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Brothers In Arms IMO. one of the most instantly recognisable guitar players on the planet. Mark Knopfler and Dire Straits have given us some the most memorable tunes and songs.
Tags: Dire  Straits  Brothers  In  Arms 
Added: 16th March 2008
Views: 1312
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Posted By: donmac101
Dan Hartman  I can dream about you Daniel Earl "Dan" Hartman (December 8, 1950 - March 22, 1994) was an American singer, songwriter and record producer best known for the 1984 song "I Can Dream About You". In 1978 Hartman reached number-one on the Dance Charts with the single, "Instant Replay" (#29 on the Billboard Hot 100).
Tags: I  can  dream,  dan  hartman 
Added: 18th March 2008
Views: 1337
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Posted By: rickfmdj
Hockey Night in Canada titles from a 1981 Stanley Cup match comes the titles n' classic theme tune for CBC's HOCKEY NIGHT IN CANADA. Generations of hockey fans were instantly invigorated by the opening notes of the theme, up until CBC opted not to pay the requested royalties and go for an entirely new piece of music. Rival network CTV subsequently snapped up the rights to the original theme.
Tags: hockey  night  in  Canada  theme  music  song  bumper  graphics  sports  1980s  1981  1970s 
Added: 1st July 2009
Views: 1840
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Posted By: robatsea
Scott MacKenzie  San Francisco San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)" is a song, written by John Phillips of The Mamas & the Papas, and sung by Scott McKenzie. It was released in June 1967 (the Summer of Love), and became a cultural icon of the 1960s counterculture of Haight-Ashbury, San Francisco. McKenzie's song, penned by Phillips to promote the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, became an instant hit, and became the anthem of the hippie era. The song's lyrics tell the listeners, "If you're going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair". Due to the difference between the lyrics and the actual title, the title is often quoted as "San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Some Flowers in Your Hair)". "San Francisco" reached number four on the Billboard Hot 100 in the U.S., and was number one in the UK and most of Europe. The single is purported to have sold over 5 million copies worldwide. The song is credited with bringing thousands of young people to San Francisco, California during the late 1960s. Also in the hit movie Forrest Gump.
Tags: Scott  MacKenzie    San  Francisco 
Added: 18th July 2008
Views: 2337
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Posted By: rickfmdj
Another Sexist Folgers Ad You've got to love these old Folger's Coffee commercials from the early 1960s. They're all pretty much the same: Doting wife's biggest concern in life is making the perfect cup of coffee for hubby. She fails miserably until she switches to instant Folger's. Once this crisis is solved, presumably hubby and wife can produce their statistical average of 2.2 children and live the American Dream.
Tags: Folgers  coffee  sexist  ad 
Added: 4th August 2008
Views: 1910
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Posted By: Lava1964
1972 Munich Olympic Massacre This edition of Time Magazine chronicled the worst incident in the history of the Olympic Games. On September 5, 1972 a radical terrorist group, Black September, got through ridiculously lax security at the athletes' village in Munich, West Germany simply by wearing track suits and acting like they belonged there. At 4:30 a.m. they took a group of 11 Israeli athletes, coaches, and officials hostage. Two Israelis were killed almost instantly for resisting. The other nine died at the airport where special German anti-terror police got into a gun battle with the terrorists. (One German policeman was killed too.) Up to that time, the 1972 Summer Olympics had been a splendid, friendly affair. The 'openness' of the Games and limited security was deliberate. The West German organizers wanted to erase the memories of the 'Nazified' 1936 Berlin Olympics. Since that awful day, Olympic Games security has become much more efficient and hugely expensive.
Tags: Olympic  massacre  Israelis  Munich 
Added: 15th August 2008
Views: 2747
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Posted By: Lava1964
Instant Recall Pilot Sept 1990 From Sept. 12, 1990, here are the first ten minutes of the first "Instant Recall," a slick newsmagazine that looked back at events of previous years. I was totally captivated by this show and have about 36 hours of it on videotape!!
