Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Gladys Knight and The Pips - If I Were Your Woman Tags: Gladys  Knight  and  The  Pips  -  If  I  Were  Your  Woman  The  Ed  Sullivan  Show  1971    live    Motown    soul     
Added: 11th May 2010
Views: 4187
Rating:
Posted By: Music Maiden
The Terror of Tiny Town One of Hollywood's true curiosities was The Terror of Tiny Town (1938)--an all-midget musical western! The cowboys ride Shetland ponies and enter the saloon by walking under its swinging doors! Many of the cast members would also play Munchkins in The Wizard of Oz in 1939.
Tags: movie  midget  western  Terror  of  Tiny  Town 
Added: 30th May 2010
Views: 1448
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Carnegie Libraries Andrew Carnegie made a vast fortune in the steel industry. His philosophy was that a man should spend half his life acquiring wealth and the other half using it for good works. Accordingly, Carnegie financed the building of the astonishing total of 2,509 public libraries in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, and other countries. Carnegie's passion for libraries began at a young age. He saw the value of public libraries as places for learning and community centers. Cities or towns that wanted a Carnegie Library had to provide the building site and maintain the library after it was built. Carnegie's money paid for everything else. A carnegie library always had to have 'open stacks' so the public could browse, and it had to provide free service. Carnegie's foundation built libraries from 1885 to 1929. (Carnegie himself died in 1919 at age 84.) Many of these libraries are still in use today, such as the one pictured here in Grass Valley, California.
Tags: Andrew  Carnegie  libraries  philanthropy 
Added: 18th June 2010
Views: 1377
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bob Probert passed away yesterday. Bob Probert played for the Detroit Red Wings in the late 80's early 90's. He was as they say an Enforcer on the ice. The Red Wings were just coming out of a 20 something year funk. He protected Steve Yezzerman and the others on his team. Only in Hockey can you do this, They sure loved here in The Motor City or I should say Hockeytown. 45 years old, very young. He was on his boat on Lake St Clair with his family when he collapsed. R.I.P Bob!
Tags: Bob  Probert  former  Detroit  Red  Wing 
Added: 6th July 2010
Views: 1332
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
Carol Burnett Carol sings Love's The Only Game In Town from the film Pete N Tilly.
Tags: Carol  Burnett  Pete  N  Tilly 
Added: 25th July 2010
Views: 1046
Rating:
Posted By: CarolBurnettFan1
1903 World Series Scorecard In days gone by, all serious baseball fans used to manually keep a batter-by-batter record of ballgames on scorecards. (Some of us still do, although the custom appears to be dying out.) For the first modern World Series in 1903, the Third Base Saloon in Boston sold their own version to fans heading to the Huntington Avenue Base Ball Grounds to watch the American League champion Boston Pilgrims battle the National League champion Pittsburgh Pirates. Although the 10-cent price of this scorecard seems ridiculously cheap by today's standards, it was double the cost of what scorecards normally sold for at the ballpark during the regular season. However, it was five cents cheaper than the 15-cent pricetag the Pilgrims had affixed to the World Series scorecards sold by their vendors. The Boston Globe editorialized the hometown club was 'squeezing the dear public.'
Tags: World  Series  1903  scorecard 
Added: 30th October 2010
Views: 1421
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1916 New Jersey Shark Attacks During an 11-day period during a 1916 heatwave, five people were attacked by sharks along the coast of New Jersey. Only one victim survived. These well chronicled events inspired Peter Benchley's famous novel Jaws. The first attack occurred on Saturday, July 1 at Beach Haven, a resort town off New Jersey's southern coast. Charles Epting Vansant, 25, of Philadelphia was vacationing at the Engleside Hotel. Before dinner, Vansant decided to take a quick swim in the Atlantic. Shortly after entering the water, Vansant began shouting. He was rescued by lifeguard Alexander Ott who pulled the bleeding Vansant from the water. Vansant's left thigh had been stripped of its flesh. He bled to death on the hotel manager's desk. The second attack occurred 45 miles north of Beach Haven at the resort town of Spring Lake, New Jersey. The victim was Charles Bruder, 27, a hotel bellhop. Bruder was killed on Thursday, July 6, 1916, while swimming 130 yards from shore. A shark bit him in the abdomen and severed his legs. Lifeguards Chris Anderson and George White pulled Bruder into their canoe but he bled to death before they reached the shore. The next two attacks occurred on Wednesday, July 12. They shockingly took place in fresh water in Matawan Creek near the town of Matawan, 30 miles north of Spring Lake and 16 miles inland! Around 2 p.m. some local boys, including Lester Stillwell, 11, were playing in the creek at an area called the Wyckoff Dock. A dorsal fin appeared and the boys realized it was a shark. Before Stillwell could leave the creek, the shark pulled him underwater. Stillwell's friends ran to town for help. Several men, including local businessman Watson Stanley Fisher, 24, came to investigate. Fisher jumped into the creek to find Stillwell's body, but he too was attacked by the shark in front of several horrified witnesses. Fisher was pulled from the creek without recovering Stillwell's body. His right thigh was severely injured and he bled to death at Monmouth Memorial Hospital in Long Branch. Stillwell's body was recovered 150 feet upstream from the Wyckoff Dock on July 14. The fifth and final victim, Joseph Dunn, 14, of New York City was attacked a half mile from the Wyckoff Dock nearly 30 minutes after the attacks on Stillwell and Fisher. The shark bit his left leg, but Dunn was rescued by his brother and a friend after a vicious tug-of-war with the shark. Dunn was taken to Saint Peter's University Hospital in New Brunswick. Dunn lost his leg, but otherwise recovered. There is some debate whether just one shark was responsible for all five attacks. However, there were no further attacks after a shark, that was found to have human bones in its stomach, was killed. What prompted the rash of attacks in 1916? One grisly theory is that Atlantic sharks had grown accustomed to feeding on humans after German submarine attacks.
