Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Disco Demolition Night - 1979 Disco Demolition Night--one of baseball's most ill-conceived promotions--caused a rare MLB forfeit on July 12, 1979. It occurred at Chicago's Comiskey Park between games of a Thursday doubleheader between the hometown White Sox and visiting Detroit Tigers. Popular Chicago disc jockey Steve Dahl had been fired from radio station WDAI when he mentioned--on the air--that he listened to the album-oriented rock of rival station WLUP rather than his own station's fare--predominantly disco tunes. Dahl was subsequently hired by WLUP, known locally as "The Loop." The 1979 White Sox were a mediocre team struggling to attract decent crowds, so the team's management was willing to try anything to try to draw new fans. Dahl, in conjunction with Mike Veeck (son of then-White Sox owner Bill Veeck), devised a promotion: Anyone who brought a disco record to the ballpark would be admitted for just 98 cents. The records would be collected, placed in a large crate in center field, and blown up by Dahl between games. Dahl hyped the event on The Loop, hoping that 12,000 people might show up--double the typical Thursday attendance at Comiskey Park. The turnout exceeded all expectations. An estimated 90,000 people turned up at the 52,000-seat stadium. When the box office stopped selling tickets, thousands of people still got in by climbing over walls. It was an atypical baseball crowd to be sure. Broadcasters Harry Caray and Jimmy Piersall commented on the "strange people" wandering throughout the stands. When the crate was filled with records, stadium staff stopped collecting them. The "fans" who still had records soon realized they were shaped like frisbees. A few began to throw records from the stands during the game. After the first game, a 4-1 Tigers' win, Dahl, clad in army fatigues and a helmet, proceeded to center field. The crate containing the records was rigged with explosives. Dahl led the crowd in chants of "Disco sucks!" prior to triggering the explosion. When detonated, the explosives tore a hole in the outfield grass and a small fire began burning. Dahl triumphantly circled the warning track in a jeep before leaving the field. Once Dahl left, the White Sox started warming up for the second game, but thousands of fans rushed the field. Some lit more fires. Others pulled down the batting cage and wrecked it. Bases were stolen and chunks of the outfield grass were ripped away. Most trespassers wandered around aimlessly, though a number of participants burned banners, sat on the grass, ran from security and police and threw records into the air. Veeck and Caray used the PA system to implore the fans to vacate the field, but to no avail. Eventually the field was cleared by police in riot gear. Six people reported minor injuries and 39 were arrested for disorderly conduct. The field was so badly torn up that the umpires decided the second game could not be played. The next day American League president Lee MacPhail forfeited the second game to the Tigers on the grounds that the White Sox had not provided acceptable playing conditions. For the rest of the season, fielders complained about Comiskey Park's playing surface being substandard. No AL game has been forfeited since that night.
Tags: baseball  riot  disco  Comiskey  Park 
Added: 30th January 2012
Views: 5978
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Surge The Drink Commercial 1997 My guess due to not selling enough, they stopped production?.. Crazy right? I know.. great stuff.. I'd drink this over Mountain Dew since it came out. As a Kid I grabbed for this in the fridge first! after School 1996 In 1996, Coca-Cola started production on Surge, a variation of the Norwegian soft drink named Urge. Surge was produced and marketed in the United States, with its original whitepaper name being "MDK," or "Mountain Dew Killer."[1] Surge's release was accompanied by a vast nationwide marketing campaign that led to initially high sales and popularity. A few years after the release, sales began to slip, and as a result the Coca-Cola company ceased production of Surge in can and bottle form in 2002. They proceeded to discontinue Surge fountain syrup in 2003. Save Surge: After the discontinuation of Surge in cans, a community was formed by web designer Eric "Karks" Karkovach entitled "SAVE SURGE." The movement initially mapped the locations at which Surge could be purchased in fountain form. Upon cancellation of the fountain syrup, the community continued, adopting an approach of activism. Members would create "recipes" meant to mimic the look and taste of Surge, sign and distribute petitions, protest at their local bottling plants, and otherwise pressure Coca-Cola to bring back their favorite beverage. They got a response in 2005 when Vault was brought to market, and while Coca-Cola has yet to confirm the similarity in taste and appearance, the members of the movement took the inception of Vault as the fruit of their labors. Its really simple. Surge Movement Upon the discontinuation of Vault in December 2011, the "SURGE MOVEMENT" formed on Facebook as an activist group to lobby Coca-Cola for the soft drink's return. Sharing the same goal as its predecessor, the group seeks to have Surge produced once more, as a result of Vault's discontinuation. The group repetitively posts requests on Coca-Cola's Facebook page, and encourages its members to call Coca-Cola's feedback hotline to voice their desires further. The Movement initially has gained over 9,000 Facebook "likes" in the months after it was started and continues to grow. The members plan on continuing to flood the walls of Coca-Cola and its subsidiaries until they receive an official statement from the company. Bring it back?...YES.. why not Most likely it will be a hit due to the fact its been gone for some time..One last thing, yes the Original design can was the best.. it wasn't made with straight edges like the 2nd edition.. it was meant to be different with the bubble style lettering!
Tags: Surge  The  Drink  Commercial  1997 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1850
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Prehistoric Facebook Tags: Prehistoric  Facebook  writing  on  walls  caves 
Added: 3rd September 2014
Views: 1123
Rating:
Posted By: BigBoy Bob

Pages: 1 [2] of 2 | Random