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Jack Lalanne   Unhappy people He was so ahead of his time. I saw him on a commercial the other night and you wouldn't believe he is 90 !!!
Tags: Jack  Lalanne      Unhappy  people 
Added: 8th October 2007
Views: 20082
Rating:
Posted By: Freckles
Your Hit Parade  Opening Opening Intro for the 50's Television show "Your Hit Parade". Your Hit Parade was a popular radio and television program, sponsored by Lucky Strike cigarettes and broadcast from 1935 to 1955 on radio and telecast from 1950 to 1959. During this 24-year run, the show had 19 orchestra leaders and 52 singers or groups. Each Saturday evening at 8pm, a hit parade of the more popular and bestselling songs of the week were presented. The original format involved a presentation of the top 15 tunes. Later, a countdown with fanfares led to the top three finalists, with the number one song for the finale. Occasional performances of standards and other favorite songs from the past were known as "Lucky Strike Extras." Listeners were informed that "Your Hit Parade survey checks the best sellers on sheet music and phonograph records, the songs most heard on the air and most played on the automatic coin machines, an accurate, authentic tabulation of America's taste in popular music." However, the exact procedure of this "authentic tabulation" remained a secret. Some believe song choices were often arbitrary due to various performance and production factors. The show's ad agencies never revealed the specific sources or the methods that were used to determine the top hits.
Tags: your  hit  parade  50s  television  music 
Added: 11th October 2007
Views: 2660
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Posted By: Naomi
Worlds Costliest  Ad     After 606 Takes And you thought those people that set up a room full of dominos to knock over were amazing... believe it or not, just unbelievable!! When the ad was pitched to senior executives, they signed off on it immediately without any hesitation, including the costs. There are six, and only six, hand-made Honda Accords in the world. To the horror of Honda engineers, the filmmakers disassembled two of them to make this film. There are no computer graphics or digital tricks in the film. Everything you see really happened in real time, exactly as you see it. The film took 606 takes. On the first 605 takes, something, usually very minor, didn't work. They would then have to set the whole thing up again. The crew spent weeks shooting night and day. The film cost six million dollars and took three months to complete including full engineering of the sequence. In addition, it is two minutes long so every time Honda airs the film on British television, they're shelling out enough dough to keep any one of us in clover for a lifetime. Everything you see in the film (aside from the walls, floor, ramp and complete Honda Accord) are parts from those two cars. And how about those funky windshield wipers...?? At a cost of $6.2 million for 90-sec commercial, this is the world's costliest ad and hands down winner in the world of ads.
Tags: honda  accord  advertising  campaigns 
Added: 19th October 2007
Views: 90145
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Posted By: Naomi
Lets Make A Deal Clips Here are a couple of clips from the zany game show Let's Make A Deal. Much like Deal Or No Deal, LMAD relied on the contestants' abilities to deal with psychological pressure and greed. The affable Monty Hall kept the show moving. More than 3,800 LMAD episodes ran on NBC and ABC from 1963 through 1976. It also had several incarnations as a syndicated show.
Tags: Lets  Make  A  Deal 
Added: 23rd February 2009
Views: 4101
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dizzy Tommy Roe i'm so dizzy watching those ballons . . and hoping that his lips would match the music, but i do believe he is lip-syncing. I LOVED this song from the 60's!
Tags: music  Dizzy  Tommy  Roe 
Added: 22nd October 2007
Views: 2926
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Posted By: Teresa
British Govt Tested LSD on Troops in 50s Can you believe any government would actually perform these kinds of tests on their troops? Makes you wonder if they were also dumb enough to let them handle loaded weapons...
Tags: lsd  testing    british  troops  50s 
Added: 25th October 2007
Views: 1977
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Posted By: Sophia
     Remembering Anne Murray OK Lava, this one's for you. Anne Murray is a Canadian singer born in Springhill, Nova Scotia, known for her rich alto voice and her choice of songs appealing to listeners over a broad spectrum, including Pop, Country and Adult Contemporary styles. For many, her fame as the representative Canadian singer is rivaled only by Gordon Lightfoot. After the success of "Snowbird" in 1970, Anne had a number of subsequent singles that have charted both pop and country simultaneously. During 1970s and early 1980s, her hits included "Danny's Song" (1972), "He Thinks I Still Care" (1974), "You Needed Me" (1978), "I Just Fall In Love Again," "Shadows in the Moonlight" and "Broken Hearted Me" (all 1979), "Could I Have This Dance" (1980), "Blessed Are the Believers" (1981), and "A Little Good News" (1983). Her hits started to taper off into the mid '80s, and her last top 100 charting pop hit was "Now and Forever (You and Me)" from 1986, it also was her last #1 on the country charts.
