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Bay City Blues A short-lived series created by Steven Bochco after Hill Street Blues.
Tags: Steven    Bochco    MTM    Mike    Post    Sharon    Stone    Dennis    Franz    Baseball    Team     
Added: 14th February 2010
Views: 1362
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Posted By: pfc
First World War Liberty Bond Poster A propaganda poster from the First World War, encouraging Americans to buy Liberty Bonds, shows a German about to be impaled on an American bayonet.
Tags: poster  First  World  War 
Added: 8th April 2010
Views: 1838
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Posted By: Lava1964
NFL Champs Vs. College All-Stars 1934-1976 The Chicago Charities College All-Star Game was a preseason football tilt played annually (except 1974) from 1934 to 1976 between the National Football League champions and a team of star college seniors from the previous year. (There was one exception: The 1935 game involved the 1934 runner-up Chicago Bears instead of the champion New York Giants.) The game originally was a benefit for Chicago-area charities. Except for the 1943 and 1944 games which were held at Northwestern University, the game was always played at Soldier Field in Chicago. The first game, played before a crowd of 79,432 on August 31, 1934, was a scoreless tie between the all-stars and the Chicago Bears. The following year, a game that included future president Gerald Ford, the Bears won, 5-0. The first all-star win was in 1937 for a squad that featured Sammy Baugh. In the 1940s the games were competitive affairs that attracted large crowds to Soldier Field. But as the talent level of pro football improved, the all-stars had diminishing success. The last all-star win came in 1963, when a team coached by legendary quarterback Otto Graham beat the Green Bay Packers 20-17. By the 1970s, crowds for the event were dwindling. In addition, NFL coaches were reluctant to part with their new draftees (who would miss part of training camp) for a meaningless exhibition in which the players might be injured. A players' strike forced the cancellation of the 1974 game. The last game took place in a torrential downpour on July 23, 1976. Despite featuring stars such as Chuck Muncie, Mike Pruitt, Lee Roy Selmon and Jackie Slater, the collegians were hopelessly outclassed by the Pittsburgh Steelers. Pittsburgh was leading 24-0 late in the third quarter when play was suspended due to the awful weather conditions. The game was not restarted. Chicago Tribune Charities Inc., the sponsor of the game, elected not to bring it back for 1977. A program from the 1941 game is shown here. Overall, the NFL teams won 31 of the 42 games. The all-stars won nine. Two games ended in ties.
Tags: football  all-stars  NFL 
Added: 13th December 2010
Views: 42222
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Posted By: Lava1964
Saturday Night Live With Howard Cosell Saturday Night Live with Howard Cosell was a dreadful variety program that ran on ABC from September 1975 to January 1976. It, of course, was hosted by sports announcer Howard Cosell and produced by Roone Arledge of Monday Night Football fame. It was later remembered by its director Don Mischer as 'one of the greatest disasters in the history of television,' largely due to Cosell and Arledge being unfamiliar with comedy and variety programming. Coincidentally, that same year NBC began airing a late-night comedy show titled Saturday Night. The shows did not directly compete. (Cosell's program aired at 8 p.m. whereas NBC's show aired at 11:30 p.m.) Cosell's show featured Bill Murray, Brian Doyle-Murray, and Christopher Guest as regular comedy performers dubbed 'The Prime Time Players.' In response, the NBC show called its regular performers 'the Not-Ready-For-Prime-Time Players.' Ironically, all three of the original Prime Time Players eventually joined the NBC show. The premiere episode featured celebrity guests Frank Sinatra, Shirley Bassey, Paul Anka, Siegfried and Roy, the cast of the Broadway version of The Wiz, Jimmy Connors, John Denver and the Bay City Rollers (whom Cosell dubbed 'the next British phenomenon'). The show was often hectic and unprepared. In one instance, Arledge learned that Lionel Hampton was in New York City and invited the musician to appear just an hour before airtime. The show fared poorly among critics and audiences alike, with TV Guide calling it 'dead on arrival, with a cringingly awkward host.' Alan King, the show's 'executive in charge of comedy,' admitted it was difficult to turn Cosell into a variety show host, saying Cosell 'made Ed Sullivan look like Buster Keaton.' Saturday Night Live with Howard Cosell was canceled on January 17, 1976, after only 18 episodes. A year later, in 1977, NBC's Saturday Night was renamed Saturday Night Live.
