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The New Monkees - 1987 Sitcom Flop The original sitcom The Monkees aired on NBC for two seasons (1966 to 1968). Along with winning an Emmy for best sitcom of 1966, the original Monkees were responsible for several top 40 hit songs, including I'm a Believer, Last Train to Clarksville, and Pleasant Valley Sunday. A very successful nostalgic twentieth anniversary reunion tour by the group in 1986 wrongly convinced some folks in the syndicated TV world that the time was ripe for a second Monkees series to be produced for a new generation. It was a spectacular failure. Like the first Monkees series, extensive tryouts were held to find four actors to play the roles. Unlike the first series, only actors with proven musical abilities were considered. In the end the four main cast members of The New Monkees were Marty Ross, Dino Kovas, Larry Saltis, and Jared Chandler. On the show, the band lived in a large mansion with a butler named Manford (played by Gordon Oas-Heim). The mansion had numerous unexplored rooms and was the main source of the lads' adventures. Instead of a normal kitchen and dining room, the house featured a full diner with a waitress named Rita (played by former exercise instructor Bess Motta of 20 Minute Workout fame). Also present in the mansion was a talking computer called Helen (voiced by Lynnie Godfrey) who used to work for the Defense Department but found that she preferred rock music over missiles. The plots routinely forced the audience to suspend reality. One episode had Larry falling asleep on a copy machine--resulting in numerous Larry clones creating chaos throughout the mansion. Neither sitcom nor music fans ever took to the show nor to the lone album the group produced. Disappointing ratings caused the show to be cancelled after just 13 episodes even though 22 episodes were scheduled to be produced for the first season. Mickey Dolenz, the drummer in the original group, said he wasn't at all surprised The New Monkees bombed. Invoking a Star Trek analogy, Dolenz likened it to "giving another actor pointy ears and expecting viewers to accept him as Mr. Spock." Moreover, the four original Monkees sued Columbia Television Pictures for using the group's name. The case was settled out of court. Bit of trivia: Russell Johnson (most famous for playing the role of the Professor on Gilligan's Island) was the only person to appear on both Monkees series. The New Monkees has never been made available on DVD.
Tags: New  Monkees  sitcom  flop 
Added: 9th November 2015
Views: 1546
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Shirley Temple First On-Screen Kiss The 1942 comedy Miss Annie Rooney was a bit of a dud. Fourteen-year-old Shirley Temple plays the title character--a girl from the wrong side of the tracks who becomes the romantic interest of wealthy Marty White (played by Our Gang alumnus Dickie Moore). The flick is remembered by movie and trivia buffs for one awkward scene in which Shirley is romantically kissed for the first time in her storied movie career. Dozens of news photographers were present to record the "end of innocence" moment for posterity. As you will see, it wasn't much of a kiss. Decades later Moore--who was utterly terrified to be the first actor to woo Shirley--described the kiss as "tepid" and "pathetic". It was the first time Moore, who was 16, had ever kissed a girl either on-screen or off-screen.
Tags: Shirley  Temple  Dickie  Moore  Miss  Annie  Rooney  kiss 
Added: 1st June 2017
Views: 1532
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1970s Sitcom Flop - Sugar Time Here's a short-lived sitcom from the 1970s that, if it's remembered at all, it's mostly recalled by teenage boys. Sugar Time aired on ABC for just 13 episodes in the 1977-78 season. The show revolved around three attractive young ladies who formed a musical group called Sugar, but also held regular jobs. The threesome tried to break into the singing business by working free of charge at a local nightclub. The show's stars were Barbi Benton (as Maxx), Marianne Black (as Maggie), and Didi Carr (as Diane). Four episodes were aired in the summer of 1977. According to the reference book Total Television, the remaining nine episodes were scattered "irregularly thereafter." This is the opening montage. (An odd snippet of trivia: Didi Carr did very little acting after Sugar Time was cancelled in May 1978. She married a rabbi in 1984--and apparently is still wed to him--but she became a staunch atheist! That must be awkward!)
Tags: Sugar  Time  sitcom  flop   
Added: 21st June 2017
Views: 1297
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
First Name of Lt Columbo During the long run that Peter Falk's beloved Columbo detective mysteries had on both NBC and ABC, Lt. Columbo's name was supposedly never revealed. In one episode, Columbo is asked if he has a first name. The detective coyly replied, "Only my wife uses it." However, Columbo's name was revealed in two NBC episodes via quick glances at his LAPD ID. In both Dead Weight and A Matter of Honor, Columbo's ID is shown onscreen just long enough for eagle-eyed viewers to see that it his first name is Frank. However, many trivia buffs wrongly believe Columbo's first name was Phillip. Why? Despite having zero evidence to back up his assertion, Fred L. Worth, the author of a trivia book, wrote that Columbo's first name was Phillip. This factoid was seized upon by the creators of Trivia Pursuit--and it appeared as a question in the first edition of the game. Worth attempted to sue the Trivial Pursuit people for copyright violation, but facts--even bogus ones--are not protected by copyright.
Tags: Columbo  first  name  Frank 
Added: 25th November 2017
Views: 1196
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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