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Stockwell Day-Doris Day Petition One of Canada's most popular homegrown TV shows is a CBC comedy program called This Hour Has 22 Minutes. One of the show's most fondly remembered moments was the "Stockwell Day Petition." The sketch aired during the 2000 Canadian federal election campaign, and consisted of a staged rant by host Rick Mercer. During that particular federal election, Stockwell Day, who was then the leader of the Canadian Alliance Party, proposed a mechanism to call for a referendum. Day proposed that a petition on ANY subject which gathered at least 350,000 signatures from voting-age citizens (about 3% of Canada's eligible voters) would automatically trigger a national referendum. Mercer decided to put Day's poorly thought out idea to the test: His "rant" asked viewers to log on to the show's website and sign an online petition demanding the Alliance Party leader change his first name to Doris--thus making him Doris Day. The show's producers claimed to have obtained in excess of 1.2 million online signatures--although there was no way of telling how many of those who signed the online petition were actually eligible voters. The stunt got huge publicity in Canada and even made some international news programs. The petition had no effect on Alliance Party policy, though, despite clearly demonstrating how absurd Day's proposal was. Day did, however, take the petition in stride. When asked about it by a reporter, Day gave a very appropriate response: "Que será, será!"
Tags: Canada  CBC  Stockwell  Day  petition 
Added: 20th June 2012
Views: 3554
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Spittoons They'd be considered very unhygienic today, but in their day spittoons were actually a step up in public health. Used as a receptacle for spit generated by chewing tobacco, in the late 19th century spittoons became a common sight in pubs, brothels, saloons, hotels, stores, banks, railway carriages, and other places where people--especially adult men--gathered. Although brass was the most common material for spitoons, other materials ranged from basic functional iron to crafted cut glass and fine porcelain. At higher-class hotels, spittoons were often elaborately decorated. Spittoons were flat-bottomed, often weighted to minimize tipping over, and commonly had an interior lip to make spilling less likely even if they did tip over. Occasionally they'd have lids. Some had holes with an accompanying plug, to aid in draining and cleaning. Use of spittoons was considered an advance of public manners and health, intended to replace previously common habit of spitting on floors, streets, and sidewalks. Many jurisdictions passed laws against spitting in public--other than into a spittoon. Boy Scout troops organized campaigns to paint "Do not Spit on the Sidewalk" notices on city sidewalks. In 1909, Cincinnati scout troops allied with members of the Anti-Tuberculosis League painted thousands of such messages in a single night. A punny mass-produced sign common in saloons read: 'If you expect to rate as a gentleman, do not expectorate on the floor.' Spittoons were also useful for people suffering from tuberculosis who would cough up phlegm. Public spittoons would sometimes contain a solution of an antiseptic such as carbolic acid with the aim of limiting transmission of disease. With the start of the 20th century, medical doctors urged tuberculosis sufferers to use personal pocket spittoons instead of public ones; these were jars with tight lids which people could carry. After the deadly 1918 flu epidemic, both hygiene and etiquette advocates began to disparage public use of the spittoon, and use began to decline. Chewing gum replaced tobacco as the favorite chew of the younger generation. Cigarettes were considered more hygienic than spit-inducing chewing tobacco. While it was still not unusual to see spittoons in some public places as late as the 1930s, vast numbers of old brass spittoons met their ends when they were melted down during the scrap metal drives of the Second World War.