Tags: Saturday  Night  Live  Howard  Cosell  variety  TV 
Added: 17th December 2010
Views: 2897
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jack Lalanne Passes Today At Age 96 Jack LaLanne, the fitness guru and tireless television exercise-show host who demonstrated jumping jacks and push-ups while touting low-sugar diets and weight training long before they were fashionable, has died. He was 96. LaLanne died of pneumonia today at his home in Morro Bay, California, the Associated Press reported, citing his agent, Rick Hersh. LaLanne, who sometimes referred to himself as the Godfather of Fitness, was a TV pioneer in 1951 when he hosted one of the first exercise programs. His following grew when “The Jack LaLanne Show” was syndicated nationally from 1956 to 1970. The muscular host demonstrated calisthenics while amusing the home audience with his patter: “Ten seconds on the lips and a lifetime on the hips” and “Your waistline is your lifeline.”
Tags: Jack  Lalanne  Passes  Today  At  Age  96  exercise  guru  fingertip  pushups  health   
Added: 24th January 2011
Views: 1398
Rating:
Posted By: Old Fart
1958 New Jersey Commuter Train Disaster On Sept. 15, 1958, a horrible accident befell a commuter train shuttling passengers from New Jersey to New York City. It was a Tuesday morning after rush hour so the train had only 100 passengers--about a quarter of its capacity. Shortly following 10 a.m., Central Railroad train No. 3314 out of Bayhead stopped at Elizabethport on the western shore of Newark Bay. The train plunged off the end of an open bridge, killing 48 passengers, including a high executive from one of the larger corporations in the country and retired New York Yankees second baseman George (Snuffy) Stirnweiss. Other passengers included an investment banker carrying a brief case that contained $250,000 in negotiable bonds, a federal agent carrying a top secret device for communicating with satellites, and the mayor of a town in southern New Jersey. The accident occurred when the train plunged off the end of a bridge that had opened to allow a boat to pass on Newark Bay. Questions still remain about the accident, and why the crew ignored at least three warnings to stop and arrived at the edge of the bridge at exactly the wrong moment - sending three cars into the turbulent waters below. Although some reports suggest that the train engineer, Lloyd Wilburn, 63, suffered a heart attack before drowning as a result of the crash, the investigation later showed his train moved well above the 22-mile-per-hour speed limit for the bridge and passed through three signals notifying him and other crew members that the bridge was open ahead.
Tags: bridge  train  disaster  New  Jersey 
Added: 30th January 2011
Views: 4850
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Niagara Falls Dries Up - 1848 The photo below is an aerial view of what Niagara Falls usually looks like. But for a period of about 40 hours on March 29-31, 1848 Niagara Falls stopped. No water flowed over the great cataract for the first time in recorded history. Not surprisngly people went a little nuts. Niagara Falls was already a big tourist attraction by 1848. Villages sprouted on both the U.S. and Canadian sides of the river to accommodate the sightseeing throngs. Residents also built waterwheels to harness the Niagara River’s power to run mills and drive machinery in factories. An American farmer out for a stroll shortly before midnight on March 29 was the first to notice something. Actually, he noticed the absence of something--the thundering roar of the falls. When he went to the river’s edge, he saw hardly any water. Came the dawn of March 30, people awoke to an unaccustomed silence. The mighty Niagara was a mere trickle. Mills and factories shut down because the waterwheels had stopped. The bed of the river was exposed. Fish died and turtles floundered about. Brave—or foolish— people walked on the river bottom, picking up exposed guns, bayonets and tomahawks as souvenirs. Was it the end of the world? Perhaps it was divine retribution for what some folks thought was a U.S. war of aggression against Mexico? In an age of religious revivals, theological explanations abounded. Fearing the end of the world, thousands of people filled special church services praying for the falls to start flowing and the world to continue, or for salvation and forgiveness of their sins as the Last Judgment approached. Because communications were haphazard in 1848, no one knew why the falls had stopped. But from Buffalo, NY word eventually arrived that explained the bare falls and dry riverbed. Strong southwest gale winds had pushed huge chunks of ice to the extreme northeastern tip of Lake Erie, blocking the lake’s outlet into the head of the Niagara River. The ice jam had become an ice dam. And just as news traveled inward, news also traveled outward. Thousands came from nearby cities and towns to look at the spectacle of Niagara Falls without water. People crossed the riverbed on foot, on horseback and in horse-drawn buggies. Mounted U.S. Army cavalry soldiers paraded up and down the empty Niagara River. It was a potentially hazardous act for there was no telling when the rushing waters might return. One entrepreneur used the hiatus to do some safety work. The Maid of the Mist sightseeing boat had been taking tourists on river rides below the falls since 1846, and there were some dangerous rocks it always had to avoid. Since the river had ceased running and the rocks were in plain sight, the boat’s owner sent workers out to blast the rocks away with explosives. March 30 was not the only dry day. No water flowed over the falls throughout the daylight hours of March 31. But that night a distant rumble came from upriver. The low-pitched noise drew nearer and louder. Suddenly a wall of water came roaring down the upper Niagara River and over the falls with a giant thunder. The ice jam had cleared. To the relief of the locals, the river was running again.
