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Hot Dog-Eating Champ Takeru Kobayashi At the prestigious annual Nathan's Hot Dog eating championship in 2001, a skinny, unheralded 23-year-old Japanese contestant named Takeru Kobayashi blew away the field by consuming 50 hot dogs (and buns!) in 12 minutes to double the previous world record. Organizers were so unprepared for Kobayashi's spectacular display of gluttony that they had to resort to hand-written signage to keep track of his astonishing total of devoured dogs. To prove it was no fluke, Kobayashi won the next five Fourth of July Coney Island classics too--with totals of 50, 50.5, 44.5, 53.5 and 53.75 hot dogs respectively. In 2007, despite downing a personal best 63 hot dogs, Kobayashi was upset by American upstart Joey Chestnut. Chestnut also get the better of Kobayashi in 2008 and 2009. In 2010, Kobayashi ran afoul of event organizers when he refused to sign an exclusive contract with Major League Eating, the organization that runs the Coney Island event. Kobayashi was actually arrested as an intruder at the 2010 event when he climbed onstage to congratulate Chestnut on another victory. Kobayashi, nicknamed "The Tsunami" has set several world records in other eating disciplines, such as bratwurst, hamburgers, lobster rolls, and rice balls.
Tags: hot  dog  eating  Takeru  Kobayashi 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 1454
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Posted By: Lava1964
1945 Anti-Japanese Propaganda Film This snippet from a 1945 propaganda film was designed to educate Americans about the dangerous powers of the Emperor of Japan and the ruthless army he commanded.
Tags: Second  World  War  propaganda  film  anti-Japanese 
Added: 28th March 2013
Views: 2811
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Posted By: Lava1964
Time Cover - Japan Surrenders Sometimes words are not necessary to convey a message. This Time Magazine cover from August 20, 1945, heralding the end of the Second World War in the Pacific Theater, gets the point across without any caption whatsoever.
Tags: Time  cover  1945  Second  World  War  Japan 
Added: 25th May 2013
Views: 1847
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Posted By: Lava1964
Remains of George Mallory Found - 1999 Seventy-Five years after British mountaineer George Mallory vanished in June 1924 in his attempt to be the first man to scale Mount Everest, an expedition from National Geographic was organized to try to find his remains--along with those of his climbing colleague Andrew Irvine. The two were last seen alive about 800 meters from the summit. In 1979 a Chinese mountaineer reported to a Japanese climber that he had come across the remains of "an Englishman" during an ascent in 1975. The Chinese climber was killed in an avalanche the following day before he could give precise directions to the corpse. Going on the general location the Chinese climber had provided, the 1999 expedition covered a search area about the size of a dozen football fields. Sure enough, on May 1, 1999, Mallory's mummified corpse, sun bleached to an alabaster white, was discovered face down and fused to the mountain scree by American searcher Conrad Anker. ID tags on the clothing quickly confirmed the body was indeed Mallory's. Found in Mallory's possession was a letter from his brother and an unpaid bill Mallory owed to a London clothing shop. Mallory had several broken bones and a punctured skull, leading to speculation that he had severely injured himself in a sudden, violent fall and likely froze to death in a helpless state in a matter of minutes. Whether Mallory made it to Everest's summit or not is a matter of heated debate. Irvine's body has yet to be found. Warning: The clip is a little bit gruesome.
