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We Will Meet Again - WWII Song Along with Lili Marlene, We'll Meet Again, sung by Vera Lynn in the 1940's, were the most popular song(s) of the Allied soldiers during WWII. (My father was constantly singing it for 40 years after the war ended). Here is the song reprised by 29 year old Welsh mezzo-soprano, Katherine Jenkins. (She does not look very much like an opera singer). She has embraced the causes of English veterans of WWII to those presently serving in the Middle East. She performs concerts all over the U.K. for the vets and troops on active duty, along with maintaining the rigorous schedule of an opera singer. She radiates the very essence of the English girl. You will probably know the tune and join in, singing with the crowd at this Cardiff concert. The song is at once, melodic, uplifting, and nostalgic.
Tags: Vera  Lynn  We  Will  Meet  Again  WWII  song  veterans 
Added: 10th September 2009
Views: 4210
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Posted By: Watersnake
The Real Voice of General Patton Probably the most common picture we have of "old blood and guts", General George Patton, is George C. Scott's portrayal. Scott's gravely baritone voice would seem perfect for the part. The real General Patton hated his voice. It tended to be high-pitched, nasal, irritating, and at times, it bordered on effeminate. He hated public speaking because of this. To my knowledge, there exist only two short clips of him speaking. Because of his use of vivid imagery, cursing, ribald innuendos, and general vulgarity, his wife had all audio tapes of him speaking destroyed after his death. It was an effort on her part to clean up his image for posterity. He died in an auto accident in Europe after the end of WWII. One of his most famous speeches, is one given in front of The Third Army to prepare them for the long road to Berlin. This is the speech we hear in the opening moments of the movie "Patton". It was considerably sanitized for the movie in an effort to prevent people from avoiding the film. The actual text of that speech can be found in a number of places on the internet. He wrote of why he used vulgar language in addressing his troops. He felt they would better remember the important points if they were punched up with ribald expletives.
Tags: General  George  Patton    speech      voice 
Added: 11th October 2009
Views: 15854
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Posted By: Watersnake
D-Day Crossword Puzzle Security Breach In the spring of 1944 the Allies were poised to land in German-occupied France. The only uncertainty was where and when. Tight security over the enormous operation was paramount. (One American general was demoted and sent back to the Unites States for merely speculating on an invasion date at a social gathering.) Accordingly, British Intelligence was aghast when several key code names linked to the D-Day invasion began appearing as answers in the Daily Telegraph crossword puzzles in the month before the June 6 invasion. The code names of all five beaches (Gold, Sword, Juno, Omaha, Utah), the portable harbors (Mulberry), the naval support (Neptune), and the entire operation (Overlord) appeared! Agents questioned Leonard Dawe, a 54-year-old local schoolmaster, who had submitted the puzzles. Dawe didn't know what the fuss was about. He told the agents the words simply fit the puzzles. For years the incident was regarded as a remarkable coincidence. However, in 1984, one of Dawe's former students at the Strand School shed more light on the subject. Ronald French, who was 14 in 1944, said Dawe routinely had his students fill in crossword grids as a mental exercise. Dawe kept the especially good grids, wrote accompanying clues, and submitted them to the Daily Telegraph. The boys often socialized with the Allied troops stationed nearby and likely acquired the words by overhearing their conversations. There is no evidence that Dawe was a German agent, nor is there any evidence that the Germans benefitted from this odd security breach.
Tags: crossword  puzzle  D-Day  WWII  security 
Added: 25th November 2009
Views: 4412
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Posted By: Lava1964
Thanksgiving- Remembering Our Troops Happy Thanksgiving everyone! Keep our troops that are away from their families in your thoughts and prayers today!
Tags: Thanksgiving-  Remembering  Our  Troops  Military    Army    Navy    Marines    Coast  Guard    Air  Force     
Added: 26th November 2009
Views: 1520
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Posted By: Steve
Boston Bruins - 1972 Stanley Cup Champs I posted this on the CBC News website in Canada following the Boston Bruins' Stanley Cup championship on June 15, 2011. It got such a wonderful response that I thought I'd share it here too: It had been 14,279 days since captain Johnny Bucyk hoisted the Boston Bruins' last Stanley Cup on May 11, 1972. To put things in perspective... Richard Nixon was in the White House. America still had combat troops in Vietnam. If you bought a quarter's worth of candy, you could get sick eating it all. Pitchers still batted in the American League. There was no such thing as rap music or punk rock. Nobody considered the possibility of terrorist attacks at the Olympics. The NHL had 14 teams. Few players wore helmets. Some goalies didn't wear masks. Nobody seriously thought hockey players from the USSR were good. There were hardly any McDonald's Restaurants in Canada. There were very few Tim Hortons either. Archie Bunker was in his heyday. Television sets had rabbit ears. Nobody thought the world was in peril from global warming or climate change or whatever they're calling it this week. Lotteries were illegal in Canada. Arthur Godfrey Time had still been on the radio two weeks earlier. Calculators could perform four functions and cost $179. Most people had rotary telephones. Forget about DVD players--VCRs didn't exist. The idea of bottled water would have been laughable. Computers were enormous things that occupied entire rooms and did simple calculations using punch cards. Hardware meant hammers and wrenches. Software didn't mean anything. People still sent telegrams. Life Magazine was still around. Canada still had the death penalty. O.J. Simpson was a hero. The Lord's Prayer was recited in public schools. Nobody thought it was wrong. A new car cost $2500. Hockey cards were a dime a pack--and they came with pink bubble gum covered in powdered sugar. Bobby Orr was the greatest player in the NHL. (Thirty-nine years later he's still the greatest of all time.).
