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Rick Monday Saves American Flag 1976 At a time when the USA was experiencing a resurgence of patriotism with the Bicentennial, a pair of protesters apparently didn't get the message that the 1960s were over: The Cubs and Dodgers were playing in Los Angeles and with the Dodgers batting in the bottom of the 4th inning, two men ran onto the field, intending to burn an American flag. The men spread the flag on the outfield grass, and one of them soaked it in lighter fluid as the other was about to ignite it. A quick-thinking Rick Monday ran towards the men, grabbing the flag and preventing the desecration of the Stars and Stripes.
Tags: Sports 
Added: 7th December 2014
Views: 1290
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Posted By: WestVirginiaRebel
Wayne Maki-Ted Green Incident On September 21, 1969, the Boston Bruins were playing the St. Louis Blues in an NHL pre-season game in Ottawa. Things got very nasty between Boston's Ted Green and St. Louis' Wayne Maki. This photo shows Maki clubbing Green over the head with his stick. Green dropped to the ice and laid in a grotesque position as if he had been poleaxed--which he basically had been. Green needed three brain operations and a steel plate inserted into his skull to save his life. Maki was suspended for most of the 1969-70 season. Green, to no one's surprise, did not return that season. Nevertheless, after Boston won the Stanley Cup, his Bruin teammates voted him a full share of the team's playoff money. Green's name also was inscribed on the Cup. Green returned the following year and played pro hockey until retiring at age 39 in 1979. He always wore a helmet afterward, a rarity at the time for NHLers. Maki became something of a pariah and was dealt to the expansion Vancouver Canucks before the 1970-71 season. Somewhat ironically, Maki was forced to retire in 1972 after being diagnosed with brain cancer. He died in May 1974 at age 29.
Tags: hockey  violence  NHL  Maki  Green 
Added: 15th April 2011
Views: 10257
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Posted By: Lava1964
Disturbing Saw Ad With this odd ad for Atkins Saws I guess we're supposed to make the connection between saws and beef.
Tags: ad  saws  beef 
Added: 30th May 2011
Views: 2116
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Posted By: Lava1964
1960 World Series Kinescope Found In September 2010, baseball fans were thrilled by a remarkable dicovery: A complete kinescope copy of the seventh game of the 1960 World Series was found in Bing Crosby's wine cellar! How a near pristine black-and-white reel of the entire television broadcast of the deciding game of the 1960 World Series — long believed to be lost forever — came to rest in the wine cellar of Bing Crosby’s home near San Francisco is not a mystery to those who knew him. Crosby loved baseball, but as a part owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates he was too nervous to watch the World Series against the New York Yankees, so he and his wife went to Paris, where they listened by radio. “He said, ‘I can’t stay in the country,’ ” his widow, Kathryn Crosby, recalled. “ ‘I’ll jinx everybody.’ ” He knew he would want to watch the game later — if his Pirates won — so he hired a company to record Game Seven by kinescope, an early relative of the DVR, filming off a television monitor. The five-reel set is the only known complete copy of the game, in which Pirates second baseman Bill Mazeroski famously hit a game-ending home run to beat the Yankees 10-9 at Forbes Field. It is considered one of the greatest and most memorable ballgames ever played. Crosby apparently had more foresight than the television networks and stations, which sadly erased or discarded nearly all the Major League Baseball games they carried until the 1970s. A canny preservationist of all things, Crosby, who died in 1977, kept a half-century’s worth of records, tapes and films in the wine cellar-turned-vault in his Hillsborough, California home. “Bing Crosby was way ahead of his time,” said Nick Trotta, senior library and licensing manager for Major League Baseball Productions, the sport’s archivist. The kinescope was found quite by accident. A producer searching through Crosby's estate for material for a TV documentary on the late singer's career accidentally came upon five film cannisters marked '1960 World Series.' The 50-year-old game was first shown to a private audience in Pittsburgh that included surviving members of both teams. It was broadcast on the MLB Network in December 2010 and has since been made available to the general public on DVD.
