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Braves Field Here's a view of the spacious outfield of Braves Field in Boston. Braves Field was the home ballpark of the National League's Boston Braves from 1915 through 1952. After the Braves relocated to Milwaukee folowing the 1952 season, the historic ballpark was bought by Boston University.
Tags: Braves  Field  Boston 
Added: 13th January 2009
Views: 1211
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Posted By: Lava1964
Name This Important Ballplayer Can you identify this St. Louis Cardinal? His historic importance goes beyond his exploits on the diamond. (Hint: He's one of the reasons your $2 bleacher seat now costs $10 and why some players change teams as often as they change their underwear.)
Tags: baseball   
Added: 17th January 2009
Views: 1062
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Posted By: Lava1964
To Tell the Truth With Rosa Parks This is a 1980 version of To Tell the Truth, historically memorable!
Tags:   tell    truth    rosa    parks    nipsey  russell    kitty    carlisle    1980   
Added: 11th February 2009
Views: 1635
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Posted By: mia_bambina
The Oldest LOL CAT This antique postcard, published in 1905 is of historical importance as it appears to be the oldest LOLcat in existence. Perhaps soon, archeologists will discover an even older LOLcat on the walls of an Egyptian tomb... perhaps a cat with the caption, "I see what you did there!"
Tags: The  Oldest  LOL  CAT  antique  postcard  1905  LOLcat   
Added: 11th July 2009
Views: 7530
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Posted By: Cliffy
Kilroy Was Here During the Second World War, the odd phrase "Kilroy Was Here" began appearing on American military ships. Alongside the phrase was often a cartoon figure of a man with a huge nose peering over a wall. It was not until the war ended that the origin of the quirky character was known. James Kilroy was an inspector at a shipbuilding company in Halifax, MA. His job was to count the rivets used in each piece of work and make a checkmark with a wax pencil near the finished rivets. The riveters were paid for each rivet, so often unscrupulous ones would erase Kilroy's checkmarks in the hope that their work would be counted twice. To thwart this type of underhandedness, Kilroy began using the cartoon figure with the three-word phrase instead of a checkmark. No riveter ever tried to remove the artwork. Kilroy was supposed to remove it before the ships left the shipyard, but often he did not get the chance to do so. Thus, ships bearing the strange phrase and artwork headed into service. "Kilroy Was Here" became a catchphrase that was universally adopted throughout every American theater of war. It became fashionable to write it in strange places as an indication that the US military was omnipresent. It was often left behind by espionage agents and advance parties prior to mass invasions. According to one story, it was written inside the latrine used by Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill during the historic Yalta Conference in 1945. The phrase has endured for more than 70 years. It was written on the wall of the compound where Osama Bin Laden was hiding out.
Tags: Kilroy  Was  Here  WWII 
Added: 7th December 2014
Views: 2349
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Posted By: Lava1964
First Crossword Puzzle 1913 Arthur Wynne started a sensation on December 21, 1913. His creation, the first-ever crossword puzzle, appeared as a 'mental exercise' in the Fun section of the New York World. The numbering system is a little different than what you'd see in today's puzzles. Clues listed both starting and ending numbers. Within a decade, crossword puzzles were a newspaper staple throughout most of the English-speaking world. I'll post the clues for this historic puzzle if anyone requests them.
Tags: crossword  puzzle 
Added: 5th October 2009
Views: 3824
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Posted By: Lava1964
1964 Surgeon General Report on Smoking One of the most impactful press conferences ever held occurred on Saturday, January 11, 1964. On that date Luther L. Terry, the Surgeon General of the United States, announced conclusive medical proof that smoking was undeniably a public health hazard. The report was based on more than 7,000 scientific studies. One set of statistics quoted in Terry's report stated that smokers were 10 times more likely to be afflicted with lung cancer than non-smokers. (Heavy smokers were 20 times more likely.) The report also linked heart disease and emphysema to smoking. The historic press conference was deliberately held on a Saturday to minimize the effect on the stock market and to get maximum exposure in the major Sunday newspapers.
Tags: smoking  cancer  surgeon  general  report 
Added: 10th October 2009
Views: 1907
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Posted By: Lava1964
Georgia Tech Beats Cumberland 222-0 The worst rout in the history of American college football was administered by mighty Georgia Tech against tiny Cumberland College on October 7, 1916. The final score was 222-0. There were some extenuating circumstances. Cumberland had signed a contract a year in advance to play Georgia Tech in Atlanta in 1916, but discontinued its football program after the 1915 season. However, the contract with Tech included a hefty $3,000 forfeit penalty if Cumberland failed to put a team on the field against Tech. Instead of paying the fine, Cumberland threw together a team on short notice. The team never held a single practise. One player, a law student, recalled years later, 'We put a lot of faith in the clause about placing a team on the field. There was nothing in the contract requiring us to play well.' Tech coach John Heisman showed no mercy. His squad scored nine touchdowns in both the first and second quarters to lead 126-0 at halftime. Tech agreed to shorten the third and fourth quarters and only scored 14 more touchdowns. In all, Tech scored 32 touchdowns (and 30 conversions). Tech also amassed 1,650 yards rushing on just 40 attempts. Cumberland's rushing total was -96 yards. They did complete two passes, though. Tech did not attempt a pass all game. Most interesting stat: There were no first downs by either team. All of Tech's big plays went for touchdowns. Cumberland's biggest play was a 10-yard pass completion on a fourth-and-28 situation. Despite their historic defeat, the Cumberland players returned to their Lebanon, TN campus as heroes for saving their small school $3,000.
Tags: college  football  Georgia  Tech  Cumberland 
Added: 28th October 2009
Views: 4490
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fort Montgomery - Civil War Fort Ruins Fort Montgomery is on the New York side of Lake Champlain at Rouses Point, NY. The multi-cannoned fort was built to prevent a foreign power from sailing down the Northern Corridor waterway from Montreal to New York City. In the 1930's part of it was demolished for use as fill for a new bridge. Much of what remains is intact and is a fun, sometimes spooky, historic site to visit. Tours are now given. It will be featured on the History Channel in the near future. Its role in defining and protecting our homeland borders will be emphasized.
Tags: Fort  Rouses  Point  Civil  War  Tour    Champlain 
Added: 31st October 2009
Views: 1500
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Posted By: Watersnake
Foster Hewitt Canada's first pioneer sports broadcaster was diminutive Foster Hewitt. His first hockey broadcast was an amateur game between Toronto and Kitchener in 1923--which he did from the penalty box. He became the voice of the Toronto Maple Leafs on Hockey Night In Canada when its radio broadcasts began in 1931. For the next 40 years Hewitt's familiar voice was the most famous in Canada. He regularly began his broadcasts with the phrase, 'Hello, Canada...and hockey fans in the United States and Newfoundland.' Hewitt smoothly made the transition to television in 1952--and his TV broadcasts were still simulcast on radio until 1963. That year his son Bill took over the TV broadcasts; Foster continued hockey broadcasts on the radio until 1970. Hewitt was lured out of retirement to call the historic Canada-Russia series in 1972. He was given the Order of Canada that same year. Hewitt died in 1985 at the age of 82.
Tags: Foster  Hewitt  hockey  broadcaster 
Added: 7th January 2010
Views: 1504
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Posted By: Lava1964

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