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The Evening Gown the FASHION POLICE would have something to say about this gown, but i LOVE it!
Tags: vintage        fashion        evening  gown 
Added: 4th February 2009
Views: 1549
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Rhiannon performed by Fleetwood Mac Fleetwood Mac-Rhiannon-1976..."Rhiannon" is a popular single released by Fleetwood Mac in 1976. The song was the first example of Stevie Nicks' prolific writing, performing and singing within the band. In later years her performing and singing would become even more important in the band's artistry. Nicks is renowned for dramatic live performances of Rhiannon in flowing gowns. "Rhiannon" was voted #488 in The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time by Rolling Stone magazine. (Most of us, some more then others can never forget this song and the great on stage performance of the band)
Tags: Rhiannon 
Added: 25th March 2009
Views: 3216
Rating:
Posted By: mia_bambina
Lucille Ball in Roberta This is a shot from the 1935 black and white movie starring Irene Dunne as a deposed White Russian princess who has become a famed Parisian couturier. Dunne is the partner of "Roberta" (Helen Westley), who passes away, leaving her half of the business to American football player Randolph Scott—who of course knows next to nothing about the gown business, and couldn't care less anyway. Keep an eye out for a blond Lucille Ball as a fashion model. . .
Tags: Roberta      film      Lucille  Ball      Irene      Dunne      Helen  Westley      Randolph  Scott     
Added: 3rd April 2008
Views: 6059
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Dance Cards Here was a quaint custom that has sadly disappeared: Dance cards. A dance card was commonly used by a young woman to record the names of the gentlemen with whom she intended to dance each successive dance at a formal ball. They appear to have originated in 18th century, but their use first became widespread in 19th century Vienna. Typically a card would list of all the dances for the evening and their style: for example, waltz, polka, or quadrille. Opposite each dance was a space to record the name of the scheduled partner for that dance. After the event ended, the card was frequently kept by the young lady as a souvenir of the evening. Typically, it would have a cover indicating the date and sponsoring organization of the ball and a decorative cord by which it could be attached to a lady's wrist or ball gown. From the 19th century until the First World War, dance cards for the elite of Austria-Hungary were often very elaborate, with some even incorporating precious metals and jewels. In modern times the expression "dance card" is often used metaphorically, as when someone says "pencil me into your dance card," meaning "find some time to spend with me". Conversely, someone's "dance card is full" implies that even though they may be interested, they have no time for another person.
Tags: dance  cards 
Added: 3rd September 2011
Views: 3106
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dagmar - First Late-Night TV Star Anyone remember Dagmar? Dagmar Lewis (born Virginia Ruth in 1921) was an American actress, model and television personality of the 1950s. As a statuesque, busty blonde, she became the first major female star of television, receiving much press coverage during that decade. After her marriage to Angelo Lewis in 1941, she moved to New York where he was a naval officer. She adopted Jennie Lewis as her stage name (taken from her married name, Virginia Lewis). To keep busy, she became a fashion photographer's model--which got the buxom blonde noticed. Although she had no show business experience, she was cast in a Broadway musical revue, Laffing Room Only. In 1950, Lewis was hired by Jerry Lester as his sidekick for NBC's first late-night TV show: Broadway Open House (1950–52), the forerunner to The Tonight Show. Lester renamed her Dagmar. Billed as "a girl singer," she was instructed to wear a low-cut gown, sit on a stool, and play the role of a stereotypical dumb blonde. No one remembers her ever singing on the show. With tight sweaters displaying her curvy 5'8" figure (measuring 42"-23"-39"), her dim-bulb character was an immediate success, and the show emerged as a surprise hit for NBC. Dagmar soon attracted much more attention than Lester and showed that she was both bright and quick-witted when she appeared in sketches. Lester enjoyed making occasional jokes about her "hidden talents." Her personal appearances created a sensation, leading to much press coverage and a salary increase from $75 to $1,250 per week. With Dagmar getting all the attention, Lester walked off his own show in May 1951, and Dagmar carried on as the program's sole host. On July 16, 1951, she was featured on the cover of Life Magazine. However, Broadway Open House came to an end one month later. Undaunted, Dagmar became one of the leading personalities of early 1950s live television, doing sketch comedy on Milton Berle's Texaco Star Theater, The Bob Hope Show, and several other programs. In 1952, she hosted Dagmar's Canteen, a 15-minute program that aired at 12:15 a.m. on Saturday nights. She sang, danced, interviewed servicemen, and performed comedy, but the show was cancelled after just 12 weeks. She died a month before her 80th birthday in 2001.