Tags: 1960  World  Series  baseball  Bing  Crosby 
Added: 13th August 2011
Views: 2097
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Posted By: Lava1964
You Bet Your Life - Bill Cosby Remake One of the most enduring game shows of all time was the original You Bet Your Life. It was hosted by Groucho Marx first on radio in 1947 and continued well into the television era until 1961. The quiz game was clearly secondary to the superbly ad-libbed interviews Marx had with the contestants. A new version of You Bet Your Life, hosted by Bill Cosby, aired from September 7, 1992 to June 4, 1993 in syndication. Cosby was joined on this show by a female announcer and sidekick, Robbi Chong; she was referred to as "Renfield." Organist Shirley Scott contributed the jazzy theme music. The program was taped in Philadelphia. Three couples competed, each couple playing the game individually. After the couple was introduced, they spent time chatting with Cosby. When the interview was done, the game began. Each couple was staked with $750 and were then asked three questions within a category presented at the start of the game. Before each question, the couple made a wager, which would be added to their winnings if they were correct or subtracted if they were incorrect. The secret word in this version, worth $500, was represented by a blackbird wearing a sweatshirt from Temple University, Cosby's alma mater. The couple with the most money played for an additional $10,000. Although Cosby was renowned for ad-libbing funny exchanges with audience members as part of his stand-up comedy routines, he was no Groucho Marx. (Who, besides Groucho, was?) Low ratings prompted the cancellation of the series after just one season.
Tags: remake  You  Bet  Your  Life  Bill  Cosby  syndicated 
Added: 21st August 2011
Views: 1632
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Buckwheat Hoax 1990 ABC News found itself in an embarrassing position in 1990. Acting on a viewer's tip, 20/20, ABC's weekly news magazine, aired a "Where are they now?" segment about former Our Gang member Buckwheat. The story claimed that Buckwheat, whose real name was Bill English, was modestly employed as a grocery bagger at a Tempe, AZ supermarket. Immediately following the broadcast, dozens of Our Gang fans called ABC to tell the network they had been duped by an imposter. The real Buckwheat was named Billie Thomas--and he had died of a heart attack in 1980. Among the whistle-blowers was Our Gang alumnus Spanky McFarland who had worked alongside Thomas from 1934 until 1942. (Buckwheat stayed with the series until its conclusion in 1944.) Shortly after the hoax was exposed, a reporter from A Current Event interviewed McFarland via satellite from his home in Dallas while simultaneously interviewing English via satellite from Tempe. English came across as mumbling, evasive, incoherent, and thoroughly unconvincing. Moreover, English claimed to be the "first Buckwheat"--even though there was only one. The fallout of the debacle was that Lynn Murray, the producer of the 20/20 segment, was fired for doing inadequate research. Thomas's son sued ABC for damages. Hugh Downs issued an on-air apology on the following 20/20 broadcast. ABC News released a half-hearted, semi-apologetic media statement describing the situation as awkward "because English truly believes he is Buckwheat." English went to his grave in November 1994 still maintaining he was Buckwheat.
Tags: Buckwheat  hoax  Our  Gang  ABC  20/20 
Added: 21st August 2011
Views: 3259
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dr Joyce Brothers Wins Game Show Jackpot Dr. Joyce Brothers is known for being a television personality, psychologist and newspaper columnist. However, she first gained national fame in late 1955 by winning the jackpot on The $64,000 Question--a quiz program on which she appeared as a boxing expert. Originally she had not planned to choose boxing as her topic. However, the show's sponsors thought it would be an attention-grabbing gimmick to have a female answer boxing questions, so she agreed. A voracious reader, Brothers studied every reference book about boxing that she could find; she would later tell reporters that her good memory allowed her to accrue a wealth of information about the sweet science--so much so that she had no difficulty with even the toughest questions. When the TV quiz show scandals broke in 1959, Brothers insisted that she had never cheated, nor had she ever been given any answers to questions in advance. Subsequent investigations verified that she had indeed won her jackpot honestly. (No contestant on The $64,000 Question was ever proven to have cheated.) Brothers' success on The $64,000 Question earned her a chance to be the color commentator for CBS during a middleweight title match between Carmen Basilio and Sugar Ray Robinson. She thus became the first woman ever to be a boxing announcer.
