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Montreal Maroons 1924-1938 For 14 seasons from 1924-25 through 1937-38 there were two National Hockey League teams located in Montreal. Clad in the color for which they were named, the Montreal Maroons were created, supposedly, as the city's anglophone team while the older, established Canadiens represented Montreal's French-speaking populace. The famous Montreal Forum was actually built as the Maroons' home arena--not the Canadiens'. The Maroons lost their first game 2-1 to another expansion team, the Boston Bruins, on December 1, 1924, The very next season, however, the Maroons won the Stanley Cup, defeating the Victoria Cougars three games to one in a best-of-five final. (That was the last year in which non-NHL team were permitted to compete for pro hockey's holy grail.) Despite usually being a competitive team for most of their short existence--they also won the Stanley Cup in 1934-35--the Maroons clearly were the city's second choice in popularity. The Great Depression also hurt the team at the gate. The Maroons finished dead last in NHL attendance three years in a row during the 1930s. After an uncharacteristic last-place finish in 1937-38, the Montreal Maroons ceased operations. Their final game, fittingly, was a 6-3 loss to their intra-city rivals the Montreal Canadiens on March 17, 1938. Eleven Maroon players are enshrined in the Hockey Hall of fame as well as five Maroon coaches. Overall, the Maroons finished with an all-time regular-season record of 271 wins, 260 losses and 91 ties. The team's all-time leading scorer, Nels Stewart, held the NHL record for career goals (324) until 1952. He scored 185 of them as a member of the Maroons.
Tags: Montreal  Maroons  defunct  NHL  team 
Added: 21st January 2016
Views: 1141
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Posted By: Lava1964
Partially Completed Eiffel Tower - 1888 The Eiffel Tower, the famous Parisian landmark, was fully completed by 1889--in time for that year's World's Fair and to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution. Here's what the tower looked like in 1888 when only the base of the tourist attraction had been completed. (The completed tower stands 324 meters in height--the equivalent of an 81-story skyscraper.)
Tags: Eiffel  Tower  Paris  construction 
Added: 14th February 2016
Views: 1125
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Posted By: Lava1964
Schumacher-Battiston Incident - 1982 World Cup Here's one of the worst fouls you'll ever see at a sporting event--and it went unpunished because none of the officials saw it. During a semifinal match at the 1982 World Cup soccer tournament in Spain. West German goalkeeper Toni Schumacher leveled France's Patrick Battiston with a reckless challenge moments after Battiston missed a terrific scoring opportunity. Apparently few people saw what had occurred as everyone's attention--including the referee's--was focused on the ball going wide of the West German goal. How badly was Battiston injured? The French player lost two teeth, suffered three cracked ribs, had damaged vertebrae, and was knocked unconscious! No foul was called on Schumacher. After a 3-3 deadlock, the West Germans won the game in a penalty shootout.
Tags: soccer  Toni  Schumacher  Patrick  Battiston  1982  World  Cup  incident 
Added: 12th June 2017
Views: 883
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Posted By: Lava1964
Final Scene from The Big Parade - 1925 One of film history's largely forgotten masterpieces is The Big Parade (1925). Directed by King Vidor, the movie stars John Gilbert as James (Jim) Apperson, the pampered son of an American industrialist who, while watching a military procession, is persuaded by his patriotic friends to enlist in the US Army to fight in the First World War. The main female character, Melisande, a French farm girl, is played by Renee Adoree. The plot has Jim's unit being billeted on the grounds of Melisande's farm and the two falling in love--despite the language barrier and Jim being engaged to a girl back home named Justyn. The two lovers are separated as Jim's unit is called to the front. Jim is wounded in the leg. While recuperating in a hospital, Jim learns that Melisande's farm has changed hands several times and that Melisande and her mother are among hundreds of refugees who have fled their homes. Just before Jim returns stateside as an amputee, his mother discovers that Justyn has fallen in love with Jim's brother. Accordingly, Jim's mother urges him to return to France to look for Melisande. Here is the climactic scene when Jimmy and Melisande reunite.
