Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Holmes and Yo-Yo - Sitcom Flop 1976 Holmes & Yo-Yo was a disastrous, far-fetched sitcom that aired on ABC for 13 episodes during the 1976-1977 season. The series followed luckless Detective Alexander Holmes (whose partners always seem to get killed in the line of duty) and his new android partner Yo-Yo, on their adventures and misadventures. Meanwhile Holmes taught Yo-Yo how to be human while trying to keep his quirky partner's true nature a secret. The show was produced by Leonard Stern, a former staff writer for Get Smart--which featured an android character named Hymie who was a prototype for Yo-Yo. Richard B. Shull starred as Detective Holmes. John Schuck starred as his partner Gregory "Yo-Yo" Yoyonivich. Co-stars were Andrea Howard and Bruce Kirby. Jay Leno appeared in the pilot as a gas station attendant! The pilot episode introduced Detective Holmes as a down-on-his-luck veteran cop who constantly injures his partners. The department gives him a new partner, Gregory Yoyonivich. Yo-Yo, as he likes to be called, is good-natured, if a bit clumsy, and also surprisingly strong. During one of their first calls, Yo-Yo is shot and Holmes discovers his new partner is an android--a sophisticated new crime-fighting machine designed by the police department as their secret weapon on crime. "You're not a person!" is Holmes' stunned response. Besides super-strength, Yo-Yo's other abilities were speed reading, and the ability to analyze clues at the scene. Yo-Yo had a built-in Polaroid camera: Each time his nose was pressed, a Polaroid photograph of his view would be taken and ejected from his shirt pocket. Yo-Yo's control panel was built into his chest, which could be opened by pulling his tie. The level of Yo-Yo's batteries was critical, because if they ran down his memory and, effectively, his being would be erased. In one episode his batteries came very close to running down completely, and he was charged by being pushed against an electric fence with his arms extended. Yo-Yo weighed 427 pounds, and his heavy build could absorb the shock of a bomb. Much comedy was derived from Yo-Yo's constant malfunctions. Some of his common problems included uncontrollably spinning head over heels when near an electric garage door that was opening or closing; bullets causing him to break out dancing; magnets flying at him; picking up radio signals from Sweden; and repeating "Bunco Squad, Bunco Squad, Bunco Squad" over and over when his circuits blew. Another running gag involved Yo-Yo's ability to read an entire book by simply fanning its pages; his invariable comment after doing so: "I enjoyed it!" The show premiered in September 1976 and was axed before Christmas.
Tags: Holmes  and  Yo-Yo  sitcom  ABC  flop 
Added: 30th August 2011
Views: 2466
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Speed Skating champ promotes smoking In this dated ad from 1935, Jack Shea, a double gold medallist in speed skating at the 1932 Lake Placid Winter Olympics, says that Camel cigarettes restore his pep.
Tags: Jack  Shea  speed  skater  cigarette  ad 
Added: 3rd September 2011
Views: 1359
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Brittanie Cecil - Hockey Fan Fatality At any high-quality hockey game, pucks flying into the crowd at great speeds are a common occurrence. Injuries to fans occasionally happen. Only once in the long history of the NHL has a spectator been killed as a result of being struck by a puck. The victim was Brittanie Cecil, who ironically had been given her ticket to the game as an early 14th birthday present. Brittanie, an athletic girl from West Alexandria, OH, was watching the Columbus Blue Jackets play the Calgary Flames at Columbus' Nationwide Arena on March 16, 2002. A slapshot by the Blue Jackets' Espen Knutsen was deflected by the Flames' Derek Morris. It went over the glass behind the net, striking Brittanie in the left temple. Play carried on as the players were unaware of having inadvertently caused any serious injury. Although Brittanie