Tags: mountaineering  George  Mallory  corpse  discovery 
Added: 26th October 2014
Views: 1626
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Posted By: Lava1964
Readers Digest August 1970 Issue Date: August 1970; Vol. 97, No. 580 Articles, subjects and contributors in this issue: COVER: Bicycle Byway by Ralph Avery. From Bach to Books by Jeffrey R. Haskell. The Crow and the Oriole by James Thurber. Boss of the Park -- Umpires -- by Bill Surface. The Plains a Boy a Summer Day by Hal Borland. 41 Ways to Beat the High Cost of Living. Russia's Menacing New Challenge in the Middle East by Joseph Alsop. We Need Our Young Activists by John D. Rockefeller 3rd. Portrait of a Mobster -- Carlos Marcello -- by William Schulz. Sexual Inadequacy -- And What Can Be Done About It by Will Bradbury. How to Talk With Your Teen Ager About Drugs by Herman W. Land. Toward a Livable Environment: I Victory in the Everglades by Jean George. II A Sensible Plan for Future Development by James Nathan Miller. The Car in the River by E. D. Fales Jr. Bold New Directions for U S High Schools by Arlene Silberman. Poverty at the Border by Lester Velie. Try Giving Yourself Away David Dunn. Japan -- All Asia Watches and Wonders by Carl T. Rowan. The Gifts of Gregory Menn by Joseph P. Blank. Better Living With Machinery by Charles McDowell Jr. L Dopa Has Set Me Free by Floyd Miller. Time to Knock Out the Vote Thieves! by Louis B. Nichols. Provocative; Prophetic Margaret Mead by David Dempsey. How to Murder Your Husband by Jean Mayer. Rugged Idaho by Don Wharton. They Go to Prison on Purpose Arthur Gordon. What the Moon Rocks Reveal by Fred Warshofsky. The Lesson of the Lemmings by Ola and Emily d'Aulaire. Bottoms Up! by Jack Goodman and Alan Green. The Duel That Changed Our History by Thomas Fleming. Paper Magic of Origami by and Akira Yoshizawa by Leland Stowe. KGB: The Swallows' Nest "KGB" by John Barron.
Tags: Readers  Digest  August  1970  articles  magazine   
Added: 26th December 2014
Views: 2553
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Posted By: Cathy
The Battle Of Midway Today in history, June 4, 1942 the 4 day Battle of Midway began.
Tags: The  Battle  Of  Midway  United  States  Navy  Battle  War  WWII  World  War  2  Naval  attack  Japan  rising  sun 
Added: 4th June 2015
Views: 1881
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Posted By: Steve
Mickey Rooney as Mr Yunioshi In the 1961 romantic comedy Breakfast at Tiffany's, Audrey Hepburn played flighty New York City escort Holly Golightly. The relatively small role of her Japanese landlord, Mr. Yunioshi, was strangely played by...Mickey Rooney. Director Blake Edwards instructed Rooney to play Yunioshi as a caricature of an Asian. Accordingly Rooney wore false dentures to give him protruding front teeth. He also spoke in a way that the letter L came out as an R sound. ('Miss Go-right-ry' was how he pronounced the main character's name.) Most of the time Mr. Yunioshi yelled rather than spoke. Based on 21st-century political correctness, Rooney's performance clearly falls within the bounds of bad taste, but as Rooney noted shortly before he died, for the first 40 years after Breakfast at Tiffany's was released, nobody complained. In fact, Rooney claimed that Asian fans of the film always thought his portrayal of Mr. Yunioshi was very amusing.
Tags: Mickey  Rooney  Mr  Yunioshi  Breakfast  at  Tiffanys 
Added: 20th June 2015
Views: 1343
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Posted By: Lava1964
Theme From The Bridge on the River Kwai The Bridge on the River Kwai won the Oscar for Best Picture of 1957. It also re-popularized "The Colonel Bogey March"--a British military song dating back to 1914. It is one of those melodies that sticks in your mind forever. In this scene from early in the film, a new batch of British Empire troops whistle the tune as they march into captivity in a brutal Japanese labor camp.
Tags: Bridge  on  the  River  Kwai  theme 
Added: 12th July 2015
Views: 1655
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Posted By: Lava1964
WWII Hawaii Overprint Money After the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, there was a legitimate fear that the Japanese would next launch a full-scale invasion of the Hawaiian Islands and occupy them. Among the consequences if that nightmare scenario actually unfolded was that all the US paper money in Hawaii would be seized from banks, businesses and private citizens and be used to finance Imperial Japan's war machine. Accordingly, a remarkable decision was made: During the first half of 1942, Hawaii's residents were ordered take their paper money to special collection areas and exchange it for new bills. Each bill had a special overprint of the word HAWAII on its reverse side. If Hawaii ever did fall to the Japanese, the US government would immediately declare the Hawaii overprint bills to be worthless. The old bills that were exchanged--about $200 million of them--were burned under the supervision of the American military. Such a calamity never occurred, of course. The overprint notes are still acceptable as legitimate US money today, although they rarely are found in general circulation.
Tags: Hawaii  WWII  money  overprint  bills 
Added: 22nd May 2017
Views: 1281
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Posted By: Lava1964

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