Tags: Dagmar  bimbo  blonde  TV  starlet 
Added: 17th June 2012
Views: 8073
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dorothy Arnold - Missing Socialite One of the most intriguing missing persons cases in American history centers around a 24-year-old New York socialite, Dorothy Arnold, who seemingly vanished into thin air one afternoon in New York City in 1910. Arnold was from a wealthy family, the daughter of the 73-year-old head of a prosperous import company and the niece of a Supreme Court justice. Educated at Bryn Mawr, Dorothy was an aspiring writer. On Monday, December 12, 1910, Dorothy left her New York City home at about 11 a.m. telling her mother she would be shopping for an evening gown for an upcoming event. Dorothy left the house with only the clothes on her back and about $30. Arnold went to a candy store and a bookstore where she bought items using the Arnold family credit. When she left the bookstore, Dorothy encountered Gladys King, a friend. King was the last known person to have seen Dorothy. No one who saw Dorothy on December 12 noticed anything odd about her behavior. She apparently never purchased the dress, so she had either lied to her mother or had been interrupted before she could buy it. On the day of her disappearance, Dorothy was fashionably dressed and was a familiar face in New York City. Therefore, it is unlikely that Dorothy could have ventured far without being noticed. That evening, when Dorothy strangely had not returned home for dinner, the Arnold family began making inquiries among her friends. They were unable to turn up any news of their daughter. Fearing some sort of scandal, Dorothy's family did not call the police right away--which was typical of the era. Anyone calling the Arnold home inquiring about Dorothy was told she was in bed with a headache. Dorothy's parents hired a lawyer who privately tried to find Dorothy for six weeks. His investigation got nowhere, so the police were finally contacted in late January of 1911. By that time, Dorothy's trail had gone hopelessly cold. Newspapers played up the story--especially in New York City. It led to several hoaxes, including two phony ransom notes being sent to the Arnold home and a postcard purportedly sent overseas by Dorothy. These were quickly dismissed as inauthentic. After 75 days, the police closed the case under the assumption that Dorothy was dead. However as late as 1935 the New York City police were still receiving tips about alleged sightings of Dorothy. So what happened to Dorothy? She had been unofficially engaged to a 42-year-old man named George (Junior) Griscom--a situation which displeased her family who considered him to be a loafer. There was absolutely no evidence that she and Junior had a falling out or had run away together. In fact, Junior put out several ads imploring Dorothy to contact him, but to no avail. He eventually moved on with his life. Another theory was that Dorothy was upset that her parents had cruelly mocked her for wanting to become a writer and because two of her stories had recently been rejected by magazines. Thus some people speculate Dorothy committed suicide believing that she was a failure. Still no one had evidence that she was anything but happy on the day she disappeared. Yet another theory is that Dorothy died at an illegal abortion clinic and her body was swiftly incinerated in the building's furnace--which was known to happen in 1910. In 1921, John H. Ayers, who headed New York City's Missing Persons Bureau, curiously told an auditorium filled with high school students that Dorothy's fate had always been known to the police and her family but he did not elaborate any further. When journalists pressed him for more details, he quickly claimed he had been misquoted.
Tags: missing  persons  case  Dorothy  Arnold 
Added: 16th January 2015
Views: 2127
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Black Tom Explosion 1916 Even though the United States was neutral nation in 1916, it was still occasionally affected by acts of war. The most notable to happen on land was the Black Tom explosion on July 30, 1916, in Jersey City, NJ. It was an act of sabotage by German agents to destroy American-made munitions that were to be supplied to the Allies in the First World War. Black Tom was originally a man-made island constructed around a large black rock in New York Harbor that was a well-known hazard to naval navigation. It was eventually connected by the Lehigh Valley Railroad to the mainland and was absorbed into Jersey City. It became a major munitions depot even before the war. Shortly after midnight on July 30, 1916, a series of small fires was discovered on the pier. Some guards tried to fight the fires while others fled, fearing an explosion. They had good reason to fear such a calamity as 2 million pounds of explosives and small arms were stored on Black Tom Island awaiting shipment to Czarist Russia. The feared explosion came; actually there were several explosions. The first and biggest occurred at 2:08 a.m. It had the force of an earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale. Flying fragments caused more than $100,000 in damages to the Statue of Liberty on its gown and torch. (To date, the torch has never been reopened to the public.) Windows 25 miles were shattered and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia. Four people were definitely killed by the blast--including an infant. Some sources claim the fatality total was seven. Blame originally was directed at Black Tom Island watchmen who had lit small smudge-pot fires to drive away mosquitoes, but they were quickly absolved of blame when the true nature of the fires showed obvious evidence of arson. German saboteurs were blamed for the incident which caused $20 million in damages. The Leigh Valley Railroad successfully sued the German government after the war but had no success in collecting any compensation until 1953 when the West German government agreed to pay $95 million. The final payment was made in 1979.
Tags: Black  Tom  Explosion  1916  German  sabotage 
Added: 13th January 2018
Views: 1203
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Joe Ferguson Throw -1974 World Series One of the most spectacular throws in World Series history was by Los Angeles Dodgers' right fielder Joe Ferguson who unloaded a dart to gun gown Sal Bando of the Oakland A's at home plate in Game #1 of the 1974 Fall Classic. Vin Scully, Tony Kubek and Curt Gowdy are broadcasting the game for NBC.
Tags: baseball  World  Series  Joe  Ferguson  Sal  Bando 
Added: 23rd March 2019
Views: 1186
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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