Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Pickles the Pooch Finds Stolen World Cup The Jules Rimet Trophy--more commonly known as soccer's World Cup--was stolen on March 20, 1966. It was snatched from a glass display case at Methodist Central Hall in the Westminster section of London, England when the security guard assigned to keep an eye on it was temporarily absent from his post. England was going to host the quadrennial soccer tourney in three months--and the theft was a huge embarrassment for the country's Football Association. Shortly thereafter Joe Mears, the president of the F.A., received a parcel containing part of the World Cup. It was accompanied by a ransom note from a man calling himself Jackson. It demanded 15,000 British pounds in small denominations or else he would melt down the golden symbol of soccer supremacy. Mears contacted the police who arranged for a detective named Len Buggy to act on behalf of the ailing Mears who suffered from heart trouble. Buggy agreed to meet Jackson at London's Battersea Park at a specified time. Buggy brought a briefcase containing only about 500 pounds but Jackson did not bother to count it. Instead he got into Buggy's car and instructed him to drive aimlessly around London for 10 minutes. Jackson noticed a police van tailing the car. He panicked and attempted to escape on foot. He was quickly apprehended and identified as Edward Betchley, a 46-year-old army veteran. He claimed to be acting as a middle-man for a mysterious fellow he called The Pole. Betchley was the only man who was ever arrested in connection with the crime. He served two years in prison and died shortly thereafter of emphysema in 1969. The World Cup was missing for a week until David Corbett took Pickles--his mongrel dog--for a walk in the Norwich section of London on March 27. Pickles was drawn to a bundle tightly wrapped in newspaper lying near a parked car. Corbett removed the newspaper and there was the World Cup! Corbett immediately contacted police--who promptly interrogated him as a possible suspect. They finally let him go at 2:30 a.m. for lack of evidence. Pickles became a celebrity pooch. He was named Dog of the Year, was awarded a year's supply of dog food, appeared on several British TV shows, and had a feature role in a movie. Pickles was also invited to appear on TV programs in Chile, Yugoslavia and Brazil, but Corbett declined the offers as they would have required Pickles to go through strict quarantine measures and get several vaccinations to travel abroad. Corbett estimates that Pickles earned him 3000 pounds--money he put toward the purchase of a new house. When England won the World Cup on July 30, Pickles was invited to attend the team's private post-match victory party--a gathering so exclusive that even the players' wives were barred by the F.A.! Sadly Pickles accidentally suffocated in 1967 when his choke leash became entangled in a tree.
Tags: Pickles  dog  stolen  World  Cup  soccer 
Added: 19th February 2016
Views: 2475
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1916 Booby Quarter By the 1910s the Art Nouveau movement was influencing the designs of American coinage. In 1916 designer Hermon McNeil created what he thought was an attractive portrait of Lady Liberty for the new silver 25-cent piece. No red flags were raised as the design received official approval for mintage in late 1916 for distribution in January 1917. Instead of winning applause, however, the coin caused outrage because the Standing Liberty figure (as it is known to collectors) has her right breast exposed. Moralists decried the image as obscene and decadent. The public's response was so swift and negative that the Treasury Department modified the die for future strikes to cover the exposed breast with armor--even doing so without the official approval of Congress. Furthermore, the federal government did its best to recall the original allotment of 52,000 coins. That was easier said than done. First, any new coin is largely hoarded by collectors for its novelty. Second, the small mintage of these coins enhanced their desirability among collectors. Third, the infamy attached to this coin made it even more collectible than usual. Therefore most of the 1916 "booby quarters" did not stay in circulation very long before they were stashed away by average citizens as curiosity pieces (and perhaps erotic souvenirs). According to the Treasury Department, however, the public's moral outrage had nothing to do with the more modest revised design. It was supposedly symbolic. With war clouds looming, it was thought that Lady Liberty should be shown as fully protected by armor rather than being seen as partially exposed and vulnerable.
Tags: 1916  Standing  Liberty  quarter  breast  numismatics 
Added: 27th October 2016
Views: 2071
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bing Davdison Tragic Death One of Hollywood's lesser known tragedies was the death of small-time actor James (Bing) Davidson, a 25-year-old Nebraskan who fell to his doom in 1965. Davidson, whose screen credits show just three small roles, was in the company of actor Paul Lynde in San Francisco on July 17, 1965. Lynde was well known to be a heavy drinker; he and Davidson had both heavily imbibed that night. At some point of drunkenness at the Drake Hotel, Davidson decided to demonstrate a daredevil stunt--hanging from a balcony by his fingertips. In full view of several horrified onlookers (and police officers who had been summoned), Davidson lost his grip and fell to his death from the eighth floor of the hotel. Lynde was absolved of any blame, but the incident was hushed up for years as the circumstances surrounding it may have derailed Lynde's acting career.