Tags: Dr  Joyce  Brothers  boxing  game  show 
Added: 22nd September 2011
Views: 2160
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Posted By: Lava1964
Im an Old Cowhand- Bing Crosby Tags: Im  an  Old  Cowhand-  Bing  Crosby 
Added: 2nd November 2011
Views: 1763
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Posted By: Old Fart
Disco Demolition Night - 1979 Disco Demolition Night--one of baseball's most ill-conceived promotions--caused a rare MLB forfeit on July 12, 1979. It occurred at Chicago's Comiskey Park between games of a Thursday doubleheader between the hometown White Sox and visiting Detroit Tigers. Popular Chicago disc jockey Steve Dahl had been fired from radio station WDAI when he mentioned--on the air--that he listened to the album-oriented rock of rival station WLUP rather than his own station's fare--predominantly disco tunes. Dahl was subsequently hired by WLUP, known locally as "The Loop." The 1979 White Sox were a mediocre team struggling to attract decent crowds, so the team's management was willing to try anything to try to draw new fans. Dahl, in conjunction with Mike Veeck (son of then-White Sox owner Bill Veeck), devised a promotion: Anyone who brought a disco record to the ballpark would be admitted for just 98 cents. The records would be collected, placed in a large crate in center field, and blown up by Dahl between games. Dahl hyped the event on The Loop, hoping that 12,000 people might show up--double the typical Thursday attendance at Comiskey Park. The turnout exceeded all expectations. An estimated 90,000 people turned up at the 52,000-seat stadium. When the box office stopped selling tickets, thousands of people still got in by climbing over walls. It was an atypical baseball crowd to be sure. Broadcasters Harry Caray and Jimmy Piersall commented on the "strange people" wandering throughout the stands. When the crate was filled with records, stadium staff stopped collecting them. The "fans" who still had records soon realized they were shaped like frisbees. A few began to throw records from the stands during the game. After the first game, a 4-1 Tigers' win, Dahl, clad in army fatigues and a helmet, proceeded to center field. The crate containing the records was rigged with explosives. Dahl led the crowd in chants of "Disco sucks!" prior to triggering the explosion. When detonated, the explosives tore a hole in the outfield grass and a small fire began burning. Dahl triumphantly circled the warning track in a jeep before leaving the field. Once Dahl left, the White Sox started warming up for the second game, but thousands of fans rushed the field. Some lit more fires. Others pulled down the batting cage and wrecked it. Bases were stolen and chunks of the outfield grass were ripped away. Most trespassers wandered around aimlessly, though a number of participants burned banners, sat on the grass, ran from security and police and threw records into the air. Veeck and Caray used the PA system to implore the fans to vacate the field, but to no avail. Eventually the field was cleared by police in riot gear. Six people reported minor injuries and 39 were arrested for disorderly conduct. The field was so badly torn up that the umpires decided the second game could not be played. The next day American League president Lee MacPhail forfeited the second game to the Tigers on the grounds that the White Sox had not provided acceptable playing conditions. For the rest of the season, fielders complained about Comiskey Park's playing surface being substandard. No AL game has been forfeited since that night.
Tags: baseball  riot  disco  Comiskey  Park 
Added: 30th January 2012
Views: 5799
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Posted By: Lava1964
Death Wish Movies Death Wish was a 1974 movie loosely based on a 1972 novel by Brian Garfield. The plot focuses on the relentless vigilantism of a seemingly mild-mannered architecht Paul Kersey (Charles Bronson), a Korean War veteran. Kersey methodically pursues the band of criminals who raped and killed his wife during a home invasion. (Kersey's married daughter is also raped and suffers permanent psychological damage.) The film was notweorthy for its disturbing realism in the home-invasion scene and the ruthlessness in which Kersey stalks and mercilessly kills the culprits. The film received mixed to extremely negative reviews upon its release due to its support of vigilantism, but it had an impact on U.S. audiences. People were known to loudly cheer widely during the revenge-killing scenes. The movie did especially well at the box office in violence-plagued urban areas. Four sequels were made in the next two decades. Not surprisingly, the Death Wish films caused widespread debate over how to deal with rampant urban crime. Many critics were displeased with the film. One declared it to be an "immoral threat to society" and an encouragement of antisocial behavior. Vincent Canby of the New York Times was one of the most outspoken writers, condemning Death Wish in two extensive articles. Author Brian Garfield was also unhappy with the how the film varied greatly from his book. He called the film 'incendiary', and stated that each of the following sequels are all pointless and rancid, since they all advocate vigilantism unlike his two novels which are the exact opposite. Bronson defended the film: He felt it was intended to be a commentary on violence and was meant to attack violence, not romanticize it. Over time many critics began to warm to the original film more than the four sequels, which were more exploitative and contrived.
Tags: Death  Wish  movies  Charles  Bronson  vigilantism   
Added: 16th May 2012
Views: 1257
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Posted By: Lava1964

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