Tags: anne  murray  you  needed  me  canadian  singers 
Added: 25th October 2007
Views: 2345
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Posted By: Naomi
The Addams Family Theme I Can't believe no one posted this for Halloween!
Tags: The  Addams  Family  Theme   
Added: 31st October 2007
Views: 1430
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Posted By: Cliffy
The Munsters I Can't believe no one posted this for Halloween!
Tags: The  Munsters 
Added: 31st October 2007
Views: 1444
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Posted By: Cliffy
1974 - Japanese WWII Soldier Finally Surrenders Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier, refused to believe the Second World War had ended--and continued his mission of clandestine sabotage for twenty-nine years. On December 26, 1944, Onoda was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines. His orders were to hamper enemy activity on the island, including destroying the airstrip and the pier at the harbor. Onoda's orders also stated that under no circumstances was he to surrender or take his own life. When he landed on the island, Onoda joined forces with other Japanese soldiers. The officers in the group all outranked Onoda, which prevented him from carrying out his assignment. United States and Filipino forces retook Luband Island when they landed on February 28, 1945. Within a short time, all but Onoda and three other soldiers had either died or surrendered. Onoda, who had been promoted to lieutenant, ordered the men to take to the hills. Onoda continued his campaign as a Japanese holdout, initially living in the mountains with three fellow soldiers (Akatsu, Shimada and Kozuka). Although hostilities ceased in August 1945, Onoda and his comrades were oblivious to Japan's unconditional surrender. Thus the foursome carried out guerrilla activities, killed some 30 Filipino citizens, and engaged in several shootouts with the police for years. As early as 1945 Onoda saw a leaflet saying the war had ended, but he and his comrades thought it was enemy propaganda. They continued their bloody raids against local farmers and police. Even leaflets from General Tomoyuki Yamashita of the Fourteenth Area Army failed to convince the maverick soldiers to capitulate. One of the four, Yuichi Akatsu, walked away from the others in September 1949 and surrendered to Filipino forces in 1950 after six months on his own. In 1952 letters and family pictures were dropped from aircraft urging the remaining three to surrender, but they concluded it too was a ruse. Shimada was shot in the leg during a gun battle with local fishermen in June 1953. Onoda nursed him back to health. On May 7, 1954, Shimada was killed by a shot fired by a search party. Kozuka was killed by two shots fired by local police on October 19, 1972, leaving Onoda alone. He and Onoda were burning local farmers' rice harvest as part of their guerrilla activities. On February 20, 1974, Onoda met a young Japanese man, Norio Suzuki, who was on a personal quest to find him. Onoda described this moment in a 2010 interview: "This hippie boy Suzuki came to the island to listen to the feelings of a Japanese soldier. Suzuki asked me why I would not come out..." Onoda and Suzuki became friends, but Onoda still refused to surrender, saying that he was waiting for orders from a superior officer. Suzuki returned to Japan with photographs of himself and Onoda as proof of their encounter. The Japanese government located Onoda's commanding officer, Major Yoshimi Taniguchi, who had become a bookseller in civilian life. On March 9, 1974, Taniguchi met with Onoda and persuaded him to surrender. Onoda turned over his sword, his rifle (still in working order), 500 rounds of ammunition, and several hand grenades, as well as a dagger his mother had given him in 1944. Though he had killed numerous civilians since the war's end, Onoda received a pardon from Filipino president Ferdinand Marcos. Upon his return to Japan, Onoda was uncomfortable with his celebrity status and the erosion of traditional Japanese values. Onoda moved to Brazil where he became a successful cattle rancher. He occasionally returned to Japan to promote conservative causes, including organizing educational camps for wayward Japanese youths. As of December 2013, Onoda was still alive at age 91.
Tags: WWII  Japanese  soldier  surrenders  1974 
Added: 28th December 2013
Views: 1593
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Posted By: Lava1964

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