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Whats My Line - Syndicated Years After a prime time run on CBS of more than 17 years (1950 to 1967), the popular panel show What's My Line? was resurrected by its creators as a syndicated program from 1968 to 1975. Beloved host John Daly was not interested in the hectic schedule of five shows per week (all done in one day), so Washington political reporter Wally Bruner was brought in as the new moderator. Classy Arlene Francis returned as a regular panelist. Bennett Cerf apppeared occasionally until his death in 1971. Soupy Sales became the regular male panelist. He proved to be an amusing and excellent game player who seemed to know every mystery guest no matter what field he/she happened to be in. The syndicated version was less refined than the CBS version. Games were deliberately shortened to allow the contestants to display their unusual occupations--something that almost never happened on the old version. Therefore if a contestant was a fire eater or a wine taster, there was invariably a demonstration of his/her talent. Bruner hosted WML for four years but admittedly was not fond of New York City nor the showbiz scene and was happy to bow out gracefully. Larry Blyden, best known as a Broadway actor, took over as moderator in 1972 for the show's last three seasons, and was much more comfortable hobnobbing with celebrities than Bruner was. Providing halfway decent mystery guests five shows per week proved to be a huge challenge. Executive producer Gil Fates charitably referred to some of the so-called celebrities as "owls" because often the studio audience and some of the panelists would quietly say "who?" when the mystery guest was not particularly famous. The final shows were taped just before Christmas in 1974 and aired throughout the spring of 1975. Towards the end, declining ratings and aging audience demographics made WML a tough sell to local TV stations. Blyden was slated to host Showoffs, another game show, when he was tragically killed in an auto accident while vacationing in Morocco in June 1975--which absolutely sealed the finish of WML. The syndicated WML simply faded away with none of the sentimental fanfare the CBS version had in its 1967 finale. In his book on the history of WML, Fates ruefully admits the last episode of the syndicated show was "a bomb." There have been no serious attempts to revive WML since 1975, although a retrospective program was made later that year--co-hosted by John Daly and Arlene Francis--to mark WML's 25 years on the air.
Tags: TV  syndicated  Whats  My  Line 
Added: 14th June 2012
Views: 2023
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Posted By: Lava1964
White Christmas Trailer Tags: White  Christmas    Bing  Crosby  Danny  Kaye    Rosemary  Clooney  Vera-Ellen  VistaVision    Michael  Curtiz 
Added: 21st December 2013
Views: 1492
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Posted By: Music Maiden
1913 Advice for Husbands and Wives Two helpul advice books for British married couples, Don'ts For Wives and Don'ts For Husbands, published in 1913, are experiencing a renaissance in sales today. Here are some of the timeless pointers contained on their pages: FOR HUSBANDS: DON'T try to "drive" your wife. You will be much more successful if you "lead" her. DONíT scoff if your wife wants to drive the car. DONíT keep up the ďpoor little womanĒ pose too long. A woman may like to be a plaything for a little while but the novelty soon wears off. DONíT rush out of the house in such a hurry that you havenít time to kiss your wife goodbye. She will grieve over the omission all day. DONíT dwell on the beauty of other women if you know your wife to be sensitive on the point. There is no sense in rubbing sores, although some men seem to find a strange pleasure in it. DONíT spend night after night at your club, leaving your wife alone to count the hours until your return. DONíT forget to buy your wife a pair of gloves occasionally. She will always be pleased to have them. FOR WIVES: DONíT think your husband not ďmanlyĒ because he happens to be short and thin and not very strong. Manliness is not a pure physical quality. DONíT moralize by way of winning back the love that seems to be waning. Make yourself extra charming and arrange delicious dinners which include all your husbandís favorite dishes. DONíT expect your husband to be an angel. You would get very tired of him if he were. DONíT try to dictate to your husband on any subject. He wonít stand for it and there will be trouble. DONíT nauseate your husband with talking ďbabyĒ all the time. As babyís father, he will stand a good deal of it, but remember there are other interests in the world. DONíT be jealous of your husbandís bachelor friends. Let him camp out with them for an occasional weekend if he wants to. He will come back all the fresher and full of appreciation for his home. DONíT say, ďI told you soĒ to your husband, however much you feel tempted to. It does no good and he will be grateful to you for not saying it. DONíT let breakfast be a ďsnatchĒ meal. Your husband often does the best part of his dayís work on it and the engine canít work if you donít stoke it properly.
Tags: marriage  advice  1913 
Added: 2nd January 2013
Views: 3073
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Posted By: Lava1964
Link Wray Rumble 1958 When Link Wray released the thrilling, ominous "Rumble" in 1958, it became one of the only instrumentals ever to be banned from radio play Ė for fear that it might incite gang violence. By stabbing his amplifier's speaker cone with a pencil, Wray created the distorted, overdriven sound that would reverberate through metal, punk and grunge. Wray, who proudly claimed Shawnee Indian ancestry and lost a lung to tuberculosis, was the archetypal leather-clad badass, and his song titles alone Ė "Slinky," "The Black Widow" Ė convey the force and menace of his playing. "He was fucking insane," said the Black Keys' Dan Auerbach. "I would listen to 'Some Kinda Nut,' over and over. It sounded like he was strangling the guitar Ė like it was screaming for help." When Wray died in 2005, Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen both performed "Rumble" onstage in tribute. "If it hadn't been for Link Wray and 'Rumble,'" said Pete Townshend, "I would have never picked up a guitar."
