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Bob Denver on Password The password is 'SKIPPER.' What a coincidence, huh?
Tags: Bob  Denver  Password 
Added: 28th March 2009
Views: 2076
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
D-Day Crossword Puzzle Security Breach In the spring of 1944 the Allies were poised to land in German-occupied France. The only uncertainty was where and when. Tight security over the enormous operation was paramount. (One American general was demoted and sent back to the Unites States for merely speculating on an invasion date at a social gathering.) Accordingly, British Intelligence was aghast when several key code names linked to the D-Day invasion began appearing as answers in the Daily Telegraph crossword puzzles in the month before the June 6 invasion. The code names of all five beaches (Gold, Sword, Juno, Omaha, Utah), the portable harbors (Mulberry), the naval support (Neptune), and the entire operation (Overlord) appeared! Agents questioned Leonard Dawe, a 54-year-old local schoolmaster, who had submitted the puzzles. Dawe didn't know what the fuss was about. He told the agents the words simply fit the puzzles. For years the incident was regarded as a remarkable coincidence. However, in 1984, one of Dawe's former students at the Strand School shed more light on the subject. Ronald French, who was 14 in 1944, said Dawe routinely had his students fill in crossword grids as a mental exercise. Dawe kept the especially good grids, wrote accompanying clues, and submitted them to the Daily Telegraph. The boys often socialized with the Allied troops stationed nearby and likely acquired the words by overhearing their conversations. There is no evidence that Dawe was a German agent, nor is there any evidence that the Germans benefitted from this odd security breach.
Tags: crossword  puzzle  D-Day  WWII  security 
Added: 25th November 2009
Views: 4456
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Ray Combs The original ABC version of Family Feud was hosted by Richard Dawson from 1976 through 1985. Three years later the game show returned to the air on CBS (and then syndication) with Ray Combs as its host. Combs was originally a comedian who was successful as a warm-up act for studio audiences at TV tapings. His favorable reputation once got him a stand-up gig on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. When Family Feud was resurrected, Combs was inevitably compared to Richard Dawson--usually unfavorably. When Mark Goodson, Family Feud's creator, died in 1993, his son took control of the show. With ratings noticeably falling, it was announced that Combs would be replaced by old favorite Richard Dawson in 1994. At the end of the final Family Feud that Combs hosted, he left the stage immediately after he said goodbye--instead of mingling with the competing families, as was the custom. Combs never recovered from losing the show. A car accident caused a spinal injury that put him in constant pain. The comedy clubs he owned closed; he suffered major financial losses and lost his home. His wife of 18 years left him. Displying suicidal tendencies, Combs was hospitalized shortly after his 40th birthday. Not long after his release, police were called to Combs' home which he was violently trashing. He was taken to a mental institution. A short time later Combs committed suicide by hanging himself with his bed linen. In a weird coincidence, Richard Dawson died 16 years to the day that Ray Combs did.
Tags: Ray  Combs  suicide  game  show  host 
Added: 24th July 2010
Views: 6993
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
West Side Baptist Church Explosion This is one of the great collection of coincidences of all time--or is it something else? You decide. At 7:27 p.m. on Wednesday, March 1, 1950 in Beatrice, Nebraska, the West Side Baptist Church was reduced to smithereens when its gas furnace exploded. The explosion should have resulted in serious injury and/or fatalities to the 15 members of the church choir who normally met at 7:25 p.m. on Wednesdays for practice. However, by a fortuitous series of coincidences, no one was in the building when it exploded because every one of the 15 choir members was uncharacteristically late for one reason or another: The pastor (who actually lit the furnace but had returned home), his wife and daughter were late, as the daughter's dress was soiled and the wife was ironing another. A high-school sophomore was late due to difficulty with her geometry homework. Two sisters were late because their car would not start--and their alternate ride was the member with the geometry problem. Another member and her daughter were late as she had to attend to matters at her mother's house before arriving. Yet another member was delayed while writing an important letter. One member waited until the last possible minute before leaving due to the cold weather. Another member was taking care of his two young sons and did not realize until the last minute he was late. The pianist had planned to arrive 30 minutes early but fell asleep after dinner, which caused her and her mother (the choir's director) to be late. Two high-school students were late because one wanted to hear the end of a radio program; the other waited for her as they customarily went to practice together. Makes you think, doesn't it?
