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Ruth Etting This Photo of Ruth Etting was taken by Alfred Cheney Johnston, the official photographer of the Ziegfeld Follies and was taken in 1923. Ruth Etting (November 23, 1896 September 24, 1978) was an American singing star of the 1930s, who had over sixty hit recordings . . . as well as a quite colorful life: In 1937 she fell in love with her pianist, Myrl Alderman, who was consequently shot by her husband, Moe Snyder but survived. Snyder was jailed for the assault, and Etting divorced him on November 30, 1937. She married Alderman in December 1938, but the scandal effectively ended her career. . . today, she would just be MORE famous . .
Tags: glamour  photo  ruth  etting  singer  ziegfeld  follies  actress  roman  scandals  giftsof  gab  hips  hips  hooray 
Added: 16th August 2007
Views: 4337
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Posted By: Teresa
Another Colorful 50s Bathroom Look at the colors in this bathroom: coral, tan, aqua green, chrome door knobs, and the frosted glass between the bathtub and counter!
Tags: vintage      bathroom      1950s 
Added: 30th March 2008
Views: 3513
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Posted By: Teresa
Brooklyn Bridges 125th Birthday One Hundred and Twenty-five years after it's construction, the Brooklyn Bridge remains a powerful symbol of engineering might and imagination, and a revered fixture in the landscape of the nation's largest city. And it can still attract a crowd, like the one at the bridge's 125th birthday blowout Thursday night, May 22, 2008, which featured fireworks, a Navy flyover, a colorful new lighting scheme, a musical tribute to honor the storied span, and even a birthday cake in the shape of the bridge. ********* More Info in Comments:
Tags: brooklyn  bridge  125  years  new  york  celebration 
Added: 23rd May 2008
Views: 1579
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Posted By: Naomi
Ebbets Field Perhaps the most nostalgic ballpark of them all was Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, home of the National League's Dodgers for 45 seasons. Built in 1913, it was one of the era's new concrete and steel stadiums. It held 32,000 of baseball's most loyal and colorful supporters. Brooklyn fans witnessed some of the worst baseball ever played in the National League--and some of the very best. Despite consistently strong fan support since 1890, after the 1957 season owner Walter O'Malley ripped the heart out of the borough by uprooting the Dodgers and moving the club 3,000 miles away to Los Angeles. Most Brooklynites would have preferred seeing the Brooklyn Bridge dismantled rather than lose their beloved baseball club.
Tags: Ebbets  Field 
Added: 28th June 2008
Views: 1528
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ron Luciano Remember flamboyant American League baseball umpire Ron Luciano? During the 1970s he was the sport's most colorful arbiter. To relieve the tedium during dull games, Luciano would call runners out by pumping his fist numerous times. He would chat and joke with players, pat them on the back when they did well, and engage in bits of mischief. He had a long-running feud with Baltimore Orioles' manager Earl Weaver, whom he once ejected from both ends of a doubleheader. When Luciano quit umpiring to become a baseball broadcaster for NBC in 1980, Weaver said, 'I hope he takes this job more seriously than he took his last one.' Luciano authored five books of baseball anecdotes that were well received. So it came as a shock to the baseball community when the good-natured and well-liked Luciano inexplicably took hs own life in January 1995 at his home in Endicott, NY. He was 57. He left a suicide note containing detailed funeral instructions, but gave no reason for why he had decided to kill himself.
Tags: Ron  Luciano 
Added: 21st July 2008
Views: 3097
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Posted By: Lava1964
College Football Hoax 1941 In the autumn of 1941 many football fans began following the exploits of Plainfield (NJ) Teachers College. Too bad the school and its football team didn't really exist. It was an elaborate hoax that fooled hundreds of newspapers--even the New York Times' sports department--and thousands of college football fans. Stockbroker Morris Newburger and radio announcer Alexander (Bink) Dannenbaum concocted the idea of a mythical college football team. Using the name 'Jerry Croyden,' Newburger telephoned the New York City newspapers while Dannenbaum phoned the Philadelphia papers with fantastic stories of Plainfield's lopsided victories over nonexistent schools. With the newspapers printing Plainfield's scores week after week without question, Newburger and Dannenbaum got bolder. They began writing creative press releases about the new football powerhouse. One release praised Plainfield's star runningback, a 'full-blooded Chinese-American' sophomore named Johnny (The Celestial Comet) Chung. Chung's amazing abilities on the gridiron were credited to the handfuls of wild rice he ate during huddles. The Teachers' offense operated out of an innovative 'W' formation in which all the linemen but the center faced backwards. Colorful Hopalong Hobelitz was named as Plainfield's coach. Six weeks of spectacular Plainfield victories raised speculation that the team might secure a bid to a coveted bowl game. Curious journalist Red Smith of the Philadelphia Record journeyed to Plainfield to find the college. Of course, there wasn't one. Their fraud exposed, Newburger and Dannenbaum confessed--but only after Jerry Croyden issued one final bogus press release. It announced Plainfield was forfeiting its remaining games because Chung and several other players were declared academically ineligible after flunking their exams.
