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Whats My Line Interactive Game Part 3 It's back--by popular demand--the third installment of the What's My Line interactive game! Here's how it works: I'll pretend I'm the late, great John Daly, the unsurpassed host of the original WML show. I will moderate this segment. A mystery guest has just entered the studio. (He or she could be living or dead.) Your task is to identify the famous mystery challenger by asking questions that can be answered either yes or no. Good luck. The mystery challenger has just entered and signed in to thunderous applause. Let's begin...
Tags: WML  interactive  game 
Added: 19th September 2009
Views: 1196
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Posted By: Lava1964
Willard Hershberger - Baseball Suicide The only active major league baseball player to commit suicide during a season was Cincinnati Reds' catcher Willard Hershberger. The 30-year-old Hershberger was in his third season as a backup catcher for the Reds. Often moody, Hershberger was a loner who was extremely critical of his own play. When regular Reds' catcher Ernie Lombardi was injured during the 1940 season, Hershberger took over, batting a very respectable .309 and playing well defensively. On July 31, though, the Reds blew a late lead against the New York Giants at the Polo Grounds. Hershberger blamed himself for the loss and became sullen. The Reds then travelled to Boston where they lost both games of a doubleheader to a weak Boston Bees team on August 2. Afterwards, Hershberger met with Reds' manager Bill McKechnie to discuss personal problems. The next day, when Hershberger failed to appear at the ballpark, a search of his Boston hotel room found Hershberger dead in a pool of his own blood. He had slit his wrists with a razor. (There was a history of suicide in the family: Hershberger's father had killed himself in 1926.) Manager McKechnie never elaborated on the personal issues he had discussed with his troubled catcher.
Tags: Willard  Hershberger  baseball  suicide 
Added: 1st October 2009
Views: 3705
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dynamite Magazine Dynamite was a celebrity-oriented publication geared for young teen readers. It was available through Scholastic Book Services. The appeal of the magazine was the large number of posters it usually contained. Often there was no advertising. Robert Hegyes of Welcome Back, Kotter is featured on the cover of this issue from 1977.
Tags: Dynamite  magazine  teen  readers 
Added: 22nd October 2009
Views: 2400
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Posted By: Lava1964
Chuck Cunningham Vanishes When Happy Days debuted in 1974, there were three Cunningham children: Joanie, Richie, and Chuck. Chuck, the eldest, was supposed to be a mentoring-type, college-age big brother to middle child Richie. The jockish Chuck's roles were small--so small that few viewers noticed that two different actors (Gavan O'Herlihy, shown in the photo; and Randolph Roberts) were cast as Chuck. By 1975, when the show went to live tapings and Fonzie became Richie's mentor, Chuck was simply dropped from the show with no explanation. He was only mentioned in one episode after the first season--and that was a flashback episode where his presence had to be explained. Several times in later episodes, Howard and Marion Cunningham both refer to having just two children. Tom Bosley, who played Howard, liked to joke in interviews that Chuck had 'accepted a full scholarship at the University of Outer Mongolia.'
Tags: Happy  Days  Chuck  Cunningham 
Added: 23rd October 2009
Views: 1645
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Posted By: Lava1964
My Three Sons - Original Cast My Three Sons premiered on ABC on September 29, 1960. Fred MacMurray (Steve Douglas) was with the series for the long haul as were second son Don Grady (Robbie)and third son Chip (Barry Livingtone). The episodes were black and white until 1965 when the show changed networks and aired on CBS. The original cast from the back-and-white years (shows that are generally not available in reruns) included Tim Considine as eldest son Mike and William Frawley as Bub O'Casey (the boys' maternal gradfather). The color era brought two cast changes: Mike was written out of the show (he had married and moved away) and replaced by a new, adopted son Ernie (Stanley Livingstone). By 1965 Frawley was in declining health, so Bub was also written out of the cast partway through the 1964-65 season (supposedly he was visiting Ireland) and replaced by his seafaring brother Uncle Charley (William Demarest).
