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                ELVIS  My Way This is Elvis in concert, taped live in June, two months before his passing on August 16, 1977. Even though his health had declined, his voice was still as strong and clear as it had always been.
Tags: elvis  presley  music   
Added: 16th August 2007
Views: 3303
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Posted By: Naomi
Louie Anderson at The 9th Annual Young Comedians Special 1984 Rodney Dangerfield Hosts the 9th Annual Young Comedians Special. Taped at his nightclub in New York City, Dangerfield performed and acted as host while he introduced several young comedians who were given the opportunity to perform. Louie Anderson was one of eleven children and was raised on the east side of Saint Paul, Minnesota. He feels that his first audience was his family and many of his early experiences are the cornerstone of his comedy act. He will have you in stitches talking about his dad. His material involves his relationship with his mother and father, and many life experiences. In 1999, Louie landed the role as host of the new version of Family Feud. He beat out popular country singer Dolly Parton for the role. Anderson asked former Feud host Richard Dawson to come on the premiere show to give him his blessing, but Dawson declined.
Tags: louie  anderson  rodney  dangerfield  stand  up  comics 
Added: 5th November 2007
Views: 4939
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Posted By: Guido
Disneys Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was first released in 1937. It was the first animated feature film produced by Walt Disney. It was the first full-length animated feature to become widely successful within the English-speaking world, and the first to be filmed in Technicolor. It made its premiere at the Carthay Circle Theater on December 21, 1937, and was released to theaters by RKO Radio Pictures on February 4, 1938. Walt Disney had to literally fight to get the film produced. Both his brother Roy, and his wife, Lillian, attempted to talk him out of it, and the Hollywood movie industry mockingly referred to the film as 'Disney's Folly' while it was in production. He even had to mortgage his house to help finance the film's production, which eventually ran up a total cost of just over $1.5 million, a whopping sum for a feature film in 1937. It has been well documented that Adolf Hitler watched this film with a room full of children, and was delighted by Disney's adaptation of the German fairy tale. In fact, Hitler offered Disney anything he wanted in exchange for Disney's creation of feature-length animated features in Germany. Though this is the basis for the 'Walt Disney is a Nazi' rumors, Disney's biographer Bob Thomas proved that Disney declined Hitler's invitation, and in fact soon entered production on such anti-German projects as 'Der Fuhrer's Face' and 'Victory Through Air Power'.
Tags: snow  white  and  the  seven  dwarfs  walt  disney  animated  films  30 
Added: 21st January 2008
Views: 1874
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Posted By: Naomi
Denver Declines 1976 Winter Olympics Remember Denver hosting the 1976 Winter Olympics? No? That's because the Colorado capital was supposed to host the Games but didn't. In May 1970, the International Olympic Committee chose Denver to host '76 Winter Games ahead of bids from locales in Switzerland, Finland, and Canada. The USOC was ecstatic, but the taxpayers of Colorado were far less enthusiastic when they learned they would be footing much of the Games' costs. Within a very short time, an anti-Games movement grew in the state. During the 1972 election campaign, a plebiscite asked Coloradoans what they thought about a $5-million bond issue to finance the Games. On the same night Richard Nixon was re-elected, Colorado voters rejected the bond issue by a substantial 60/40 ratio. (In retrospect, that $5 million would have only covered a small fraction of the Games' actual costs.) A week after the voters spoke, Denver officially withdrew as the host city for 1976 Winter Olympics. The Games were hastily given to Innsbruck, Austria--where the 1964 Games had been held--because the facilities were already in place.
Tags: Olympics  Winter  Denver  declined 
Added: 16th September 2010
Views: 2843
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Posted By: Lava1964
Actor with Gone With the Wind opening line dies Fred Crane (pictured on the left), the one-time actor whose Southern accent won him a slot as one of Scarlett O'Hara's beaux and the opening line in "Gone With the Wind," has died. Crane, who played one of the Tarleton twins in the 1939 classic, was 90. His wife, Terry Lynn Crane, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution that he died on Thursday of complications from diabetes. She declined to give details. The couple lived in Barnesville south of Atlanta, where they owned a registered historic 1846 Confederate home and Civil War hospital which they operated as Tarleton Oaks, a bed and breakfast that they named for his character in the film, Brent Tarleton. The other Tarleton twin was played by George Reeves, who later gained TV immortality as Superman. Born in New Orleans, Crane stumbled into his role on "Gone With the Wind." He was not yet an actor when he accompanied a cousin who wanted to audition for the movie. The casting director liked the 20-year-old's Southern twang, and he wound up being cast.