had suffered a skull fracture, she walked on her own power to a first-aid station before being taken to Columbus Children's Hospital in an ambulance. Her only visible injury was a gash on her forehead. At the hospital, she suffered an initial seizure and was admitted, but the next day she appeared to be recovering. Brittanie was both communicative and ambulatory, and had no complaints of pain or dizziness. A CT-scan, however, had failed to catch a torn vertebral artery, resulting in severe clotting and swelling of the brain. On March 18, she developed a high fever and lost consciousness. She died nearly 48 hours after being struck, at 5:15 p.m. on March 18, 2002, two days before her 14th birthday. Brittanie's funeral cortege drew a procession of more than 150 cars. Attending the service was Blue Jackets' general manager Doug MacLean who spoke on behalf of the team. Knutsen and Morris, the two players who combined for the fatal slapshot, expressed remorse following Brittanie's death. Morris, who deflected the puck, explained, "You try to say, 'It happens all the time,' but you can't. I don't know how many times pucks get deflected over the glass, but it doesn't make it any better. You can always say, 'It's not my fault,' but you always feel like it is, a little." Knutsen was given the option of sitting out the next game by Blue Jackets coach Dave King. He chose to play, telling reporters, "I think about it all the time. It was a terrible accident, and I cannot get it off my mind." Knutsen was so shaken by what had happened that he could not handle meeting Brittanie's family until 2010--eight years after the accident. The following season, the NHL mandated that safety netting be installed in every arena to protect spectators seated behind the goal nets. This move was initially greeted with hostility by longtime hockey fans who didn't want their view of games obstructed and who further perceived the netting as an overreaction to a freak accident.
Tags: accident  hockey  fan  puck  Brittanie  Cecil 
Added: 6th April 2012
Views: 1760
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Ford Shelby commercial GT500 Awesome muscle car hitting the Autobahn. Looks like fun!
Tags: Ford  Shelby  Autobahn    No  speed  limit 
Added: 11th May 2012
Views: 1316
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
1994 Aeroflot Plane Crash Scandal One of the strangest--and most preventable--air disasters in history was Aeroflot Flight #593. On March 23, 1994 a Russian International Airlines Airbus A310-300 crashed into a hillside of the Kuznetsk Alatau mountain range, Kemerovo Oblast. The jet was en route from Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport to Hong Kong's Kai Tak International Airport with 75 occupants aboard, of whom 63 were passengers. Most of the passengers were businessmen from Hong Kong and Taiwan who were seeking economic opportunities in Russia. There were no survivors. No evidence of technical malfunction was found, but cockpit voice and flight data recorders revealed the bizarre reason for the crash: The 12-year-old daughter (Yana) and 16-year-old son (Eldar) of pilot Yaroslav Kudrinsky were present on the flight deck. Eldar apparently had unknowingly disabled the autopilot's control of the aircraft's ailerons while seated at the controls! Yana was also recorded saying, "Daddy, can I turn this?" The aircraft had then rolled into a steep bank and near-vertical dive from which the pilots were unable to regain control in time to prevent the crash. Unlike Soviet planes with which the crew had been familiar, no audible alarm accompanied the autopilot's partial disconnection. Because of this they remained unaware of what was happening until it was too late. The plane slammed into the hillside at high speed before the crew could return the controls to autopilot. As a job perquisite, Aeroflot pilots, once per year, could take their family members on a flight free of charge and even have them present on the flight deck--but having them sit at the controls was absolutely against regulations.