Tags: My  Three  Sons  original  cast 
Added: 25th October 2009
Views: 5474
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Posted By: Lava1964
1980 Burger King Star Wars promo A 1980 commercial for Burger King's promotional products related to the release of THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK, the second cinematic release in the STAR WARS franchise. Almost any company hitched to this merchandising bandwagon was guaranteed to make themselves big coin.
Tags: Burger  King  TV  promo  merchandise  commercial  movie  tie  in  promo  Star  Wars  The  Empire  Strikes  Back  fast  food  1980  1980s  science  fiction 
Added: 29th October 2009
Views: 1822
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Posted By: robatsea
Checking In - Sitcom Flop 1981 The Jeffersons was a hugely successful spinoff from All in the Family, running for 10 seasons from 1975 to 1985. It also inspired a not-so-successful spinoff: Checking In. On The Jeffersons, Marla Gibbs played Florence Johnston, the sassy, wisecracking maid who regularly exchanged insults with George Jefferson. Her character was so well liked by viewers that CBS figured it would be a smart move to give Gibbs her own series. Accordingly, in episode #154 and #155 of The Jeffersons, a hotel manager was so impressed by Florence that he offered her the job as supervisor of maids at his St. Frederick Hotel. Florence accepted and Checking In was born. It premiered on Thursday, April 9, 1981. Larry Linville (Major Frank Burns from MASH fame) played Lyle Block, the hotel's weasly manager and, naturally, Florence's nemesis. After four weeks, though, Checking In was floundering in the ratings and CBS pulled the plug after the April 30 episode. Smartly, the network had Gibbs return to the Jeffersons' household as their maid. In her return episode, #161, Florence arrives at the Jeffersons' door explaining that the hotel burned down! (Her clothing and hair had traces of soot and fire damage to add credibility to the plot twist!) She had to compete with new maid Carmen to get her old job back. After missing just five shows, Gibbs' Florence character remained on The Jeffersons until the series ended in 1985. Marla Gibbs was nominated for an Emmy as Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series Emmy in for five stright years (1981 through 1985) for her role as Florence Johnston. Gibbs' career accomplishments are even more impressive when one considers she was married at age 13 and had three children by age 20! She still managed to graduate from Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago. A performer in amateur theatricals, Gibbs was working as a customer service agent for United Airlines when she got her role on The Jeffersons. Cautiously, she waited until The Jeffersons was a bonafide hit show before quitting her job at United!
Tags: Marla  Gibbs  checking  In  Jeffersons  sitcom 
Added: 28th August 2011
Views: 3055
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
College Football Hoax 1941 In the autumn of 1941 many football fans began following the exploits of Plainfield (NJ) Teachers College. Too bad the school and its football team didn't really exist. It was an elaborate hoax that fooled hundreds of newspapers--even the New York Times' sports department--and thousands of college football fans. Stockbroker Morris Newburger and radio announcer Alexander (Bink) Dannenbaum concocted the idea of a mythical college football team. Using the name 'Jerry Croyden,' Newburger telephoned the New York City newspapers while Dannenbaum phoned the Philadelphia papers with fantastic stories of Plainfield's lopsided victories over nonexistent schools. With the newspapers printing Plainfield's scores week after week without question, Newburger and Dannenbaum got bolder. They began writing creative press releases about the new football powerhouse. One release praised Plainfield's star runningback, a 'full-blooded Chinese-American' sophomore named Johnny (The Celestial Comet) Chung. Chung's amazing abilities on the gridiron were credited to the handfuls of wild rice he ate during huddles. The Teachers' offense operated out of an innovative 'W' formation in which all the linemen but the center faced backwards. Colorful Hopalong Hobelitz was named as Plainfield's coach. Six weeks of spectacular Plainfield victories raised speculation that the team might secure a bid to a coveted bowl game. Curious journalist Red Smith of the Philadelphia Record journeyed to Plainfield to find the college. Of course, there wasn't one. Their fraud exposed, Newburger and Dannenbaum confessed--but only after Jerry Croyden issued one final bogus press release. It announced Plainfield was forfeiting its remaining games because Chung and several other players were declared academically ineligible after flunking their exams.