Tags: Link  Wray  Rumble 
Added: 22nd February 2013
Views: 3035
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Posted By: kinkman
Kirby Puckett with David Letterman Kirby Puckett was one of the most popular and talented baseball players of his generation. He played 12 seasons with the Minnesota Twins from 1984 to 1995, leading them to World Series titles in both 1987 and 1991. In what would turn out to be Puckett's final MLB game, he was struck by a pitch by Dennis Martinez that broke his jaw on September 28, 1995. Puckett was hitting well during spring training of 1996, but woke up one morning unable to see out of his right eye. Suffering from glaucoma, Puckett was forced to retire. He became an executive with the Twins. This appearance on David Letterman's program took place in 1997. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. Puckett's final years were marred with accusations of violence, marital infidelity, sexual misconduct, spousal abuse, and other unseemly behavior that resulted in the Twins severing ties with him. Sports Illustrated ran an extremely unflattering cover story by Frank Deford on Puckett in a 2003 issue that chronicled his disturbing "secret life." Wrote Deford, "The media and the fans in Minnesota turned the Twins' Hall of Famer into a paragon of every virtueó-and that made his human flaws, when they came to light, all the more shocking." Puckett died of a cerebral hemorrhage eight days before his 46th birthday in 2006.
Tags: Kirby  Puckett  MLB  baseball  Minnesota  Twins  interview 
Added: 6th December 2013
Views: 1080
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Posted By: Lava1964
Emile Griffith Meets Benny Parets Son This is a sad story: On March 24, 1962, Emile Griffith regained the world welterweight championship by knocking out Benny Paret in the 12th round of their title fight in Madison Square Garden. The fight ended with Paret absorbing numerous brutal shots to the head before referee Ruby Goldstein stopped the contest. Paret lapsed into a coma and died. Forty-three years later Paret's son, Benny Jr., meets Emile Griffith for the first time.
Tags: boxing  Griffith  Paret  tragedy 
Added: 28th May 2013
Views: 1344
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Posted By: Lava1964
National Anthem in Boston - Apr. 17/13 Very powerful: Two days after the bombings at the Boston Marathon, the Boston Bruins hosted the Buffalo Sabres in an NHL game. Rene Rancourt, the Bruins' longtime anthem singer, allowed the fans to carry the tune.
Tags: Rene  Rancourt  Boston  Bruins  anthem 
Added: 30th October 2013
Views: 974
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ron Luciano - Umpire Ron Luciano was perhaps the most colorful umpire in Major League Baseball history during his tenure as an American League ump from 1969 to 1980. He was best known for two things: his flamboyant, attention-grabbing way of calling baserunners out by 'shooting' them with his index finger and thumb; and his neverending feud with Baltimore Orioles' manager Earl Weaver. Luciano frequently ran afoul of standard practices by applauding great plays and chatting with players during lulls in the action. Despite his showboating ways, Luciano was generally regarding as an excellent arbiter by those who played the game. After his retirement from umpiring, Luciano wrote five successful books on his experiences as an ump and worked for two seasons as Merle Harmon's broadcast partner on NBC's secondary Game of the Week telecasts. It came as a great surprise to many baseball fans when the seemingly happy-go-lucky Luciano, suffering from depression, took his own life in 1995 at the age of 57.
Tags: Ron  Luciano  umpire  baseball 
Added: 6th November 2013
Views: 1252
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Posted By: Lava1964
Charley Ross Abduction Case - 1874 The first prominent child abduction in American history was the Charley Ross case. On July 1, 1874, four-year-old Charley Ross was playing with his five-year-old brother Walter in the front yard of their home in the affluent Germantown section of Philadelphia. Two men pulled up in a horse-drawn carriage. They offered the two brothers candy and fireworks if they would take a ride into town with them. The naive youngsters agreed. After a short ride, the carriage stopped in front of a store. Walter was given a quarter to buy fireworks. When he came out of the store, the carriage was gone. A sobbing Walter was found by a policeman. Walter explained what had happened. He described one of the men as having "a monkey nose." Not long afterward, ransom demands were mailed to Charley's father, Christian Ross, from various post offices in and around Philadelphia. The notes demanded the enormous sum of $20,000 for the boy's safe return. Christian was heavily in debt following the 1873 stock market crash and could not afford to play the ransom. The Pinkerton Detective Agency circulated thousands of handbills with an artist's drawing of Charley's face which made the case national news. Attempts to meet with the kidnappers on several occasions failed when the abductors never showed up. There were no significant developments in the case until December 1874 when two career criminals were shot while attempting to burglarize a judge's home in Long Island. One intruder, Bill Mosher, died instantly. The other, Joe Douglas, was mortally wounded. Before he died, Douglas confessed that he and Mosher had kidnapped Charley Ross in July. Contradictory statements were given as to whether the boy was still alive. Walter was taken to Long Island to identify the dead twosome. He agreed they were the men who had taken him for the carriage ride in July. Mosher was easily identified because of his deformed "monkey nose." The Ross family resolutely continued to pursue leads for Charley well into the 1930s. Hundreds of would-be Charley Rosses were investigated. None could be proven as legitimate. It is believed the admonition, "Don't take candy from strangers" was inspired by the Charley Ross kidnapping.
Tags: Charley  Ross  kidnapping  child  abduction 
Added: 17th July 2014
Views: 2160
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Posted By: Lava1964
Brenda Russell - So Good So Right Tags: Brenda  Russell  -  So  Good  So  Right  The  Midnight  Special      Diana  Ross,  Stevie  Wonder,  Aretha  Franklin,  Earth,  Wind  &  Fire,  Joni  Mitchell,  Donna  Summer,  Bingo  Players,  Flo  Rida 
Added: 9th October 2014
Views: 823
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Posted By: Music Maiden

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