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End of Western Union Telegrams 2006 On January 27, 2006, Western Union ended more than 150 years of telegram service. Beginning in 1854, the company began transmitting and transcribing telegraphed messages and delivering them to customers across the country. They heyday of the telegram was in the 1920s and 1930s when sending a message by telegraph was cheaper than making a long-distance telephone call. The word 'stop' was commonly used in the text of telegrams to end a sentence instead of a period because it was cheaper to send a four-letter word than a punctuation mark. Telegrams were often used for formal notifications and announcements, such as the one below to inform the recipient that he would share the 1958 Nobel Prize for Medicine/Physiology. During the Second World War, Western Union couriers were feared because they delivered official death notices to the families of servicemen. Eventually technology made telegrams obsolete and anachronistic. Only about 20,000 telegrams were sent in 2005, mostly by companies that were required to send legal notifications. On that final day of service, ten telegrams were delivered. They included a congratulatory message, a sympathy message, and, of course, a handful of messages from people who were trying to make history by sending the final Western Union telegram. Today Western Union exists only as a company that handles money transfers.
Tags: last  telegram  Western  Union  communications 
Added: 9th March 2010
Views: 3720
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Posted By: Lava1964
1903 World Series Scorecard In days gone by, all serious baseball fans used to manually keep a batter-by-batter record of ballgames on scorecards. (Some of us still do, although the custom appears to be dying out.) For the first modern World Series in 1903, the Third Base Saloon in Boston sold their own version to fans heading to the Huntington Avenue Base Ball Grounds to watch the American League champion Boston Pilgrims battle the National League champion Pittsburgh Pirates. Although the 10-cent price of this scorecard seems ridiculously cheap by today's standards, it was double the cost of what scorecards normally sold for at the ballpark during the regular season. However, it was five cents cheaper than the 15-cent pricetag the Pilgrims had affixed to the World Series scorecards sold by their vendors. The Boston Globe editorialized the hometown club was 'squeezing the dear public.'
Tags: World  Series  1903  scorecard 
Added: 30th October 2010
Views: 1475
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hot L Baltimore - Sitcom Flop 1975 ABC had high hopes when its risque and controversial sitcom Hot L Baltimore debuted in 1975. Ultimately, though, the show never captured the hearts of TV viewers and was summarily axed less than five months into its run. The show, based on a successful off-Broadway play, took place in the rundown Hotel Baltimore in Baltimore, MD. It drew its title from the cheap establishment's neon marquee, which had a burned-out letter "e" that had never been replaced. The half-hour series premiered on January 24, 1975 and was produced by Norman Lear for ABC. (It was, in fact, the first Lear property to air on ABC.) The cast included Conchata Ferrell, James Cromwell, Richard Masur, Al Freeman, Jr., Gloria LeRoy, Jeannie Linero, and Charlotte Rae. The show's plots focused on the lives of the odd assemblage of disparate characters who called the seedy hotel home. The series had several controversial elements, including two primary characters who were prostitutes--one of whom was an illegal immigrant--and one of the first gay couples to be depicted on an American television series. Because of its storylines, Hot L Baltimore was the first network television show to have a warning during its opening, cautioning viewers about mature themes. ABC gave Hot L Baltimore a full publicity campaign, but it failed to win an audience and was canceled after just 13 episodes; its last telecast was June 6, 1975. This series is notable as the first failure for producer Norman Lear after a very successful streak of mega-hit TV series beginning with All in the Family in 1971 and continuing with Sanford and Son, Maude, Good Times, and The Jeffersons, among others.
