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1964 Fashions and Cars Frothy souffle textures revved up in shades of gold will get the attention of that Big Wheel in your life, according to this 1964 ad from the August Seventeen magazine. And it looks like the British Motor Corporation is willing to take that risk! And there is Ford Model Agency's model Colleen Corby in blue, wearing one of the vervy, vivid trio of sweaters to prove it! The guy double parked next to her doesn't stand a chance. Sigh. Such was the summer of '64.
Tags: fashions  cars  Sixties  ColleenCorby  SeventeenMagazine  VintageMagazines  1964Fashions  BritishMotorCorporation  FordModelAgency   
Added: 25th June 2011
Views: 2288
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Posted By: AngoraSox
1963 Teens In The News What? Look at that skinny kid named Steve Spielberg. If only he had tried a little harder he could have made something of himself. LOL And we all know that 16-year-old pianist Andre Watts made musical history right out the gate! Amazingly, 14-year-old Francine Fox earned an Olympic silver medal one year later in Women's Kayak Doubles! At the 1964 Olympic Summer games in Tokyo, Francine Fox and Gloria Perrier paddled to a silver medal, trailing a German pair by two seconds. The pairing was interesting for the disparity in ages, as, in 1964, Fox was a 15-year-old high school student, while Perrier was 20 years older. I couldn't find the other teen in the news singer Nancy Hawk in Google, but these vintage Seventeen magazines have lots of fun surprises to offer!
Tags: 1963  SeventeenMagazine  SteveSpielberg  film  movies  Hollywood  AndreWatts  music  FrancineFox  sports  Olympics  teenagers  NancyHawk  MilitaryDefenseDept 
Added: 13th July 2011
Views: 2493
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Posted By: AngoraSox
Bad News Bears - Sitcom Flop 1979 Successful movies don't often spawn successful TV series. Take the Bad News Bears, for instance. In the television version, Jack Warden portrayed former minor-leaguer Morris Buttermaker, the coach of the Hoover Junior High Bears, a sorry bunch of youthful misfits and bumblers. Catherine Hicks played Hoover Junior High principal Dr. Emily Rappant. Phillip Richard Allen played Roy Turner, the coach of the dreaded rival Lions. Corey Feldman, Billy Jayne (then credited as Billy Jacoby) and Meeno Peluce were cast amongst the team's players, and Tricia Cast played Amanda Wurlitzer, the Bears' star pitcher. Poor writing and subpar acting doomed this series. Three episodes into the series' second season, CBS cancelled The Bad News Bears due to low ratings. A few previously unaired episodes were shown during the summer of 1980.
Tags: sitcom  Bad  News  Bears  CBS  baseball 
Added: 23rd August 2011
Views: 1802
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Posted By: Lava1964
1964 Summer at Seventeen Popular Sixties fashion model Colleen Corby graces the cover of the July issue of Seventeen magazine. From Shakespeare to pancakes, 1960's teens could be inspired by anything to throw a party!
Tags: 1964  teens  fashions  parties  SeventeenMagazine  ColleenCorby  summer   
Added: 1st September 2011
Views: 6945
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Posted By: AngoraSox
Death of Salvador Sanchez - 1982 Boixing lost a terrific champion way too early in the summer of 1982. Salvador Sánchez of Mexico was well on his way to becoming the greatest featherwight boxer of all time. Sánchez was 44-1-1 in 46 career fights. He had upset popular Danny (Little Red ) Lopez in February 1980 to win the WBC version of the 126-pound title. He went on to defend it numerous times in the next 30 months. Sánchez was a skilled boxer/puncher who could wear down an opponent with accurate, sharp, stinging blows. He was, not surprisingly, a national hero in Mexico. Sadly Sánchez was killed in a sngle-car crash in Mexico on August 12, 1982. He was just 23 years old. At the time he was training for a rematch with the tough Juan Laporte. Sánchez had beaten Laporte in December 1980. Sánchez's last fight was a skillful 15-round knockout of Azumah Nelson in New York City's Madison Square Garden about three weeks before the fatal car accident. Sánchez crashed on the early morning while driving his Porsche 928 sports car along the Mexican federal highway from Santiago de Querétaro to San Luis Potosí, dying instantly. Sánchez was posthumously inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1991.
