milbury ripping a shoe from Kaptain's foot and beating him with it! Milbury eventually threw Kaptain's shoe onto the ice. O'Reilly and Milbury would both later coach the Bruins. Kaptain, who attended the game with his brother James and his father Manny, had to make his way home from Madison Square Garden minus one shoe. Some 300 Ranger fans attacked the Bruins' bus outside the arena. Because of this crazy incident, the NHL mandated the height of the protective glass surrounding all teams' ice surfaces be dramatically increased. John Kaptain died in 1999.
Tags: Boston  Bruins  NHL  fight  New  York  Rangers  fans  brawl 
Added: 11th February 2015
Views: 1753
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Posted By: Lava1964
Postmortem Photography It seems a little bit creepy today--well, actually it seems extremely creepy by modern standards--but it was quite common in the late 19th century to photograph your loved ones in lifelike poses after they had died! Photography was generally very expensive in the 19th century. Often families had no photographs of loved ones while they were alive. Accordingly, as part of a funeral ritual, the recently deceased person would be dressed, posed in a very lifelike position--much like the gentleman in this example--and his/her image was preserved for posterity. Frequently they were posed alongside siblings and parents as part of a family portrait. Because of the slow shutter speed of cameras in those days, dead people were actually the best subjects for photographers as they were guaranteed to stay still. Postmortem photography was surprisingly commonplace in Europe and North America (especially of dead children because childhood mortality rates were very high). It remained quite common until photography became cheaper and families were more likely to have photos of their relatives taken while they were still in the land of the living.
Tags: postmortem  photography 
Added: 9th March 2015
Views: 1142
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Posted By: Lava1964
Threes A Crowd - Failed Spinoff After Three's Company left the airwaves in the spring of 1984, ABC cast John Ritter in his Jack Tripper role once again that autumn in Three's A Crowd. The premise of this spinoff was that Jack was now living with his stewardess girlfriend Vicky Bradford in an apartment above his restaurant (Jack's Bistro). Complicating matters was that Vicky's meddlesome father James owned the building. Like many spinoffs, Three's a Crowd lacked the magic of its parent show. It was cancelled after just one season. Here is the opening montage.
Tags: spinoff  Threes  A  Crowd  John  Ritter 
Added: 24th March 2015
Views: 1102
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Posted By: Lava1964
YMCA Nude Swimming Classes Many stories that your parents and grandparents tell you about the 'good old days' seem far-fetched, but some are actually true. Consider this one: For many years it was mandatory for male swimmers at YMCAs to wear absolutely nothing while in their pools. Based on a recommendation from public health officials, a similar measure was on the books and usually rigorously enforced in American high schools from 1926 to 1962. Why? For many years swimsuits were made of materials that shed fibers and clogged filtration systems. There was also the belief that nude swimming was somehow more healthful and sanitary than swimming in trunks. (Curiously no such rules were ever implemented in female swim classes.) In 1941 Life magazine printed a half-page photo of such a class as an example of 'democracy.' By the early 1960s, however, public sentiment began favoring modesty over nudity and the nude swim classes became a thing of the past.
Tags: nude  swimming  classes  YMCA 
Added: 20th April 2015
Views: 9564
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Posted By: Lava1964
Harold Lloyd Bomb Mishap - 1919 On August 24, 1919, ascending silent movie comedian Harold Lloyd arrived at Pathe Studios to begin a publicity campaign to celebrate his new contract. He was posing for some publicity stills--unaware that such a seemingly benign activity was about to dramatically change his life. In one posed shot Lloyd was supposed to light a prop bomb with a cigarette dangling from his mouth. (The image supposedly played up Lloyd's typical devil-may-care attitude in his films.) Unbeknownst to anyone in the studio, some actual bombs from another film--which had been rejected for being too dangerous--had been placed in a box among some dummy bombs. The photographer innocently handed Lloyd one of the live bombs. When the fuse was lit, Lloyd sensed something was mildly wrong because it produced excessive smoke that would surely ruin any photographs. Just as Lloyd discarded the bomb on a nearby table, it exploded. Miraculously Lloyd was not killed as the blast ripped open a a 16-foot swath in the room. Nevertheless, Lloyd suffered numerous facial injuries and temporarily lost his eyesight. Only when extreme pain set in did Lloyd become aware that his right thumb and forefinger had been severed. He spent six weeks in a hospital recovering. He was overwhelmed by the number of fan letters which he said helped him overcome his depression about the accident. In all his subsequent films Lloyd wore a special prosthetic device concealed within a white glove to make it look like his right hand was absolutely normal. Lloyd did not want to dwell on his injury as he did not want moviegoers to watch his films due to pity. Lloyd continued to engage in very active physical comedy routines despite the handicap. His famous building-climbing scene in Safety Last occurred after the bomb accident--making it all the more incredible. Some years ago I posted Lloyd's 1953 mystery guest appearance on What's My Line. His deformed hand can clearly be seen when he shakes hands with the WML panelists as he departs.
Tags: Harold  Lloyd  bomb  injury  hand 
Added: 20th April 2015
Views: 4043
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Posted By: Lava1964

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