Tags: spittoons  hygiene  tobacco 
Added: 17th July 2012
Views: 4113
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Posted By: Lava1964
What Would You Do and Double Dare 90s host  Marc Summers says half his face was wiped out in a car accident. Week of August 5, 2012 in Philadelphia, Marc Summers: Car Accident 'Wiped Out' Half My Face Marc Summers is grateful to be alive after sustaining serious facial injuries during a car accident last week. The 60-year-old star, who currently hosts The Food Network's "Unwrapped," was a passenger in a taxi cab in Philadelphia when the vehicle hydroplaned during a "torrential downpour," Summers told People. PLAY IT NOW: Billy Bush Reveals Details Of His Bicycling Accident & Complicated Recovery "I knew when [the driver] lost control that I was in trouble. I was on the phone with my supervising producer and I said, 'Oh my God, we're going to crash!'" he told the mag, recalling the harrowing moments right before the wreck. "Next thing I knew, I woke up and had blood all over me." Summers' head slammed against the plastic partition between the cab's front and backseats upon impact, badly damaging his face. VIEW THE PHOTOS: We Like What They’re Cooking: Stars Of The Food Network! "Everything on the left side from my eye socket down was just wiped out," he told the mag. "My eye socket got all swollen. I'm having trouble seeing completely out of the left eye... There's lots of titanium and screws in my face." Adding, "I was pretty lucky that I didn't have brain damage." Summers, a longtime TV producer and former host of Nickelodeon's "Double Dare," underwent a four-hour operation at the hand of a plastic surgeon following the accident. VIEW THE PHOTOS: Celebrity Chefs & Foodies While the star is still in tremendous pain, he said his doctor is confident the lengthy operation was successful. "Everything went back into place," he told the mag. "In a few weeks, the swelling will go down and no one will ever know ... I'll be a new guy." VIEW THE PHOTOS: Slime Time! 2012 Nickelodeon’s Kids’ Choice Awards Though he faces an arduous recuperation and is still having difficulty chewing solid foods, Summers is already on a mission to prevent this type of accident from happening to anyone else. "Appreciate all the good wishes from everyone. Pain a little less each day. Will you help me in a campaign to rid cabs of plastic partitions?" he Tweeted on Saturday, later adding that the blockades "serve no purpose other than hurting people" and are "way [too] close to backseat despite seat belts." -- Erin O'Sullivan Copyright 2012 by NBC Universal, Inc. All rights reserved.
Tags: What  Would  You  Do  and  Double  Dare  90s  host    Marc  Summers  says  half  his  face  was  wiped  out  in  a  car  accident. 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1864
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Pop Qwiz Popcorn 1990 1990s Colors included yellow, blue, green, and a mystery bag with a surprise color. I'm not sure how many of you will remember this stuff, but it was just too weird not to mention. Video store chains became especially popular during the early 90s; a fact proven by the insidious amount of Blockbuster commercials strewn into TV breaks at the time. As more and more movie nights were staged from home, popcorn finally shed its "theater treat" stigma for good while sales soared. Those microwaveable bags of kernels became and remain a staple in most households, with several companies competing for the coveted top spot. Yes, there's competition in popcorn. So how do you make one popcorn more attractive than the other? For the most part, it's all the same shit. Covering the packaging with pretty colors and in-your-face fonts only took these companies so far, and while dubious additions like cheddar dust and Cajun red spice helped differentiate the products, General Mills had something else in mind. Something strange. "Pop Qwiz." Perhaps the first and only popcorn marketed exclusively towards children. Thrown under General Mills' "Pop Secret" banner, Pop Qwiz really broke the mold. Junk food with a gimmick is common nowadays, but this stuff was pretty unique in 1991. Basically, it was just regular, buttered popcorn dyed in every color of the rainbow. You had bags of red popcorn, blue popcorn, green, yellow, you name it. That alone was sure to bring in a substantial clientele -- kids'll eat anything that looks odd. Pop Qwiz had more to offer than weird colors, though. While each of the mini-sized bags had correspondently bright colors, the colors of the bags didn't necessarily match the shade of the popcorn within. What was surely just a cost cutting measure was sold to us as a "game" -- it was up to us to guess which popcorn color was in each bag. The point of the game is up for debate, as we got to eat all of the popcorn even if we guessed wrong. Taking things even further, the bags had all sorts of quizzes, puzzles, and other stupid games printed right on 'em. Children always appreciate things tailored specifically for them, and while popcorn wasn't an important victory, we took it with great pride. We had our own popcorn. Tomorrow, the world. You'd have to imagine that some kids would've begged for Pop Qwiz just by passing the colorful box in grocery stores, but the point was really driven home with General Mills' ad campaign. This was crucial for ten trillion reasons, and I swear, I've counted. Okay, how often do you see popcorn advertised during children's programming hours? It's pretty rare, so Pop Qwiz was playing to an audience its competitors never even thought to tackle. Another point: when a kid wants popcorn, words are rarely minced. "I want popcorn." That's all that's ever said. No specific brands are mentioned, no bias towards one particular popcorn is conveyed. Just a simple "I want popcorn." By throwing the "Pop Qwiz" title in our heads, General Mills created a sense of inadvertent brand loyalty. If we wanted popcorn, we asked for popcorn. If we wanted crazy wacky colored popcorn, we asked for Pop Qwiz. And what kid wouldn't always prefer crazy wacky colored popcorn? This was all much more brilliant than it seemed on the surface, and the commercial was a real keeper to boot. I know I focus more on earlier years with these articles, but as I was entering my ugly, lonely teen years during the 90s, I ended up watching a whole lot more television. Alone. This "Pop Qwiz" ad, to me, is just as synonymous with the time as any of the big ones, including that PSA where the Ninja Turtles exposed the dangers of marajuana. It surprises me that the snacks weren't very successful -- I guess the world just wasn't ready to accept, much less eat radioactive green popcorn. Artists are so often unappreciated in own their time, even if they only work in kernels.