Tags: Plainfield  Teachers  College  football  hoax 
Added: 12th November 2009
Views: 4155
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Posted By: Lava1964
NBA Shot Clock Invented 1954 It was the innovation that saved professional basketball: The 24-second shot clock. Coach Howard Hobson came up with with the idea of a shot clock, but it was first used in 1954 in Syracuse, New York. There Danny Biasone, the owner of the National Basketball Association's Syracuse Nationals, experimented with a 24-second version during a scrimmage game. He then convinced the NBA to adopt it. In the pre-shot clock days, the NBA had problems attracting fans and television coverage. This was largely due to the stalling tactics used by teams once they took the lead. Without the shot clock, teams could pass the ball in the front court endlessly without penalty. If the team in the lead chose to stall, the trailing team was forced to commit fouls to get the ball back following the free throw. Low-scoring, boring games with many fouls were common. The most extreme case occurred on November 22, 1950, when the Fort Wayne Pistons defeated the Minneapolis Lakers 19-18. A few weeks later, the Rochester Royals and Indianapolis Olympians played a soporific six-overtime game with only one shot in each overtime. The NBA tried several rule changes in the early 1950s to speed up the game and reduce fouls before eventually adopting Biasone's idea. How did Biasone arrive at the strange figure of 24 seconds? According to Biasone, 'I looked at the box scores from games I enjoyed, games where they didn't screw around and stall. I noticed each team took about 60 shots. That meant 120 shots per game. So I took 48 minutes--2,880 seconds--and divided that by 120 shots. The result was 24 seconds per shot.' When the shot clock first came into vogue, it made players so nervous that it hardly came into play; players were generally taking fewer than 20 seconds to shoot. According to Syracuse player Dolph Schayes, 'We thought we had to take quick shots. But as time went on, we saw the inherent genius in Danny's 24 seconds. You could work the ball around for a good shot.'
Tags: NBA  shot  clock 
Added: 15th November 2009
Views: 3793
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hal Block WML Outcast Hal Block was a regular panelist on What's My Line? from 1950 to 1953. He started his career as a joke writer in Chicago and once toured overseas with Bob Hope. He was not well liked by the other WML panelists because of his lack of dignity. Years later Bennett Cerf referred to Block as 'a clod.' WML producer Gil Fates recalled, 'Hal was a strange man. He was rumored to have come from a very wealthy family in Chicago, where he wrote material for some of the standout, stand-up comics in the business. He was stocky with curly black hair, heavy lips, and rather bulging eyes. He wore bow ties, stood around with his hands clasped behind his back, and smiled most of the time. He seemed completely uninhibited by either sensitivity or propriety. He referred to Ethel Barrymore as 'you doll' and planted big wet kisses on both Sister Kenny and Helen Hayes as they passed down the panel to say goodbye. For our deodorant sponsor he gratuitously coined the phrase, 'Make your armpit a charmpit.' Hal was totally oblivious to the panel's distaste for his jokes or to the icy correctness with which John Daly would greet one of his appalling observations. 'You're the prettiest nun I ever saw,' he once complimented a Dominican Sister in full habit. 'So what was so wrong?' he asked in defense. 'She was a real doll.' You couldn't teach the meaning of good taste to Hal any more than StarKist could teach it to Charlie the Tuna. Hal's relationship to the show was much like that of the small-town, stay-at-home wife to her rising young corporate executive husband. Hal had served his purpose when the program was young, but now that we were a class product his gaucheries were no longer tolerable.' In March 1953 Block was quietly replaced on the WML panel by the much more urbane Steve Allen. Block died, pretty much forgotten, from injuries he suffered in an apartment fire, in 1981 at age 67.
Tags: Hal  Block  Whats  My  Line  panelist 
Added: 17th November 2009
Views: 4474
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Posted By: Lava1964

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