Tags: Hot  L  Baltimore  sitcom  flop  Norman  Lear  ABC 
Added: 29th August 2011
Views: 3675
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Posted By: Lava1964
 Home Alone Commercial by on VHS December 1991 $29.98?!?! For a VHS tape? Wow...yup..DVD, were about that when they came out? so I guess in relations its the same...but a rip off considering DVDs use less plastic and easier and cheaper to mass produce with movies on them.. Recorded December 1991
Tags:   Home  Alone  Commercial  by  on  VHS  December  1991 
Added: 17th August 2012
Views: 1019
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Posted By: masonx31
Kid Cuisine Mega Meal 1990s Honestly, I can't remember having these, maybe once if it was on sale; parents were cheap. Were these actually any good? Today they still have them, the other week I thought about buying 1 to try, but I passed. I don't think they are doing to well anyway since they don't really advertise from what I see. Kid Cuisine is a brand of packaged frozen dinners targeted for children's appetites, marketed by ConAgra Foods, Inc., created in 1990.
Tags: Kid  Cuisine  Mega  Meal    1990s 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1758
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Posted By: masonx31
Farleys Teenage Muntant Ninja Turtles Snacks 1990 Farley's Teenage Muntant Ninja Turtles Snacks 1990-1997? The Turtles were all over the place in the early ’90s. You couldn’t walk into a Kay Bee toy store or supermarket without seeing their faces and logo plastered all over some type of product. As far as food tie-ins go, other than Pizza-Crunchabungas and TMNT cereal, Farley’s TMNT fruit snacks were a high point in the merchandising blitz that controlled my young life. Farley’s was always produced a low budget line of fruit snacks. You could just tell from packaging and flavor and texture that they weren’t the best brand around. Farley’s was the type of fruit snacks where you’d see a whole palette of them in the middle of the sales floor at the Dollar Tree (no doubt right alongside whatever licensed cereal Ralston was pumping out that month). They couldn’t compete with Sunkist or Betty Crocker but cheap fruit snacks are still very good in my opinion because you can never really go wrong with fruit snacks in the first place. One of the great things about fruit snacks is that they double as toys if you’re creative enough. Who else had the Turtles battle Shredder and his henchman before playing the part of a giant and gobbling them all up? I think Leatherhead was my favorite to eat just because I like Leatherhead and I think he’s a criminally unappreciated part of the Turtles universe. I was disappointed there was no Rat King though.
Tags: Farleys  Teenage  Muntant  Ninja  Turtles  Snacks  1990s 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 2223
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Posted By: masonx31
The Liberator The Liberator was very cheap to manufacture and easy to mass-produce gun that could be dropped in large quantities over Europe to arm the resistance forces. Manufactured by the Guide Lamp Division of General Motors they cost $2.40 to make, about $30 2010 money. The weapons were not mass-dropped over Europe. More of these were dropped into China and the Philippines during World War II
Tags: The  Liberator  gun  resistance  forces    Guide  Lamp  Division  weapons  cheap  weapons  Europe  China  Philippines  World  War  II     
Added: 30th August 2012
Views: 4290
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Posted By: pfc
Postmortem Photography It seems a little bit creepy today--well, actually it seems extremely creepy by modern standards--but it was quite common in the late 19th century to photograph your loved ones in lifelike poses after they had died! Photography was generally very expensive in the 19th century. Often families had no photographs of loved ones while they were alive. Accordingly, as part of a funeral ritual, the recently deceased person would be dressed, posed in a very lifelike position--much like the gentleman in this example--and his/her image was preserved for posterity. Frequently they were posed alongside siblings and parents as part of a family portrait. Because of the slow shutter speed of cameras in those days, dead people were actually the best subjects for photographers as they were guaranteed to stay still. Postmortem photography was surprisingly commonplace in Europe and North America (especially of dead children because childhood mortality rates were very high). It remained quite common until photography became cheaper and families were more likely to have photos of their relatives taken while they were still in the land of the living.
Tags: postmortem  photography 
Added: 9th March 2015
Views: 1250
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Posted By: Lava1964
ATT Call Collect with Carrot Top Hockey Tags: ATT  Call  Collect  with  Carrot  Top  Hockey  telephone  phone  collect  call  cheap  cheapskate  comedy  commercial  2002  2000's  00's 
Added: 13th December 2015
Views: 1460
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Posted By: Cliffy

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