Tags: Plainfield  Teachers  College  football  hoax 
Added: 12th November 2009
Views: 4170
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Posted By: Lava1964
Civil War News Trading Cards Civil War News was a set of 88 collectible trading cards issued in the early 1960s by Topps. The set featured the colorful artwork of Norman Saunders, as well as three other artists. The card set was characterized by vivid colors, graphic depictions of violence, death, and blood (card #21 'Painful Death' being a prime example) and exaggerations of warfare. On the reverse, each card contained a brief history of a campaign, battle, or person. The information was presented in newspaper-article fashion complete with a headline. The complete set of cards, including a checklist, was first printed for the American market in 1962 to coincide with the centennial of the Civil War. A similar series with the same artwork was later issued in Canada. A&BC produced the sets in England. The cards came five to a wax pack with a stick of bubble gum. Also included in each package was a facsimile of Confederate paper currency. The original selling price was a nickel per package. Topps later issued the cards in cellophane-wrapped strips.
Tags: trading  cards  Civil  War  News 
Added: 9th February 2011
Views: 6316
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pop Qwiz Popcorn 1990 1990s Colors included yellow, blue, green, and a mystery bag with a surprise color. I'm not sure how many of you will remember this stuff, but it was just too weird not to mention. Video store chains became especially popular during the early 90s; a fact proven by the insidious amount of Blockbuster commercials strewn into TV breaks at the time. As more and more movie nights were staged from home, popcorn finally shed its "theater treat" stigma for good while sales soared. Those microwaveable bags of kernels became and remain a staple in most households, with several companies competing for the coveted top spot. Yes, there's competition in popcorn. So how do you make one popcorn more attractive than the other? For the most part, it's all the same shit. Covering the packaging with pretty colors and in-your-face fonts only took these companies so far, and while dubious additions like cheddar dust and Cajun red spice helped differentiate the products, General Mills had something else in mind. Something strange. "Pop Qwiz." Perhaps the first and only popcorn marketed exclusively towards children. Thrown under General Mills' "Pop Secret" banner, Pop Qwiz really broke the mold. Junk food with a gimmick is common nowadays, but this stuff was pretty unique in 1991. Basically, it was just regular, buttered popcorn dyed in every color of the rainbow. You had bags of red popcorn, blue popcorn, green, yellow, you name it. That alone was sure to bring in a substantial clientele -- kids'll eat anything that looks odd. Pop Qwiz had more to offer than weird colors, though. While each of the mini-sized bags had correspondently bright colors, the colors of the bags didn't necessarily match the shade of the popcorn within. What was surely just a cost cutting measure was sold to us as a "game" -- it was up to us to guess which popcorn color was in each bag. The point of the game is up for debate, as we got to eat all of the popcorn even if we guessed wrong. Taking things even further, the bags had all sorts of quizzes, puzzles, and other stupid games printed right on 'em. Children always appreciate things tailored specifically for them, and while popcorn wasn't an important victory, we took it with great pride. We had our own popcorn. Tomorrow, the world. You'd have to imagine that some kids would've begged for Pop Qwiz just by passing the colorful box in grocery stores, but the point was really driven home with General Mills' ad campaign. This was crucial for ten trillion reasons, and I swear, I've counted. Okay, how often do you see popcorn advertised during children's programming hours? It's pretty rare, so Pop Qwiz was playing to an audience its competitors never even thought to tackle. Another point: when a kid wants popcorn, words are rarely minced. "I want popcorn." That's all that's ever said. No specific brands are mentioned, no bias towards one particular popcorn is conveyed. Just a simple "I want popcorn." By throwing the "Pop Qwiz" title in our heads, General Mills created a sense of inadvertent brand loyalty. If we wanted popcorn, we asked for popcorn. If we wanted crazy wacky colored popcorn, we asked for Pop Qwiz. And what kid wouldn't always prefer crazy wacky colored popcorn? This was all much more brilliant than it seemed on the surface, and the commercial was a real keeper to boot. I know I focus more on earlier years with these articles, but as I was entering my ugly, lonely teen years during the 90s, I ended up watching a whole lot more television. Alone. This "Pop Qwiz" ad, to me, is just as synonymous with the time as any of the big ones, including that PSA where the Ninja Turtles exposed the dangers of marajuana. It surprises me that the snacks weren't very successful -- I guess the world just wasn't ready to accept, much less eat radioactive green popcorn. Artists are so often unappreciated in own their time, even if they only work in kernels.
Tags: Pop  Qwiz  Popcorn  1990 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 2503
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Posted By: masonx31
Ron Luciano - Umpire Ron Luciano was perhaps the most colorful umpire in Major League Baseball history during his tenure as an American League ump from 1969 to 1980. He was best known for two things: his flamboyant, attention-grabbing way of calling baserunners out by 'shooting' them with his index finger and thumb; and his neverending feud with Baltimore Orioles' manager Earl Weaver. Luciano frequently ran afoul of standard practices by applauding great plays and chatting with players during lulls in the action. Despite his showboating ways, Luciano was generally regarding as an excellent arbiter by those who played the game. After his retirement from umpiring, Luciano wrote five successful books on his experiences as an ump and worked for two seasons as Merle Harmon's broadcast partner on NBC's secondary Game of the Week telecasts. It came as a great surprise to many baseball fans when the seemingly happy-go-lucky Luciano, suffering from depression, took his own life in 1995 at the age of 57.
Tags: Ron  Luciano  umpire  baseball 
Added: 6th November 2013
Views: 1330
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dymo Label Makers Anyone remember this gadget? The Dymo Label Maker was quite popular for a while in the 1970s. A version of it had actually been around for years, but only for industrial use. Once the product became easily accessible and small enough to be held in one's hand did it become well known. Apparently you can still buy the colorful label rolls if you look hard enough for them.
Tags: Dymo  label  maker 
Added: 9th February 2015
Views: 923
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Posted By: Lava1964

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