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CB Savage--Rod Hart Tags: CB  Savage--Rod  Hart  1977  One  Hit  Wonder  70's  music  CB  Radio  Rocking  Chair  18  Wheeler  Smoky  Bear  State  Trooper  Radar 
Added: 5th February 2015
Views: 904
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Posted By: pfc
Oregon Poisoned Eggs Accident - 1942 On Wednesday, November 18, 1942 a horrible mistake killed 47 patients at the Oregon State Hospital in Salem--a facility housing those afflicted with mental illnesses. An evening meal of scrambled eggs was being prepared by the two-person kitchen crew. The cooking staff had been much larger, but the manpower demands of the Second World War had reduced it to just head cook Mary O'Hare and her male assistant A.B. McKillop. Against hospital policy, McKillop designated a trusted patient, 27-year-old George A. Nosen, to go to a downstairs storage room to get a scoopful of powdered milk to add to the frozen egg yolks. Nosen entered the wrong room and brought back a six-pound scoop of roach poison from an unmarked bin. The roach poison contained huge amounts of sodium fluoride. In very tiny amounts, sodium fluoride is harmless. It is found in most toothpastes in minuscule amounts to strengthen teeth. However, even an amount as small as an aspirin can be deadly to a human. Within a short time of the eggs being served, patients became violently ill, some vomiting blood. By midnight 30 patients had died. The death toll eventually rose to 47. About 460 patients in total suffered some ill effects. McKillop quickly suspected something had gone terribly amiss because of the powdered milk. This was confirmed when Nosen showed him the bin where it had come from. Investigators were perplexed as the kitchen staff initially reported that nothing outside the norm had happened in preparing the meal. Beyond the hospital theories abounded about what may have caused the deaths. Some people blamed them on a deliberate act of malice by a homicidal patient. Others thought it was an extreme case of salmonella due to improper food storage. Still others thought it might be war-related sabotage as the frozen egg yolks were the same type that were being sent overseas to feed American troops. Eventually McKillop's conscience bothered him and he told the truth about Nosen mistaking the roach poison for powdered milk. McKillop wanted to be held solely responsible for the mishap, but he, O'Hare and Nosen were all arrested. They were never charged as a Grand Jury ruled the incident to have been merely a tragic accident--one that killed nearly four dozen innocent patients. Nosen remained an inmate at the hospital--where he was looked upon as a pariah--until his death in 1983 at age 68. He suffered a fatal heart attack while scuffling with a 75-year-old patient.
Tags: poisoned  eggs  Oregon  1942 
Added: 27th April 2015
Views: 1762
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tie A Yellow Ribbon - 1973 In 1972 songwriter Irwin Levine read a newspaper story about a prisoner who was overcome with angst as his pending release from jail drew nearer. He was deeply concerned that his wife would not want to remain married after his long absence from her. The prisoner, in advance of his release, asked his wife to provide a symbol of acceptance before he arrived home. Levine and co-writer L. Russell Brown took the story and turned it into one of the truly great songs from the 1970s: Tie A Yellow Ribbon (Round The Ole Oak Tree). It was recorded by Tony Orlando and Dawn, a group which hadn't had a major hit song in nearly three years. It sold three million copies in two weeks. The song revived the group and led to their getting a CBS variety show that began as a summer replacement program in 1974 and lasted for two seasons. Tie A Yellow Ribbon reached the top of the charts in April 1973 and remained there for a month. It had equal success in the UK where it sold more than one million copies and hit the top of the charts there too. According to one source, it was the second most covered song of the 1970s, trailing only Yesterday by the Beatles. It's a classic upbeat singalong tune that is a favorite at karaoke parties. Tie A Yellow Ribbon has frequently been used to welcome home troops from overseas since the 1980s. This clip shows Tony Orlando and Dawn performing it. I bet you can't listen to it without singing along!
Tags: Tie  A  Yellow  Ribbon  Tony  Orlando  Dawn 
Added: 20th May 2015
Views: 1257
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Posted By: Lava1964
Theme From The Bridge on the River Kwai The Bridge on the River Kwai won the Oscar for Best Picture of 1957. It also re-popularized "The Colonel Bogey March"--a British military song dating back to 1914. It is one of those melodies that sticks in your mind forever. In this scene from early in the film, a new batch of British Empire troops whistle the tune as they march into captivity in a brutal Japanese labor camp.
Tags: Bridge  on  the  River  Kwai  theme 
Added: 12th July 2015
Views: 1657
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Posted By: Lava1964
Verdun Ossuary - 1964 Most Americans are barely aware of it, but one of the most terrible battles in history occurred near the northern French city of Verdun from February through November 1916. The Germans launched a massive attack on February 21 with both numerical superiority and the element of surprise. Verdun was supposed to be a quiet French sector on the Western Front and was held largely by lightly regarded territorial troops. The Germans hoped to bleed the French army to at least force an armistice on the Western Front. The embattled French considered the defense of Verdun to be symbolic of resistance. "They shall not pass!" became the rallying cry of the defenders. At some point during the battle virtually every able-bodied French soldier served at the Verdun front. The carnage was atrocious as positions sometimes changed hands several times each day. Eventually the German High Command called off the attack. In those nine months of ceaseless fighting casualties approached one million, with at least 500,000 killed. In 1964 Life magazine published a pictorial feature about what Verdun looked like 48 years after the battle. Perhaps the most shocking photo was the one shown here: An ossuary containing the bones of about 130,000 unknown soldiers from both sides. Interestingly, Life's photographer was Alfred Eisenstaedt--a German veteran of the war.
Tags: Verdun  battle  ossuary  First  World  War 
Added: 22nd July 2015
Views: 1343
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Posted By: Lava1964
Wrangler Jane aka Melody Patterson Passes Age 66 Tags: Wrangler  Jane  aka  Melody  Patterson  Passes  Age  66  F  Troop  Larry  Storch  Ken  Berry 
Added: 22nd August 2015
Views: 1844
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Posted By: Cathy

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