Tags: church  explosion  choir  saved  coincidence 
Added: 5th October 2010
Views: 4212
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Ayds Diet Candies Ayds was a brand name of boxed candies that were used as appetite suppressants for dieters starting in 1937. They were available in several flavors. Eating an Ayds candy was supposed to eliminate one's craving for a calorie-rich dessert. Ayds hit their peak of popularity in the late 1970s and had strong sales until the early 1980s. Then, unfortunately, the candies suffered the misfortune of having a name that sounded exactly like the disease AIDS. (This coincidence made some of the advertising pitches from the 1970s sound really bad: "Why go on a diet when you can have Ayds?") By the mid-1980s, sales of Ayds had dropped by 50% from their heyday just a few years earlier. The product's name was changed to Diet Ayds in 1987, but trying to persuade the public that Ayds had no connection to AIDS proved to be an uphill battle. By the end of the 1980s, the candies were discontinued.
Tags: Ayds  diet  candies  name   
Added: 30th September 2011
Views: 3963
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Richie Cunningham - NFL Placekicker It can be an unfortunate or amusing coincidence when someone, quite by chance, has the same name of a celebrity or a fictitious character. Such was the case of of Richie Cunningham, an NFL placekicker who shared the name of Ron Howard's character from the TV sitcom Happy Days. The football-playing Cunningham was born in Houma, LA in 1970--four years before Happy Days hit the airwaves. He attended the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and did most of the kicking for the school's football team. Undrafted, he was signed by the Dallas Cowboys in 1994, but released. He was back with the Cowboys by 1997 where he enjoyed an outstanding rookie campaign. In 1998 he kicked 34 field goals to set a Dallas team record. On occasion, a snippet of the Happy Days theme would be played over the public-address system after Cunningham successfully booted a three-pointer. ESPN's Chris Berman, in doing the NFL highlight package, liked to say "Cunningham Potsied the ball through the uprights!" However, being an NFL kicker is a tenuous existence. Partway through the 1999 NFL season, Cowboys released Cunningham when his accuracy on field goals was just over 50 percent. By 2002 he was out of football altogether after stops in Carolina, Cincinnati, Jacksonville and Green Bay.
Tags: NFL  Richie  Cunningham  shared  name 
Added: 18th August 2015
Views: 1568
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Chris Carmichael After I Love Lucy and the Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour ended in 1960, Lucille Ball took a two-year hiatus from television before returning in The Lucy Show in October 1962. This sitcom--loosely based on the book Life Without George--had Ball playing Lucy Carmichael, the widowed mother of two children who shared a large home in fictitious Danfield, NY with divorced friend Vivan Bagley (Vivian Vance). Bagley had a young son as well, named Sherman. Lucy's late husband had left her a significant trust fund on which to live. However, her banker kept tight control of the estate. Lucy's attractive teenage daughter, Chris, was played by Candy Moore. (Moore's first noteworthy TV appearance came in a 1961 episode of Leave It To Beaver where she played Margie Manners, the pretty daughter of the Cleavers' occasional housekeeper. The plot had Wally smitten with her.) The first Lucy Show episode focused on Lucy badly coping with Chris going on a date with a boy who owns a car. Despite living in the same home as Lucy, Chris appeared in just 39 of the 84 episodes in the sitcom's first three seasons. She only appeared in seven of the 26 episodes in the third season. Nevertheless, Moore was often featured in teen magazines. The Lucy Show was an enormous hit, finishing fourth in the year-end Nielsen ratings in its first season. After the first two seasons, however, Vivian Vance tired of commuting from her home on the east coast to California to do the show. When it became apparent that Vance was going to quit the show after the third season, the entire premise of the sitcom changed. Beginning in the fourth season, Lucy relocated to Los Angeles to be near where Chris was attending college. Also relocating to LA was banker Theodore J. Mooney (Gale Gordon) who, by a remarkable coincidence, had accepted a position at Lucy's new bank. The trust fund was only mentioned in the first episode of Season #4 and Lucy became a secretary at her bank. It was explained that Vivian had remarried and remained in Danfield. Chris was never seen again. (Lucy's son, Jerry, appeared in just two episodes of Season #4 and was written out of the show before Season #5. The plot had Jerry enrolling in a military school.) It was later revealed that CBS wanted to retain Candy Moore on the revised show because of her popularity with young viewers, but Lucy was adamantly opposed. In fact, Lucy threatened to retire over the issue. Moore appeared in nine episodes of the Donna Reed Show and then acted only sporadically thereafter. She did have a small role in Raging Bull in 1980, but Moore's last acting credit came in 1981. According to various sources, Moore, who turned 71 in 2018, became an English teacher at a dramatic school in Los Angeles.
Tags: Candy  Moore  Chris  Carmichael  Lucy  Show 
Added: 7th January 2018
Views: 1333
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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