Tags: Bing  Davidson  fall  Paul  Lynde   
Added: 9th July 2017
Views: 9730
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Big John Little John - Sitcom Flop Who recalls this sitcom dud? In the fall of 1976, NBC decided to move away from cartoons and create a sitcom for its Saturday morning audience. It was titled Big John, Little John. The show's premise was that 40-year-old middle school teacher John Martin, while vacationing in Florida, takes a small sip of water from a hidden pool--not realizing it is the fabled Fountain of Youth that Ponce de Leon once hoped to find. The effect was that 40-year-old John would unpredictably descend in age to a 12-year-old...and then return to being an adult again just as unpredictably. (According to the story, had John taken a large drink from the pool, he would have been 12 years old forever!) Herb Edelman played 40-year-old John. Robbie Rist (notorious for his role as Cousin Oliver on the Brady Bunch) played 12-year-old John. Joyce Bulifant played 'their' wife. Only 13 episodes were made. The last first-run episode aired just before Christmas 1976, but reruns were shown until September 1977. Here is the show's opening.
Tags: Big  John  Little  John  sitcom  Robbie  Rist 
Added: 14th July 2017
Views: 1016
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Maureen Connolly - Tragic Tennis Star You can watch tennis for the next hundred years and you'll never witness anyone match the dominance that Maureen (Little Mo) Connolly had at the majors between 1951 and 1954. She entered nine Grand Slam singles events--and won every one. Connolly first took up tennis at the age of 10 at San Diego's public courts. Although she was naturally left-handed, her first coach, Wilbur Folsom, converted Connolly to a right-hander. She became an excellent baseline player who, despite her small 5'5" frame, could strike powerful shots with either her backhand or her forehand. By the time Connolly was 14, she was the junior (under 18) female champion of the United States. She began competing in adult events shortly thereafter. Connolly won Forest Hills (the amateur-era forerunner of the US Open) just before her 17th birthday in 1951. In 1952 Connolly won both Wimbledon and Forest Hills. She didn't enter the French or Australian championships. In 1953, however, Connolly entered all four major championships and took them all, becoming the first female to achieve the calendar Grand Slam--a feat that's only been equaled twice in all the years since. In capturing the Grand Slam, Connolly lost just a single set in the four tourneys (to Susan Chatrier in a quarterfinal match in Paris). Entering the 1953 Wimbledon final, Connolly had only dropped eight games in five matches! At the Australian Championships, Connolly only lost 10 games in six matches before the final! Connolly began 1954 just as strongly. She successfully defended both her French and Wimbledon titles. Sadly, about two weeks after her third successive Wimbledon triumph, Connolly was badly injured in a horseback riding mishap when her horse was spooked by a passing cement truck. Her right leg was so badly fractured that it was nearly amputated. She was not quite 20 years old but her tennis career was over. In her nine Grand Slam singles finals, Connolly dropped just one set--and that was in her first one. Shortly after announcing her retirement from competitive tennis in 1955, Connolly married Norman Brinker, who had been a member of the American equestrian team at the 1952 Olympics. They had two daughters. Connolly was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 1966. She battled the disease for three years before succumbing to it on June 21, 1969. She was just 34 years old.