Tags: The  Big  Parade  John  Gilbert  Renee  Adoree  1925  final  scene  silent  film 
Added: 12th June 2017
Views: 826
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Posted By: Lava1964
Cheers - Death of Eddie Lebec Jay Thomas, who appeared as Eddie Lebec in nine episodes of the TV sitcom Cheers, died from cancer on August 24, 2017 at the age of 69. On Cheers, Lebec was a French-Canadian goalie for the Boston Bruins whom Carla (Rhea Perlman) meets while he is riding a hot streak. However, as soon as Eddie and Carla start dating, he slumps badly. (To thwart the jinx, Eddie and Carla continue to date, but they go through a 'breakup' ritual before every game.) The Eddie Lebec character was popular, so the show's writers decided to have Carla and Eddie marry. However, Thomas, who hosted a radio show, got himself into hot water one day when a caller innocently asked him what it was like to be a Cheers cast member. The irrepressible Tomas replied, Its brutal. I have to kiss Rhea Perlman. Perlman happened to be listening to the broadcast--and Thomas never made another appearance on Cheers. The show's writers had to come up with a way to drop Eddie Lebec from the show. In his final episode on Cheers, Eddie's hockey career was over so he had gotten a job in an ice show as a skating penguin. The writers came up with the memorable idea of killing Eddie off in a Zamboni accident in an episode cleverly titled "Death Takes a Holiday on Ice." (The premise is quite ridiculous: Have you ever seen how slowly a Zamboni moves? Its design makes it almost impossible for a Zamboni to run over anyone.) Despite the absurdity of the plot twist, Cheers fans loved it. Eddie's death also led to a further plot development: At Eddie's funeral it was revealed that he was a bigamist whose second wife was strikingly similar to Carla! According to writer Ken Levine, this idea worked well as it made Eddie look like a heel, thus viewers were happy he was no longer part of the show.
Tags: Jay  Thomas  Eddie  Lebec  Cheers 
Added: 27th August 2017
Views: 1076
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Posted By: Lava1964
Maureen Connolly - Tragic Tennis Star You can watch tennis for the next hundred years and you'll never witness anyone match the dominance that Maureen (Little Mo) Connolly had at the majors between 1951 and 1954. She entered nine Grand Slam singles events--and won every one. Connolly first took up tennis at the age of 10 at San Diego's public courts. Although she was naturally left-handed, her first coach, Wilbur Folsom, converted Connolly to a right-hander. She became an excellent baseline player who, despite her small 5'5" frame, could strike powerful shots with either her backhand or her forehand. By the time Connolly was 14, she was the junior (under 18) female champion of the United States. She began competing in adult events shortly thereafter. Connolly won Forest Hills (the amateur-era forerunner of the US Open) just before her 17th birthday in 1951. In 1952 Connolly won both Wimbledon and Forest Hills. She didn't enter the French or Australian championships. In 1953, however, Connolly entered all four major championships and took them all, becoming the first female to achieve the calendar Grand Slam--a feat that's only been equaled twice in all the years since. In capturing the Grand Slam, Connolly lost just a single set in the four tourneys (to Susan Chatrier in a quarterfinal match in Paris). Entering the 1953 Wimbledon final, Connolly had only dropped eight games in five matches! At the Australian Championships, Connolly only lost 10 games in six matches before the final! Connolly began 1954 just as strongly. She successfully defended both her French and Wimbledon titles. Sadly, about two weeks after her third successive Wimbledon triumph, Connolly was badly injured in a horseback riding mishap when her horse was spooked by a passing cement truck. Her right leg was so badly fractured that it was nearly amputated. She was not quite 20 years old but her tennis career was over. In her nine Grand Slam singles finals, Connolly dropped just one set--and that was in her first one. Shortly after announcing her retirement from competitive tennis in 1955, Connolly married Norman Brinker, who had been a member of the American equestrian team at the 1952 Olympics. They had two daughters. Connolly was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 1966. She battled the disease for three years before succumbing to it on June 21, 1969. She was just 34 years old.
Tags: tennis  Maureen  Connolly  grand  slam  champion 
Added: 17th September 2017
Views: 1176
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Posted By: Lava1964
Russian Coronation Free Beer Riot - 1896 On Tuesday, May 26, 1896, the elaborate coronation of Czar Nicholas II of Russia occurred in Moscow before an enormous crowd of onlookers. The following day, May 27, to celebrate the new emperor's reign, a massive party was scheduled for the general public. It was to be a large festival with free food, beer, and souvenir cups. The site chosen for the party was Khodynka Field outside Moscow, a venue normally used for military exercises. Khodynka was selected as it was the only place near Moscow large enough to hold the enormous number of citizens who would likely attend. Before the food and drink was handed out, rumors spread that there would not be enough for everyone. As a result, much of the crowd stampeded to get their share. Individuals were tripped and trampled upon. Many hapless onlookers suffocated in the dirt of the field. Of the estimated 100,000 people gathered for the party, 1,389 individuals died and roughly another 1,300 were injured. The Khodynka Tragedy, as it came to be known, was seen as an ill omen for the new czar. Furthermore, the Czar was badly advised to attend a ball on the evening of the catastrophe hosted by the French ambassador to Russia. Nicholas privately wished to observe a period of prayer and mourning for the dead, but his advisors and relatives insisted that he would damage critical Russian-French relations if he did not attend the ball. The decision was seen as callous by many Russian peasants who perceived Nicholas to be frivolous and uncaring toward his subjects.
Tags: Russian  history  Czar  Nicholas  coronation  royalty 
Added: 1st July 2018
Views: 1696
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Posted By: Lava1964

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