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Pedal Powered Washing Machine Bart Orlando demonstrates that one person has the power to wash clothes in a pedal powered Wringer washing machine. The wringer eliminates the spin dry function, standard on modern washing machines. One person can do 1/3 of a normal load of laundry in about 30 minutes. An exercise bike is substituted for the orignal 2hp 110v electric motor. A fan-belt is rapped around the flywheel of the exercise bike and a pulley which drives the original transmission of the Wringer Washer. . . humm . .
Tags: Bart  Orlando    inventions    pedal-powered  washing  machine 
Added: 22nd December 2007
Views: 1827
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Posted By: Teresa
Our Miss Brooks After searching everywhere for even one clip of Our Miss Brooks, I finally found one! I don't know how many will remember this show, but I'm sure everyone remembers Richard Crenna, who played Walter Denton. This show became a real classic, and its comedy is timeless. This episode first aired on November 7, 1952. Walter invents a new type of clear paint that is great for fixing cracks and scratches in walls. Mr. Conklin orders Miss Brooks to fix up his office after Mr. Stone, the head of the board, notices how beat up the office is. Mr. Boynton decides to help Connie and Walter paint Mr. Conklin's office with Walter's new invention.
Tags: our  miss  brooks  eve  arden  richard  crenna  gale  gordon  50 
Added: 26th January 2008
Views: 2329
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Posted By: Babs64
Philo T. Farnsworth Inventor of TV Tags: philo      farnsworth      television      video      technology      game      show      science      history      invention      breakthrough      quantum      leap      electronic     
Added: 2nd March 2008
Views: 1378
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Posted By: pfc
Philo Farnsworth on Ive Got A Secret Tags: philo      farnsworth      television      video      technology      game      show      science      history      invention      breakthrough      quantum      leap      electronic     
Added: 2nd March 2008
Views: 1195
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Posted By: pfc
Halifax Explosion 1917 On December 6, 1917 two ships collided in the harbour at Halifax, Nova Scotia and caught fire. One was laden with tons of explosives and munitions for the First World War. Ninety minutes later the munitions ship exploded, killing 1,900 people. It was history's largest man-made explosion until the invention of atomic bombs. (This amateur video was created as a school project. Please excuse the typos contained in the video's text.)
Tags: Halifax  explosion 
Added: 7th June 2008
Views: 1567
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Posted By: Lava1964
Football Point Spreads Invented During the football season, millions of dollars are bet legally and illegally every weekend on college and pro games. This is largely due to the system of point spreads. The invention of this new form of wagering occurred in the 1930s and is generally credited to Charlie McNeil, a Chicago stockbroker. Before the advent of point spreads, few people bet on football. Because most games had predictable outcomes and wagers could only be placed on outright wins, few gamblers bothered. (Why bet on a 15-1 longshot that wasn't likely to win?) Bookies were also reluctant to accept bets on overwhelming favorites or risk huge losses on upsets. McNeil's point spread system made football betting much more attractive by statistically levelling the playing field. Now favorites had to win by certain amounts for bettors to win. It also guaranteed a more equitable distribution of bets on each team, pleasing bookies and legal gaming establishments who make their profits largely on commissions.
Tags: football  point  spreads  gambling 
Added: 27th October 2009
Views: 1281
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Posted By: Lava1964
Invention of Standard Time It seems hard to believe, but not until the 1880s did North America have recognized standard time zones. Instead, each individual city generally set its own time according to the position of the sun. This system didn't cause much trouble until the railroad age blossomed--then chaos ensued. Because the clocks in cities even a few miles apart routinely varied, running a railroad became a nightmare. (For example, in Canada, Montreal was 22 minutes ahead of Toronto because it is 500 kilometres further to the northeast.) In 1879, a Scottish-born Canadian railway man, Sandford Fleming (pictured here), actively proposed time zones to simplify North American railroad schedules. These were adopted in 1883. Almost immediately, the various cities and states followed the railroaders' lead. Soon the rest of world followed too. There are now 24 basic time zones in the world, each encompassing approximately 15 degrees longitude.
Tags: standard  time  geography  Sandford  Fleming 
Added: 8th March 2010
Views: 1525
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Posted By: Lava1964
Adding Machine 1905 Adding machines have been around for more than a century, but the old-fashioned 'crank' models had pretty much disappeared from offices by the late 1980s. William S. Burroughs (1855-1898) invented an adding and listing machine with a full keyboard in the early 1880s. He submitted a patent application in 1885, co-founded the American Arithmometer Co. in 1886 to produce the machine, and received a patent for his invention in 1888. After its Bankers' and Merchants' Registering Accountant machine failed in trials in 1890, the American Arithmometer Co. marketed its improved Burroughs Registering Accountant in 1892 for $475. In 1905, the company was renamed the Burroughs Adding Machine Co. In 1894, an article in a bankers' publication-- clearly referring to the Burroughs Registering Accountant--reported that 'An ingenious adding machine, recently introduced in Providence banks, is said to be infallible in results, and to do the work of two or three active clerks. Inclosed in a frame with heavy plate-glass panels, through which the working of the mechanism can be seen, the machine occupies a space of 11 by 15 inches and is nine inches high. On an inclined keyboard are 81 keys, arranged in nine rows of nine keys each. The printing is done through an inked ribbon.' Shown here is a Burroughs model from 1905. A seat is provided for the user! How quaint!
Tags: adding  machine 
Added: 22nd June 2010
Views: 2239
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Posted By: Lava1964
1922 Saturday Evening Post Cover This Saturday Evening Post cover from 1922 shows grandma and grandpa enjoying that wonderful newfangled invention--radio. The artist? Norman Rockwell, of course.
Tags: Saturday  Evening  Post  cover  Norman  Rockwell 
Added: 1st August 2010
Views: 1779
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Posted By: Lava1964
Accurate Ads Predicting The Future AT&T had the inside edge to the technology we take for granted today. These ads ran from 1993-1994, yes, Tom Selleck's voice!
Tags: AT&T  Technology  predicting  future  inventions  Tome  Selleck 
Added: 1st February 2011
Views: 1870
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Posted By: pfc

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