Tags: shark  attacks  New  Jersey 
Added: 7th December 2010
Views: 4403
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Oorang Indians The Oorang Indians were a travelling team in the National Football League from LaRue, Ohio (near Marion). The team was named after the Oorang dog kennels. It was basically a novelty team put together by the kennels' owner, Walter Lingo, for marketing purposes. All the players were Native Americans, with Jim Thorpe as its star. The Indians played the 1922 and 1923 NFL seasons. Of the 20 games they played over those two seasons, only one was played at 'home' in nearby Marion, OH. Only four games were won by the team. With a population well under 1,000 people, LaRue is easily the smallest town ever to have been the home of an NFL franchise. The Indians were the first NFL team to have a halftime show. (It featured the kennels' dogs.) The team's owner was not too concerned about fielding a competitive squad--and it showed. Discipline was lax on road trips and the players routinely engaged in heavy drinking binges at speakeasies. In one famous incident in St. Louis, the Indians commandeered a trolley car to get them back to their hotel. Since the trolley was headed in the wrong direction, the players simply lifted it, and turned it around on the tracks.
Tags: football  Oorang  Indians  NFL 
Added: 22nd January 2011
Views: 1385
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Speedy Gonzales Deemed Politically Incorrect Speedy Gonzales, the cunning cartoon Mexican mouse that could run at blazing speeds, was first introduced by Warner Bros. in 1953. (Mel Blanc provided Speedy's voice.) By 1999, however, the Cartoon Network ceased to air Speedy Gonzales. In an interview with Fox News on March 28, 2002, Cartoon Network spokeswoman Laurie Goldberg commented, 'It hasn't been on the air for years because of its ethnic stereotypes.' This is widely believed to refer to Speedy's fellow mice, who are all shown as being very slow and lazy, and sometimes even appear intoxicated. This is particularly true of Speedy's cousin, Slowpoke Rodriguez, who is exceptionally slow and lazy. In one cartoon, titled Gonzales' Tamales, the town mice instigate a feud between Speedy and Sylvester the Cat because Speedy has been stealing the hearts of all the females. Much of the dialogue between Mexican characters is in English and the small amount of Spanish that peppers the dialogue consists of basic greetings, goodbyes, exclamations, and misplaced references to popular Mexican foods. Criticism prompted the Cartoon Network to largely shelve Speedy's films when it gained exclusive rights to broadcast them in 1999. However, fan campaigns to put Speedy back on the air and lobbying by the League of United Latin American Citizens saw the shorts return to air in 2002. Ironically Speedy Gonzales remains a very popular character in Latin America. In Mexico, Speedy Gonzales cartoons have been part of the regular programing of Televisa's Canal 5 national channel ever since it was created. In 2010, a Looney Tunes New Year's Day marathon on the Cartoon Network showed the episode 'Mexican Boarders' featuring both Speedy and Slowpoke. On the Looney Tunes Golden Collection, the Speedy cartoons are prefaced by a disclaimer that states: 'The cartoons you are about to see are products of their time. They may depict some of the ethnic and racial prejudices that were commonplace in American society. These depictions were wrong then and are wrong today. While the following does not represent the WB view of society, these cartoons are being presented as they were originally created, because to do otherwise would be the same as to claim these prejudices never existed.'
Tags: cartoons  Speedy  Gonzales  racism 
Added: 29th January 2011
Views: 3455
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1958 New Jersey Commuter Train Disaster On Sept. 15, 1958, a horrible accident befell a commuter train shuttling passengers from New Jersey to New York City. It was a Tuesday morning after rush hour so the train had only 100 passengers--about a quarter of its capacity. Shortly following 10 a.m., Central Railroad train No. 3314 out of Bayhead stopped at Elizabethport on the western shore of Newark Bay. The train plunged off the end of an open bridge, killing 48 passengers, including a high executive from one of the larger corporations in the country and retired New York Yankees second baseman George (Snuffy) Stirnweiss. Other passengers included an investment banker carrying a brief case that contained $250,000 in negotiable bonds, a federal agent carrying a top secret device for communicating with satellites, and the mayor of a town in southern New Jersey. The accident occurred when the train plunged off the end of a bridge that had opened to allow a boat to pass on Newark Bay. Questions still remain about the accident, and why the crew ignored at least three warnings to stop and arrived at the edge of the bridge at exactly the wrong moment - sending three cars into the turbulent waters below. Although some reports suggest that the train engineer, Lloyd Wilburn, 63, suffered a heart attack before drowning as a result of the crash, the investigation later showed his train moved well above the 22-mile-per-hour speed limit for the bridge and passed through three signals notifying him and other crew members that the bridge was open ahead.
Tags: bridge  train  disaster  New  Jersey 
Added: 30th January 2011
Views: 4873
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 7 8 9 10 11 12 [13] 14 15 16 17 18 of 18 | Random