Tags: Aeroflot  Russian  air  crash  children  at  controls 
Added: 2nd May 2013
Views: 3256
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Theodore Roosevelt - Near Fatal Carriage Accident On September 3, 1902, U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt and several other prominent politicians came within inches of being killed by a speeding trolley car in Pittsfield, MA. The president, riding in a horse-drawn carriage, was on his way to deliver a speech when the accident occurred. The carriage was knocked about 40 feet upon impact. Secret Service agent William Craig was fatally injured, becoming the first Secret Service agent killed in the line of duty. Roosevelt was knocked from the carriage and landed face first upon the street. He suffered superficial wounds to his face and leg. (The seriousness of Roosevelt's injuries was probably understated. Roosevelt's leg wound became infected and abscessed. He required surgery and was confined to a wheelchair for a short time. Although the leg wound healed completely, Roosevelt was bothered by the aftereffects of his injury for the rest of his life.) David J. Pratt, the driver of the carriage containing the president, was severely injured. George B. Cortelyou, Secretary to the President, was severely bruised. Winthrop Murray Crane, Governor of Massachusetts, and George P. Lawrence, Representative in Congress from the First Massachusetts district, escaped with only a few bruises. All were in the carriage with Mr. Roosevelt. A newspaper account said, "Under the sunniest of September skies the distinguished party was driving through the Berkshire Hills in a landau drawn by four white horses, the reins handled by Pratt, the President and his companions going from Dalton to Lenox. The carriage was struck squarely just behind the box on which Pratt and Craig were sitting. The vehicle was hurled 40 feet across the road. Craig was instantly killed and ground under the heavy machinery of the car into an unrecognizable mass. The President was thrown into the air and landed on the right side of his face in the roadway. Mr. Cortelyou was thrown out and almost rendered unconscious. Gov. Crane, who, next to Craig, was the nearest to the immediate danger line, was thrown out, but...escaped with only slight bruises." No one on the trolley was injured. According to reports, the trolley was speeding in an attempt to get to its destination ahead of Roosevelt's carriage. Euclid Madden was the trolley car's motorman. He received a six-month prison term for his role in the accident. James Kelley was the trolley car's conductor. In 2002, on the hundredth anniversary of the accident, the Secret Service held a special ceremony at agent Craig's grave where a marker was placed.
Tags: Theodore  Roosevelt  1902  accident  carriage  trolley 
Added: 16th September 2014
Views: 5039
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Chuck Yeager Breaks Sound Barrier U.S. Air Force Captain Chuck Yeager becomes the first person to fly faster than the speed of sound on October 14, 1947. Because of the secrecy of the project, Bell and Yeager's achievement was not announced until June 1948.
Tags: Chuck  Yeager  Breaks  Sound  Barrier  Bell  X-1  National  Advisory  Committee  for  Aeronautics  NACA    U.S.  Army  Air  Forces  Bell  Aircraft  Glamorous  Glennis 
Added: 14th October 2014
Views: 1297
Rating:
Posted By: Cliffy
Bat-Throwing Incident- 1972 ALCS During the first two games of the 1972 American League Championship Series, Oakland's Bert Campaneris was the best player on the field. With Oakland having defeated Detroit in the first game and leading 5-0 in the seventh inning of the second game, Detroit manager Billy Martin ordered relief pitcher Lerrin LaGrow to throw a pitch at the speedy Campaneris' ankles. As this clip shows, Campaneris reacted by throwing his bat at LaGrow! Both players were ejected and suspended for the rest of the ALCS.
Tags: MLB  1972  ALCS  Campaneris  LaGrow  incident  bat 
Added: 29th October 2014
Views: 1490
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
 Lady Schick Speed Styler Commercial Tags:   Lady  Schick  Speed  Styler  Commercial  Farrah  Fawcett  Angela  Cartwright  style  hair  curly  hair  straight  hair 
Added: 30th January 2015
Views: 1380
Rating:
Posted By: Cathy
Postmortem Photography It seems a little bit creepy today--well, actually it seems extremely creepy by modern standards--but it was quite common in the late 19th century to photograph your loved ones in lifelike poses after they had died! Photography was generally very expensive in the 19th century. Often families had no photographs of loved ones while they were alive. Accordingly, as part of a funeral ritual, the recently deceased person would be dressed, posed in a very lifelike position--much like the gentleman in this example--and his/her image was preserved for posterity. Frequently they were posed alongside siblings and parents as part of a family portrait. Because of the slow shutter speed of cameras in those days, dead people were actually the best subjects for photographers as they were guaranteed to stay still. Postmortem photography was surprisingly commonplace in Europe and North America (especially of dead children because childhood mortality rates were very high). It remained quite common until photography became cheaper and families were more likely to have photos of their relatives taken while they were still in the land of the living.
Tags: postmortem  photography 
Added: 9th March 2015
Views: 1120
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 of 5 | Random