Tags: Pop  Qwiz  Popcorn  1990 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 2548
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Surge The Drink Commercial 1997 My guess due to not selling enough, they stopped production?.. Crazy right? I know.. great stuff.. I'd drink this over Mountain Dew since it came out. As a Kid I grabbed for this in the fridge first! after School 1996 In 1996, Coca-Cola started production on Surge, a variation of the Norwegian soft drink named Urge. Surge was produced and marketed in the United States, with its original whitepaper name being "MDK," or "Mountain Dew Killer."[1] Surge's release was accompanied by a vast nationwide marketing campaign that led to initially high sales and popularity. A few years after the release, sales began to slip, and as a result the Coca-Cola company ceased production of Surge in can and bottle form in 2002. They proceeded to discontinue Surge fountain syrup in 2003. Save Surge: After the discontinuation of Surge in cans, a community was formed by web designer Eric "Karks" Karkovach entitled "SAVE SURGE." The movement initially mapped the locations at which Surge could be purchased in fountain form. Upon cancellation of the fountain syrup, the community continued, adopting an approach of activism. Members would create "recipes" meant to mimic the look and taste of Surge, sign and distribute petitions, protest at their local bottling plants, and otherwise pressure Coca-Cola to bring back their favorite beverage. They got a response in 2005 when Vault was brought to market, and while Coca-Cola has yet to confirm the similarity in taste and appearance, the members of the movement took the inception of Vault as the fruit of their labors. Its really simple. Surge Movement Upon the discontinuation of Vault in December 2011, the "SURGE MOVEMENT" formed on Facebook as an activist group to lobby Coca-Cola for the soft drink's return. Sharing the same goal as its predecessor, the group seeks to have Surge produced once more, as a result of Vault's discontinuation. The group repetitively posts requests on Coca-Cola's Facebook page, and encourages its members to call Coca-Cola's feedback hotline to voice their desires further. The Movement initially has gained over 9,000 Facebook "likes" in the months after it was started and continues to grow. The members plan on continuing to flood the walls of Coca-Cola and its subsidiaries until they receive an official statement from the company. Bring it back?...YES.. why not Most likely it will be a hit due to the fact its been gone for some time..One last thing, yes the Original design can was the best.. it wasn't made with straight edges like the 2nd edition.. it was meant to be different with the bubble style lettering!
Tags: Surge  The  Drink  Commercial  1997 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1851
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Bubble Tape  6 Feet of Bubble Gum Commercial 1991 It belongs here in the 90's section do to its Popularity in the 90's for Kids. Bubble Tape is a brand of bubble gum produced by Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company, introduced in the late 1980s[1][2]. It experienced its greatest popularity in the early 1990s due to its unique packaging and direct marketing to preteen children ("it's six feet of bubble gum for you, not them"—"them" referring to parents or just adults in general). Today, it is still a common find in most supermarkets, although advertising campaigns for it have subsided significantly. Bubble Tape comes in a small, round, plastic container similar in size to a hockey puck. This contains six feet (1.8 m) of gum wrapped in a spiral. The container functions much like a tape dispenser, although the top half can be removed.
Tags: Bubble  Tape    6  Feet  of  Bubble  Gum  Commercial  1991   
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1741
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Posted By: masonx31
Sexist Advertisment Tags: Sexist  Advertisment  Ironing  Board  Measure  Your  Wife  Ad  Campaign 
Added: 15th November 2012
Views: 12394
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Posted By: pfc
Archie Bunker for Prez T-Shirts During the 1972 presidential campaign "Archie Bunker For President" t-shirts got a few laughs. America's favorite bigot didn't win the election, of course, but his man "Richard E. Nixon" (that's what Archie called him) did!
Tags: Archie  Bunker  t-shirts 
Added: 4th February 2013
Views: 3602
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Posted By: Lava1964
1964 Barry Goldwater Campaign Ad Here is one of Barry Goldwater's 1964 campaign ads in his unsuccessful bid for the U.S. presidency.
Tags: GOP  Barry  Goldwater  politics  1964 
Added: 3rd January 2013
Views: 1424
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
William McKinley Re-Election Poster This attractive poster was used in William McKinley's campaign to have him re-elected as President in 1900.
Tags: William  McKinley  campaign  poster 
Added: 19th June 2013
Views: 1077
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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