Tags: Niagara  Falls  dries  up  natural  history 
Added: 21st March 2011
Views: 3596
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Washington Senators Last Game - 1971 The Washington Senators' 71st and last season in the American League came to a sad and strange end on September 30, 1971. Some 14,000 disenchanted fans came to RFK stadium one last time to see the home team play the New York Yankees in a meaningless contest. Many brought along insulting and obscene banners denouncing team owner Bob Short who had announced the team was relocating to Texas for the 1972 season. Love was showered on the players, though. Even the most mediocre Senators were given hearty cheers when they first came to bat. The loudest ovation was saved for slugging fan favorite Frank Howard who responded with a home run. However, things began to turn ugly in the eighth inning just after the Senators had taken a 7-5 lead. Here's Shirley Povich's account of what happened as it appeared in the next day's Washington Post: "As if in sudden awareness that the end of major-league baseball in Washington was only one inning way, the mood hardened. 'We want Bob Short!' was the cry that picked up in loud and angry chorus, and it was the baying-fury sound of a lynch mob. Then a swarm of young kids, squirts who wouldn't know what it had meant to have a big-league team all these years, or what it would mean to lose one, flooded onto the field from all points of the stands. A public address announcement warned that the home team could forfeit the game unless the field was cleared, and pretty soon the game resumed. It got as far as two out in the ninth, the Senators' 7-5 lead intact, no Yankee on base, when one young rebel from the stands set off again. He grabbed first base and ran off with it. Some unbelievers, undaunted by the warning of forfeit, cheered, and from out of the stands poured hundreds, maybe a couple of thousand fans. They took over the infield, the outfield, grabbed off every base as a souvenir, tried to get the numbers and lights from the scoreboard or anything else removable, and by their numbers left police and the four umpires helpless to intervene. The mad scene on the field, with the athletes of both teams taking refuge in their dugouts, brought official announcement of Yankees 9, Senators 0, baseball's traditional forfeit count almost since Abner Doubleday notched the first baseball score on the handiest twig at Cooperstown. But by then the crowd-mood was philosophical, 'So what?' Or more accurately, 'So what the hell?' The Senators were finished, even if the ball game wasn't."
Tags: baseball  riot  1971  Washington  Senators 
Added: 16th January 2012
Views: 4829
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hot Dog-Eating Champ Takeru Kobayashi At the prestigious annual Nathan's Hot Dog eating championship in 2001, a skinny, unheralded 23-year-old Japanese contestant named Takeru Kobayashi blew away the field by consuming 50 hot dogs (and buns!) in 12 minutes to double the previous world record. Organizers were so unprepared for Kobayashi's spectacular display of gluttony that they had to resort to hand-written signage to keep track of his astonishing total of devoured dogs. To prove it was no fluke, Kobayashi won the next five Fourth of July Coney Island classics too--with totals of 50, 50.5, 44.5, 53.5 and 53.75 hot dogs respectively. In 2007, despite downing a personal best 63 hot dogs, Kobayashi was upset by American upstart Joey Chestnut. Chestnut also get the better of Kobayashi in 2008 and 2009. In 2010, Kobayashi ran afoul of event organizers when he refused to sign an exclusive contract with Major League Eating, the organization that runs the Coney Island event. Kobayashi was actually arrested as an intruder at the 2010 event when he climbed onstage to congratulate Chestnut on another victory. Kobayashi, nicknamed "The Tsunami" has set several world records in other eating disciplines, such as bratwurst, hamburgers, lobster rolls, and rice balls.
Tags: hot  dog  eating  Takeru  Kobayashi 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 1427
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Posted By: Lava1964
Super Bowl XXXI 31January 26 1997 Green Bay Packers Tribute It had been nearly three decades since Vince Lombardi's powerhouse Packers ruled the NFL. But the wait was finally over when Green Bay's loyal fans were rewarded in 1996 as the Pack stormed to the league's best record en route to Super Bowl XXXI. The Win comes back to "Titletown USA" by bringing the Lombardi Trophy back home.They beat the New England Patriots 35-21
Tags: Super  Bowl  XXX  31January  26  1997  Green  Bay  Packers  Tribute 
Added: 17th August 2012
Views: 1136
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Posted By: masonx31

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