Tags: hockey  Boston  Bruins  1972  Stanley  Cup 
Added: 16th June 2011
Views: 3725
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Posted By: Lava1964
Was Butch Cassidy Really Killed In a scene immortalized by Hollywood in the 1969 film Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (played by Paul Newman and Robert Redford), the two outlaws run into a hail of bullets after being cornered by Bolivian troops sometime around 1908. There have always been doubters as to the truth of the twosome's supposed violent end. No solid proof of such a shootout has ever been obtained. Instead, Cassidy is said to have fled to France where he had surgery on his face before sneaking back into the U.S. Furthermore, according to the same account, he lived out his final days quietly and anonymously in Washington State – and wrote an autobiography which he disguised as a biography. In 2011, American rare book expert Brent Ashworth and author Larry Pointer obtained a 200-page manuscript from 1934 called Bandit Invincible: The Story of Butch Cassidy written by a William T. Phillips which they claim was actually written by Cassidy. They claim the book is Cassidy’s own story of his life as an outlaw. It describes how after surviving the shootout in Bolivia he went to Paris and had his face altered then went back to the U.S. and reunited with an old girlfriend, Gertrude Livesay. The authors say they married in Michigan in 1908 and moved to Spokane in Washington state in 1911. He apparently died in 1937, aged 71. One of Cassidy's 12 siblings claimed she saw Butch alive and well in 1924.
Tags: Butch  Cassisdy  death  survival 
Added: 3rd January 2014
Views: 1506
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Posted By: Lava1964
Spittoons They'd be considered very unhygienic today, but in their day spittoons were actually a step up in public health. Used as a receptacle for spit generated by chewing tobacco, in the late 19th century spittoons became a common sight in pubs, brothels, saloons, hotels, stores, banks, railway carriages, and other places where people--especially adult men--gathered. Although brass was the most common material for spitoons, other materials ranged from basic functional iron to crafted cut glass and fine porcelain. At higher-class hotels, spittoons were often elaborately decorated. Spittoons were flat-bottomed, often weighted to minimize tipping over, and commonly had an interior lip to make spilling less likely even if they did tip over. Occasionally they'd have lids. Some had holes with an accompanying plug, to aid in draining and cleaning. Use of spittoons was considered an advance of public manners and health, intended to replace previously common habit of spitting on floors, streets, and sidewalks. Many jurisdictions passed laws against spitting in public--other than into a spittoon. Boy Scout troops organized campaigns to paint "Do not Spit on the Sidewalk" notices on city sidewalks. In 1909, Cincinnati scout troops allied with members of the Anti-Tuberculosis League painted thousands of such messages in a single night. A punny mass-produced sign common in saloons read: 'If you expect to rate as a gentleman, do not expectorate on the floor.' Spittoons were also useful for people suffering from tuberculosis who would cough up phlegm. Public spittoons would sometimes contain a solution of an antiseptic such as carbolic acid with the aim of limiting transmission of disease. With the start of the 20th century, medical doctors urged tuberculosis sufferers to use personal pocket spittoons instead of public ones; these were jars with tight lids which people could carry. After the deadly 1918 flu epidemic, both hygiene and etiquette advocates began to disparage public use of the spittoon, and use began to decline. Chewing gum replaced tobacco as the favorite chew of the younger generation. Cigarettes were considered more hygienic than spit-inducing chewing tobacco. While it was still not unusual to see spittoons in some public places as late as the 1930s, vast numbers of old brass spittoons met their ends when they were melted down during the scrap metal drives of the Second World War.
Tags: spittoons  hygiene  tobacco 
Added: 17th July 2012
Views: 4072
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Posted By: Lava1964
WWII: Massacre at Oradour-Sur-Glane On June 10, 1944, four days after the Allied D-Day landings in Normandy, German SS troops descended on a small, peaceful French village, Oradour-Sur-Glane, in which about 700 people lived. In a matter of a few hours, Oradour-Sur-Glane ceased to exist. Virtually every person who lived there was indiscriminately shot or burned alive. Every building was also destroyed. After the war, the French government decided to leave Oradour-Sur-Glane's ruins as they stood as a solemn reminder of the horrors of war.
Tags: Second  World  War  massacre  Oradour-Sur  Glane 
Added: 7th November 2012
Views: 3883
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Posted By: Lava1964
F Troop-Full Episode-- The Phantom Major Politically incorrect and as funny as it gets!
Tags: F  Troop-Full  Episode--  The  Phantom  Major  Forrest  Tucker  Larry  Storch  Ken  Berry  Melody  Patterson  Frank  Dekova  James  Hampton  Bob  Steele  Joe  Brooks 
Added: 22nd January 2013
Views: 2024
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Posted By: Steve
Bell Canada Dieppe Commercial I might as well post the best Canadian commercial ever made: a Bell Canada spot that aired in the 1990s. A young man surprises his grandfather back home in Canada by phoning him from Dieppe. (It might need some explaining to non-Canadians unfamiliar with the Dieppe Raid during the Second World War. Nearly two full years before D-Day, on August 19, 1942, more than 6,000 Allied troops--the vast majority Canadian--were sent on an ill-conceived mission across the English Channel to the French coastal city of Dieppe. They landed on a beach with high tides, baseball-sized rocks that inhibited vehicles, and high cliffs heavily fortified by German machine guns. Their mission was to destroy enemy defenses and communications. It was an unmitigated disaster. Of the 6,086 troops who landed, 3,623 were either killed or captured. Historians argue about the raid's value to this day. Some claim it was a total waste of human life. Others say the costly lessons of Dieppe led to the successful Allied amphibious landings later in the war in North Africa and Normandy.)
Tags: Bell  Canada  Dieppe  commercial 
Added: 6th July 2013
Views: 2043
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Posted By: Lava1964

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