Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Disco Demolition Night - 1979 Disco Demolition Night--one of baseball's most ill-conceived promotions--caused a rare MLB forfeit on July 12, 1979. It occurred at Chicago's Comiskey Park between games of a Thursday doubleheader between the hometown White Sox and visiting Detroit Tigers. Popular Chicago disc jockey Steve Dahl had been fired from radio station WDAI when he mentioned--on the air--that he listened to the album-oriented rock of rival station WLUP rather than his own station's fare--predominantly disco tunes. Dahl was subsequently hired by WLUP, known locally as "The Loop." The 1979 White Sox were a mediocre team struggling to attract decent crowds, so the team's management was willing to try anything to try to draw new fans. Dahl, in conjunction with Mike Veeck (son of then-White Sox owner Bill Veeck), devised a promotion: Anyone who brought a disco record to the ballpark would be admitted for just 98 cents. The records would be collected, placed in a large crate in center field, and blown up by Dahl between games. Dahl hyped the event on The Loop, hoping that 12,000 people might show up--double the typical Thursday attendance at Comiskey Park. The turnout exceeded all expectations. An estimated 90,000 people turned up at the 52,000-seat stadium. When the box office stopped selling tickets, thousands of people still got in by climbing over walls. It was an atypical baseball crowd to be sure. Broadcasters Harry Caray and Jimmy Piersall commented on the "strange people" wandering throughout the stands. When the crate was filled with records, stadium staff stopped collecting them. The "fans" who still had records soon realized they were shaped like frisbees. A few began to throw records from the stands during the game. After the first game, a 4-1 Tigers' win, Dahl, clad in army fatigues and a helmet, proceeded to center field. The crate containing the records was rigged with explosives. Dahl led the crowd in chants of "Disco sucks!" prior to triggering the explosion. When detonated, the explosives tore a hole in the outfield grass and a small fire began burning. Dahl triumphantly circled the warning track in a jeep before leaving the field. Once Dahl left, the White Sox started warming up for the second game, but thousands of fans rushed the field. Some lit more fires. Others pulled down the batting cage and wrecked it. Bases were stolen and chunks of the outfield grass were ripped away. Most trespassers wandered around aimlessly, though a number of participants burned banners, sat on the grass, ran from security and police and threw records into the air. Veeck and Caray used the PA system to implore the fans to vacate the field, but to no avail. Eventually the field was cleared by police in riot gear. Six people reported minor injuries and 39 were arrested for disorderly conduct. The field was so badly torn up that the umpires decided the second game could not be played. The next day American League president Lee MacPhail forfeited the second game to the Tigers on the grounds that the White Sox had not provided acceptable playing conditions. For the rest of the season, fielders complained about Comiskey Park's playing surface being substandard. No AL game has been forfeited since that night.
Tags: baseball  riot  disco  Comiskey  Park 
Added: 30th January 2012
Views: 5801
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Michael Jordan - Baseball Career The sports world was stunned by Michael Jordan's sudden retirement from the NBA in 1993. Equally surprising, in 1994 the 31-year-old Jordan decided to pursue a career as a professional baseball player in the Chicago White Sox organization. He spent the 1994 season as an outfielder with the AA Birmingham Barons of the Southern League. Jordan recorded 88 hits in 436 at-bats for a paltry .202 batting average. He had three home runs, 51 RBIs, and stole 30 bases. Defensivley he committed 11 errors and had a .952 fielding percentage. Jordan returned to the NBA in 1995.
Tags: Michael  Jordan  baseball 
Added: 20th February 2012
Views: 2364
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Burt Mustin on Tonight Show - 1974 You might not know his name but you should recall Burt Mustin's face. For years he appeared in movies and TV series as a lovable elderly gentleman. He appeared on The Andy Griffith Show, Leave It To Beaver, Batman, Get Smart, and perhaps most famously on four episodes of All in the Family. (Mustin played Mr. Quigley, a gent who "escaped" from the boredom of the seniors' home where Edith Bunker volunteered.) As this clip shows, as a 90-year-old in 1974, he appeared on The Tonight Show where he recalled attending the 1903 World Series!