Tags: boxing  Salvador  Sanchez 
Added: 14th May 2012
Views: 6874
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Posted By: Lava1964
Stella Walsh and Helen Stephens About four years ago I made a post about the gender controversy surrounding Stella Walsh, a Polish-born sprinter who competed at both the 1932 and 1936 Summer Olympics. Only after 'her' 1980 death was it discovered that Walsh was actually a male. Walsh's great rival at the 1936 Berlin Games was American Helen Stephens (shown on the left in this photo). Stephens passed her gender test and won the gold medal in the women's 100 meters.
Tags: gender  controversy  Helen  Stephens  Stella  Walsh 
Added: 15th May 2012
Views: 2566
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Posted By: Lava1964
Donna Summer Passes at age 63 TMZ is reporting the Queen of Disco has passed at the age of 63. It is reported she was battling cancer, a closely guarded secret to the public.
Tags: Donna  Summer  Queen  of  Disco,  TMZ,   
Added: 17th May 2012
Views: 1037
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Posted By: Old Fart
Donna Summer Donna Summer God Bless her. She was Hot Stuff.
Tags: Donna  Summer  Hot  Stuff  Disco  Icon 
Added: 17th May 2012
Views: 1698
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Posted By: Marty6697
1991 - Summer Time at the Gateway Arch Summer in St. Louis at the Gateway Arch, St. Louis, Missouri, 1991
Tags: St  Louis  Missouri  Arch  Jefferson  National  Expansion  Memorial  1991 
Added: 28th May 2012
Views: 1332
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Posted By: poundsdwayne47
1956 USSR-Hungary Water Polo Match At the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, a water polo match between Hungary and the USSR turned into a blood bath--literally. The match, on December 6, was set against the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and saw Hungary defeat the USSR 4–0. The lasting image of the match was Hungarian star Ervin Zádor emerging from the pool with a large, bloody gash under his eye. He had been punched by Soviet player Valentin Prokopov. Tensions were already high between the Hungarian and Soviet water polo teams, as the Soviets had taken advantage of their political control of Hungary to study and copy the training methods and tactics of the 1952 Olympic champion Hungarians. On October 23, 1956, a demonstration by university students escalated into an uprising against the Soviet puppet government in Budapest. For a few days it appeared Hungary might free itself from the USSR's grasp. On November 1, however, Soviet tanks began rolling into Hungary. From November 4 to November 10 forces began suppressing the uprising with air strikes, artillery bombardments, and tank/infantry actions. The Hungarian water polo team was in a mountain training camp above Budapest. They were able to hear the gunfire and see smoke rising. With the Summer Olympics in Melbourne a month away, they were moved to Czechoslovakia to avoid being caught in the revolution. The players only learned the full extent of the uprising and the subsequent crackdown after arriving in Australia. By the start of the Olympics, the uprising had been suppressed. Many players saw the Olympics as a way to salvage national pride. "We felt we were playing not just for ourselves but for our whole country" said Zádor after the match. The "Blood In The Water" match was played in front of a partisan crowd bolstered with expatriate Hungarians as well as Australians and Americans who detested their Cold War Soviet rivals. Prior to the match, the Hungarians had evolved a strategy to taunt the Russians, whose language they had been forced to study in school. In the words of Zádor: "We had decided to try and make the Russians angry to distract them." From the opening whistle, kicks and punches were freely exchanged. At one point the Hungarian captain, Dezső Gyarmati, punched a Russian; it was caught on film. Meanwhile, Zádor scored two goals for the Hungarians, much to the delight of the crowd. With Hungary leading 4–0 in the final minutes, Zádor was marking Valentin Prokopov with whom he'd had verbal exchanges. Prokopov struck him, causing a gash to open. The blood comining with the water in the pool made it look like Zádor was bleeding to death. As he left the pool, his bleeding incited the crowd into a frenzy. Angry spectators jumped onto the concourse beside the water, shook their fists, shouted abuse, and spat at the Soviets. To avoid a riot, police entered the arena with one minute to go, declared the game over, and shepherded the crowd away. Pictures of Zádor's injuries were published around the world, leading to the "Blood in the Water" name, although reports that the water actually turned red were an exaggeration. Zádor said his only thought was whether he would be able to play the next match. Hungary went on to beat Yugoslavia 2–1 in the final to win their fourth Olympic gold medal. Zádor missed the match. After the event was completed, he and some of his teammates sought asylum in the West, rather than live in Hungary under a puppet pro-Soviet regime.
Tags: Olympics  water  polo  blood 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 3953
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Posted By: Lava1964

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