Tags: tennis  Maureen  Connolly  grand  slam  champion 
Added: 17th September 2017
Views: 1220
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Chris Carmichael After I Love Lucy and the Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour ended in 1960, Lucille Ball took a two-year hiatus from television before returning in The Lucy Show in October 1962. This sitcom--loosely based on the book Life Without George--had Ball playing Lucy Carmichael, the widowed mother of two children who shared a large home in fictitious Danfield, NY with divorced friend Vivan Bagley (Vivian Vance). Bagley had a young son as well, named Sherman. Lucy's late husband had left her a significant trust fund on which to live. However, her banker kept tight control of the estate. Lucy's attractive teenage daughter, Chris, was played by Candy Moore. (Moore's first noteworthy TV appearance came in a 1961 episode of Leave It To Beaver where she played Margie Manners, the pretty daughter of the Cleavers' occasional housekeeper. The plot had Wally smitten with her.) The first Lucy Show episode focused on Lucy badly coping with Chris going on a date with a boy who owns a car. Despite living in the same home as Lucy, Chris appeared in just 39 of the 84 episodes in the sitcom's first three seasons. She only appeared in seven of the 26 episodes in the third season. Nevertheless, Moore was often featured in teen magazines. The Lucy Show was an enormous hit, finishing fourth in the year-end Nielsen ratings in its first season. After the first two seasons, however, Vivian Vance tired of commuting from her home on the east coast to California to do the show. When it became apparent that Vance was going to quit the show after the third season, the entire premise of the sitcom changed. Beginning in the fourth season, Lucy relocated to Los Angeles to be near where Chris was attending college. Also relocating to LA was banker Theodore J. Mooney (Gale Gordon) who, by a remarkable coincidence, had accepted a position at Lucy's new bank. The trust fund was only mentioned in the first episode of Season #4 and Lucy became a secretary at her bank. It was explained that Vivian had remarried and remained in Danfield. Chris was never seen again. (Lucy's son, Jerry, appeared in just two episodes of Season #4 and was written out of the show before Season #5. The plot had Jerry enrolling in a military school.) It was later revealed that CBS wanted to retain Candy Moore on the revised show because of her popularity with young viewers, but Lucy was adamantly opposed. In fact, Lucy threatened to retire over the issue. Moore appeared in nine episodes of the Donna Reed Show and then acted only sporadically thereafter. She did have a small role in Raging Bull in 1980, but Moore's last acting credit came in 1981. According to various sources, Moore, who turned 71 in 2018, became an English teacher at a dramatic school in Los Angeles.
Tags: Candy  Moore  Chris  Carmichael  Lucy  Show 
Added: 7th January 2018
Views: 1230
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Thom McKee - Tic Tac Dough Champ Navy officer Lt. Thom McKee became a game show superstar in 1980 when he won the staggering sum of $312,700 in cash and prizes as a contestant on Tic Tac Dough, a syndicated quiz show. McKee, age 25, appeared in 46 episodes and played 89 games. He defeated 43 opponents and tied 45 games before losing to Erik Kraepeller. In total, McKee answered 353 questions correctly. During his remarkable undefeated/winning streak, his progress was often reported by mainstream news outlets--which was basically unheard of in 1980. McKee's list of prizes included eight cars (as winners on Tic Tac Dough were awarded a new car for every fifth win), three sailboats, 16 vacations (which he was unable to take), numerous other smaller prizes, and $200,000 in cash. McKee's win was especially noteworthy because most American game shows at the time had either limits on prizes or appearances. McKee discovered the fame is fleeting, however. Shortly after his run on Tic Tac Dough ended, McKee appeared on the short-lived reincarnation of To Tell The Truth. Only one of the three panelists was able to identify him as the real Thom McKee. McKee's record-setting winnings were not surpassed until the initial run of Who Wants to be a Millionaire ushered in the era of enormous game show prizes in 1999.
Tags: Thom  McKee  game  show  winner  Tic  Tac  Dough 
Added: 12th January 2018
Views: 1719
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Black Tom Explosion 1916 Even though the United States was neutral nation in 1916, it was still occasionally affected by acts of war. The most notable to happen on land was the Black Tom explosion on July 30, 1916, in Jersey City, NJ. It was an act of sabotage by German agents to destroy American-made munitions that were to be supplied to the Allies in the First World War. Black Tom was originally a man-made island constructed around a large black rock in New York Harbor that was a well-known hazard to naval navigation. It was eventually connected by the Lehigh Valley Railroad to the mainland and was absorbed into Jersey City. It became a major munitions depot even before the war. Shortly after midnight on July 30, 1916, a series of small fires was discovered on the pier. Some guards tried to fight the fires while others fled, fearing an explosion. They had good reason to fear such a calamity as 2 million pounds of explosives and small arms were stored on Black Tom Island awaiting shipment to Czarist Russia. The feared explosion came; actually there were several explosions. The first and biggest occurred at 2:08 a.m. It had the force of an earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale. Flying fragments caused more than $100,000 in damages to the Statue of Liberty on its gown and torch. (To date, the torch has never been reopened to the public.) Windows 25 miles were shattered and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia. Four people were definitely killed by the blast--including an infant. Some sources claim the fatality total was seven. Blame originally was directed at Black Tom Island watchmen who had lit small smudge-pot fires to drive away mosquitoes, but they were quickly absolved of blame when the true nature of the fires showed obvious evidence of arson. German saboteurs were blamed for the incident which caused $20 million in damages. The Leigh Valley Railroad successfully sued the German government after the war but had no success in collecting any compensation until 1953 when the West German government agreed to pay $95 million. The final payment was made in 1979.
Tags: Black  Tom  Explosion  1916  German  sabotage 
Added: 13th January 2018
Views: 1224
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 9 10 11 12 13 14 [15] of 15 | Random