Tags: Burt  Mustin  actor  Tonight  Show 
Added: 14th March 2018
Views: 1399
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Aloysius Travers - Emergency Pitcher One of the most interesting pitching lines in MLB history belongs to Aloysius (Al) Travers, a 20-year old seminary student, who pitched once for the Detroit Tigers in 1912--a complete-game 24-2 loss to the defending World Series champion Philadelphia A's. Of course there has to be an explanation: Travers wasn't really a pitcher! He was hastily recruited among a group of local Philadelphia amateur ballplayers to replace the striking Detroit Tigers. The Tigers' regulars walked off the field shortly before game time at Philadelphia's Shibe Park on Saturday, May 18, 1912 to protest the suspension of center fielder Ty Cobb. (Cobb had jumped into the stands during a game in New York three days earlier to fight a heckler.) Faced with a potential forfeit and a huge fine, the Tigers' management recruited Travers and other amateur players as emergency replacements. Travers was the ersatz Tigers' only pitcher--and he wasn't even good enough to make the baseball team at St. Joseph's College. Be that as it may, Travers was forced to face some of the most vaunted hitters in the majors in front of 20,000 fans. In eight innings, he allowed 24 runs (14 earned), and 26 hits. Travers also walked seven A's and struck out one. He was paid $25 for his efforts. Travers, shown here in a photograph taken late in his life, eventually became a priest. To date, Travers is the only priest known to have pitched in an MLB game.
Tags: baseball  Aloysius  Travers  Detroit  Tigers 
Added: 18th July 2012
Views: 2649
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Willie Mays on Whats My Line From July 11, 1954, Willie Mays, the superb center fielder of the New York Giants, is the mystery guest on What's My Line. Predictably, Arlene Francis, a Giants' fan, identifies him.
Tags: Willie  Mays  baseball  WML 
Added: 12th April 2013
Views: 1902
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Mike Tyson - Baseball Player Here's a quick way to make a devious buck or two: Bet someone that Mike Tyson once played Major League Baseball for the St. Louis Cardinals. You'd be correct. A Mike Tyson (not the Mike Tyson) was an infielder who spent most of his 10-year career (1972 to 1981) with the Cardinals. Here's his baseball card as proof!
Tags: baseball  Mike  Tyson 
Added: 4th September 2013
Views: 849
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
MLB Player Johnny Dickshot One of the more curious names in MLB history belongs to Johnny Dickshot, a journeyman outfielder who played six seasons in the big leagues between 1936 and 1945. He played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, New York Giants and Chicago White Sox. Dickshot's nickname was 'Ugly.' Dickshot was not even his surname at birth: It was Dicksus.
Tags: MLB  Johnny  Dickshot 
Added: 16th August 2014
Views: 1868
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
John Glenn Returns To Space Tags: John  Glenn  Returns  To  Space  Space  Shuttle  NASA  National  Aeronautical  Space  Administration  elderly  senior  citizen  space  travel 
Added: 29th October 2015
Views: 796
Rating:
Posted By: pfc
The Rover Boys - Book Series The Rover Boys, or The Rover Boys Series for Young Americans, was a popular juvenile literature series authored by Arthur M. Winfield, a pseudonym for Edward Stratemeyer. Thirty titles were first published between 1899 and 1926. The original Rover Boys were brothers Tom, Sam, and Dick Rover. Their children (Fred, son of Sam Rover; Jack, son of Dick; Andy and Randy, twin sons of Tom) became the main characters of the shorter "second series" that began with Volume 21, The Rover Boys at Colby Hall, published in 1917. The elder Rovers continued making appearances in the second series. The Rovers were students at a military boarding school. They were adventurous, prank-playing, flirtatious, and often unchaperoned adolescents who were frequently causing mischief for authorities as well as criminals. The series often incorporated novel technology of the era, such as the automobile, airplanes (The Rover Boys in the Air) and news events, such as World War I. Although the last installment of the series was published in 1926, the whole Rover Boys series stayed in print for years afterward.
Tags: juvenile  literature  Rover  Boys 
Added: 10th November 2016
Views: 1046
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1972 World Series - McRae Flattens Green World Series baseball when men were men: It's Game #4 of the 1972 World Series. Cincinnati's Hal McRae is forced out at second base, but he makes sure A's infielder Dick Green won't turn a double play. Yes, McRae's maneuver was completely legal at the time.
Tags: 1972  World  Series  Hal  McRae 
Added: 25th June 2018
Views: 775
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 of 5 | Random