Tags:  
Added: 25th August 2008
Views: 1526
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Posted By: Naomi
Murder of Bob Crane - 1978 Bob Crane will forever be remembered by TV fans as the actor who played Colonel Robert Hogan in the sitcom Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971. Crane was an amateur photographer. During the run of the show, co-star Richard Dawson introduced Crane to John Henry Carpenter, who worked with the video department at Sony Electronics and had access to early videotape recorders. Crane, a notorious womanizer, arranged for Carpenter to secretly and frequently photograph Crane's plentiful sexual escapades using this new technology. In 1978, Crane was appearing in Scottsdale, AZ in the play Beginner's Luck at the Windmill Dinner Theatre. On the night of June 28, Crane allegedly phoned Carpenter to tell him that their friendship was over. The following day, Crane was discovered bludgeoned to death in bed at the Winfield Place Apartments in Scottsdale. The murder weapon was never found--but police believed it to be a camera tripod. Crane was two weeks shy of his 50th birthday. Crane likely knew his assailant and was comfortable with him/her being in the room: He was known as a light sleeper and there were no signs of struggle. A bottle of scotch whiskey was found in Crane's room. Crane did not drink scotch. According to the program Cold Case Files, police at the crime scene noted that Carpenter called the apartment several times and did not seem surprised that the police were there. The car Carpenter had rented the previous day was impounded. In it, several blood smears were found that matched Crane's blood type. DNA testing, which might have confirmed that it was Crane's blood, did not exist yet. Due to insufficient evidence, Maricopa County Attorney Charles F. Hyder declined to file charges. The case was reopened in 1990, 12 years after the murder. A 1978 attempt to test the blood found in the car that Carpenter had rented resulted in a match to Bob Crane's blood type, but it failed to produce any additional results. DNA testing in 1990 could not be completed due to an insufficient remaining sample. Detectives Barry Vassall and Jim Raines instead hoped that additional witnesses and a picture of a possible piece of brain tissue found in the rental car (which had been lost since the original investigation) would incriminate Carpenter. He was arrested and held for trial after a preliminary hearing before a Superior Court judge who ruled that evidence justified a trial by jury. During Carpenter's 1994 trial, defense attorneys attacked the prosecution's case as circumstantial and inconclusive. They denied that Carpenter and Crane were on bad terms; they further said the theory that a camera tripod was the murder weapon was sheer speculation based on Carpenter's occupation. They also disputed the claim that the rediscovered photo showed brain tissue, and they noted that authorities did not have any such tissue. The defense pointed out that Crane had been videotaped and photographed in compromising sexual positions with numerous women, implying that a jealous person or someone fearing blackmail might have been the killer. Carpenter was found not guilty. He maintained his innocence until his own death on September 4, 1998. Bob Crane's murder remains officially unsolved.
Tags: Bob  Crane  murder  unsolved 
Added: 30th April 2012
Views: 5347
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Posted By: Lava1964
National Lampoon 1970 -1998 National Lampoon was an irreverent, ground-breaking American humor magazine. Its success led to a wide range of media productions associated with the magazine's brand name. The magazine ran from 1970 to 1998. It was originally a spinoff of the Harvard Lampoon. The magazine reached its height of popularity and critical acclaim during the 1970s, when it had a far-reaching effect on American humor. It spawned films, radio, live theatre, various kinds of recordings, and print products including books. Many members of the creative staff from the magazine went on to contribute to successful media of all types. During the magazine's most successful years, parody of every kind was a mainstay; surrealist content was also central to its appeal. Almost all the issues included long text pieces, shorter written pieces, a section of actual news items (dubbed "True Facts"), cartoons and comic strips. Most issues also included "Foto Funnies" or fumetti, which often featured nudity. The result was an unusual mix of intelligent, cutting-edge wit, and crass, bawdy frat house jesting. National Lampoon's humor often pushed far beyond the boundaries of what was generally considered appropriate and acceptable. Co-founder Henry Beard described the experience years later: "There was this big door that said, 'Thou shalt not.' We touched it, and it fell off its hinges." The magazine declined during the late 1980s and never recovered. It was kept alive minimally. (In 1992, for instance, only one issue was published.) It ceased publication altogether in 1998.
Tags: National  Lampoon 
Added: 5th February 2013
Views: 1564
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pickles the Pooch Finds Stolen World Cup The Jules Rimet Trophy--more commonly known as soccer's World Cup--was stolen on March 20, 1966. It was snatched from a glass display case at Methodist Central Hall in the Westminster section of London, England when the security guard assigned to keep an eye on it was temporarily absent from his post. England was going to host the quadrennial soccer tourney in three months--and the theft was a huge embarrassment for the country's Football Association. Shortly thereafter Joe Mears, the president of the F.A., received a parcel containing part of the World Cup. It was accompanied by a ransom note from a man calling himself Jackson. It demanded 15,000 British pounds in small denominations or else he would melt down the golden symbol of soccer supremacy. Mears contacted the police who arranged for a detective named Len Buggy to act on behalf of the ailing Mears who suffered from heart trouble. Buggy agreed to meet Jackson at London's Battersea Park at a specified time. Buggy brought a briefcase containing only about 500 pounds but Jackson did not bother to count it. Instead he got into Buggy's car and instructed him to drive aimlessly around London for 10 minutes. Jackson noticed a police van tailing the car. He panicked and attempted to escape on foot. He was quickly apprehended and identified as Edward Betchley, a 46-year-old army veteran. He claimed to be acting as a middle-man for a mysterious fellow he called The Pole. Betchley was the only man who was ever arrested in connection with the crime. He served two years in prison and died shortly thereafter of emphysema in 1969. The World Cup was missing for a week until David Corbett took Pickles--his mongrel dog--for a walk in the Norwich section of London on March 27. Pickles was drawn to a bundle tightly wrapped in newspaper lying near a parked car. Corbett removed the newspaper and there was the World Cup! Corbett immediately contacted police--who promptly interrogated him as a possible suspect. They finally let him go at 2:30 a.m. for lack of evidence. Pickles became a celebrity pooch. He was named Dog of the Year, was awarded a year's supply of dog food, appeared on several British TV shows, and had a feature role in a movie. Pickles was also invited to appear on TV programs in Chile, Yugoslavia and Brazil, but Corbett declined the offers as they would have required Pickles to go through strict quarantine measures and get several vaccinations to travel abroad. Corbett estimates that Pickles earned him 3000 pounds--money he put toward the purchase of a new house. When England won the World Cup on July 30, Pickles was invited to attend the team's private post-match victory party--a gathering so exclusive that even the players' wives were barred by the F.A.! Sadly Pickles accidentally suffocated in 1967 when his choke leash became entangled in a tree.
Tags: Pickles  dog  stolen  World  Cup  soccer 
Added: 19th February 2016
Views: 2414
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Posted By: Lava1964

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