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The Lone Ranger This is the opening theme to The Lone Ranger, which starred Clayton Moore and Jay Silverheels, and aired from 1949 to 1957. Originally, Tonto rode double with the Lone Ranger on Silver, but after a publicity photo was taken of the Lone Ranger and Tonto this way, the producers wisely decided to give Tonto his own steed.
Tags: lone  ranger  westerns  clayton  moore  jay  silverheels 
Added: 12th August 2007
Views: 3495
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
         Our Miss Brooks  Opening October 3,1952 to May 11,1956. The trials and tribulations of Connie Brooks, the wisecracking English teacher at Madison High School. Stories revolved around her romantic misadventures as she struggled to impress fellow teacher Philip Boynton (Robert Rockwell and played on the radio show by Jeff Chandler), the biology instructor; and her continual clash with crusty, blustery Osgood P. Conklin (Gale Gordon), the principal. Connie rented a room from kindly old Mrs. Davis and rode to school each morning with one of her students, the dimwitted Walter Denton (Richard Crenna). This was a great show. My daughter, who collects old radio shows, has an entire set of these and they had me in stitches every night!
Tags: our  miss  brooks  eve  arden  comedy  television 
Added: 16th August 2007
Views: 3499
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
THE OUTER LIMITS    Opening This sci-fi anthology series ran for two seasons from 1963 to 1965 in black-and-white. It was revived in 1995 and ran for seven more seasons, until 2002. Personally I feel that the original series was better, even though special effects-wise they were inferior to what was available in the newer version.
Tags: outer  limits  science  fiction  television 
Added: 22nd August 2007
Views: 3156
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Gene Gene The Dancing Machine Eugene Patton, better known as Gene Gene The Dancing Machine, was a regular non-competing act on The Gong Show. Patton was an NBC stagehand. According to host Chuck Barris, Patton often danced backstage to the music of other acts. Barris thought Patton's style of dancing was amusing, so he persuaded Patton to dance on a show that was otherwise going to run a couple of minutes short. Strutting his stuff to a blended version of two Count Basie songs (Jumpin' at the Woodside and Two O'Clock Jump), the public reaction was favorable and Gene became a semi-regular. This clip shows an early appearance of Gene Gene the Dancing Machine because soon afterwards it became part of the shtick for Patton's fellow stagehands to litter the stage with an assortment of bizarre random objects: inflatable toys, sports equipment, clothing, furniture, mannequins, etc. (It was the 1970s. You had to be there.)
Tags: Gong  Show  Gene  Dancing  Machine 
Added: 1st October 2007
Views: 6021
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
              Could it be Ronald McDonalds Evil Twin    Remember when you were a kid and your parents took you to the circus? Didn't you just love the funny clowns? Thanks to Stephen King, all that changed when he created his most evil character, Pennywise. Here's a clip from the 1990 film IT with Tim Curry at his best as Pennywise the Dancing Clown...still gives me chills when I watch it.
Tags: it  pennywise  the  dancing  clown  tim  curry 
Added: 20th October 2007
Views: 2244
Rating:
Posted By: Babs64
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 3116
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Early Muppet Commercials In the 60's, the most popular of Jim Henson's commercials was a series for the local Wilkins Coffee company in Washington, D.C., in which his Muppets were able to get away with a greater level of slapstick violence than might otherwise have been acceptable with human actors. The first seven-second commercial for Wilkins was an immediate hit and was syndicated and reshot by Henson for local coffee companies across the United States. He ultimately produced more than 300 coffee ads.
Tags: jim  henson  muppets  wilkins  coffee  commercials 
Added: 21st November 2007
Views: 3258
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Posted By: Sophia
Dobie Gray   Out On The Floor This is probably the single biggest and most acclaimed Northern Soul record of all time. This performance was filmed for 'The Strange World Of Northern Soul' in Nashville, in early 1999. Dobie is otherwise best known for his 1965 'The In Crowd' and 1973's 'Drift Away.' He was a versatile vocalist who could handle soul, country, and pop. 'Out On The Floor' remains his most beloved soul anthem.
Tags: dobie  grey  out  on  the  floor  drift  away  the  in  crowd  northern  soul 
Added: 18th December 2007
Views: 1879
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Posted By: Babs64
Morecambe and Wise This duo were regular Saturday night viewing for years in the UK. Everybody has their favourite sketch. This is one of mine. Hollywood stars, music groups and singers all fell over themselves to be on their show. Andre Previn does well to keep a straight face.
Tags: Comedy  UK  TV  Eric  And  Ernie 
Added: 16th January 2008
Views: 1983
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Posted By: donmac101
Fool On The Hill 1990 Getback Concert Tommy7's Beatles clips got me to thinking about one of my favorite songs, Paul's 'Fool on the Hill', that was recorded in 1967. This clip was taken from the 1990 'Getback' Concert. It's funny how there was always talk about exactly what some of these songs meant. With this song, Paul stated that he 'was writing about someone like Maharishi' - a person who is called a fool by many but is in fact wise. In Alistair Taylor's book, 'Yesterday', Taylor wrote about a mysterious incident involving a man who inexplicably appeared near him and Paul during a walk on Primrose Hill, and then disappeared again, soon after they had conversed about the existence of God. This allegedly prompted the writing of the song.
Tags: paul  mccartney  fool  on  the  hill  getback  concert  beatles  music 
Added: 1st January 2008
Views: 1532
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi

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