Tags: instant  recall  ray  glasser  1990 
Added: 14th July 2009
Views: 1341
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Posted By: videoholic
Ernie Kovacs Fatal Car Crash Early on the morning of January 13, 1962, comedian Ernie Kovacs was killed in a single-vehicle accident in Beverly Hills. He was 10 days away from his 43rd birthday. Kovacs had attended a party at the home of Milton Berle to celebrate the Christening of Berle's son. Kovacs and wife Edie Adams arrived in separate cars. Adams left the party not long before her husband. During a sudden rainstorm, Kovacs lost control of his vehicle on a curve. It slammed into a utility pole, partially ejecting Kovacs from the car. He died instantly from massive head and chest injuries. Police theorized Kovacs may have lost control of the car while groping for one of his trademark cigars. Kovacs was driving a Corvair, a vehicle later exposed by Ralph Nader for being unsafe in turns. Many newspapers featured a photo of Kovacs' dead body at the accident scene. Largely forgotten today, Kovacs was a brilliant comedian whose off-the-wall humor was years ahead of his time. David Letterman cites Kovacs as a huge influence. At the time of his death Kovacs was deeply in debt with the IRS. (Kovacs believed the taxation system was unfair so he steadfastly refused to pay income tax.) His widow worked for years to clear his debt. A daughter of Kovacs and Adams also died in a car crash in 1982.
Tags: Ernie  Kovacs  death  car  accident 
Added: 30th October 2009
Views: 18732
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Posted By: Lava1964
United States Football League Sports history has shown that it is very difficult for nascent pro sports leagues to challenge old, established ones. Nevertheless, there are entrepreneurs always willing to try. From 1983 through 1985 the United States Football League existed as a spring/summer league. The USFL was the brainchild of David Dixon, a New Orleans antique dealer. In 1980, Dixon commissioned a study by Frank Magid Associates that found promising results for a spring and summer football league. He'd also formed a blueprint for the prospective league's operations, which included early television exposure, heavy promotion in home markets, and owners willing to absorb years of losses—-which he felt would be inevitable until the league found its feet. The USFL secured television contracts from both ABC and ESPN. The league also was able to sign several collegiate stars--most notably Herschel Walker who was still an underclassman. Mostly, however, the public responded with yawns. Television ratings and overall attendance were below expectations. Teams often spent far more than the proposed $1.8 million salary cap to land big-name players. In three seasons, 23 different teams played under the USFL banner. The Breakers were a typical USFL franchise, operating in three different cities (Boston, New Orleans, and Portland) over the three years. Teams typically wallowed in debt. The San Antonio Gunslingers were in such dire straits that some players, whose pay checks had bounced, were exchanging their complimentary game tickets for food and were boarding at the homes of sympathetic fans. The USFL was dealt its death blow in a courtroom in 1986 when it won an antitrust lawsuit versus the National Football League--but the jury awarded the USFL only $3 in damages. Still, some USFL innovations were evenutally adopted by the NFL. These included the two-point conversion, the use of instant replay to assist officials, and a salary cap.
Tags: USFL  football 
Added: 21st November 2009
Views: 1558
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Posted By: Lava1964
Penny Postcards In 1873 American postmaster John Creswell introduced the first pre-stamped penny postcards. These first postcards depicted the Interstate Industrial Exposition that took place in Chicago that year. The postcards were made because people were looking for an easier way to send quick notes. They were an instant hit with the public. The first postcard to be printed as a souvenir in the United States was created in 1893 to advertise the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The Post Office was the only establishment allowed to print postcards, and it held its monopoly until May 19, 1898, when Congress passed the Private Mailing Card Act which allowed private publishers and printers to produce postcards. Initially, the United States government prohibited private companies from calling their cards 'postcards,' so they were instead known as 'souvenir cards.' To adhere to the law, these cards had to be labeled 'Private Mailing Cards.' This prohibition was finally rescinded in December 24, 1901 when private companies could legally use the word 'postcard' as they pleased. The golden age of American postcards lasted until 1915. In 1908 alone, more than 677 million postcards were mailed in the United States. Below is a sample from 1905.
Tags: penny  postcards 
Added: 1st November 2010
Views: 1861
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Posted By: Lava1964

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