Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Traci Lords Scandal 1986 One of the more salacious scandals of the 1980s involved pornographic movie star Nora Louise Kuzma, better known to skin-flick aficionados as Traci Lords. In July 1986, during a comprehensive federal investigation into the pornography industry, authorities received an anonymous tip: Traci Lords, the hugely popular actress, had just turned 18 years old--meaning her meteoric two-year porn career had begun at the illegal and tender age of 16, perhaps even 15. It was true. Her mother's ex-boyfriend had provided Traci with a fake ID that added more than five years to Lords' age, giving her a November 1962 birthdate instead of May 1968. (Her physical attributes so belied her true age that Lords was also able to illegally obtain a California driver's license and a passport.) Mom's ex arranged some nude modelling gigs for Lords, including photos for Penthouse. Within a short time, Lords was Penthouse's Pet of the Month--an issue that outsold all others in the publication's history. She quickly graduated to hard-core films at a time when the home video market was exploding. Lords appeared in about 80 porn flicks and became enormously popular for her enthusiastic performances. 'I get paid for doing things I like,' Lords told an interviewer. Lords claims she only made 21 films (and earned about $35,000 for her services), but dozens of other movies were created from outtakes and reused footage. According to porn industry insiders, however, Lords was making six movies a month, demanding and getting $1,000 per day from producers (about twice the going rate for hard-core porn actresses at the time). Some sources claim Lords made over $1 million from her XXX-rated movies--and even had video companies give her $10,000 a month and provide her with a furnished apartment and a Mercedes. Before the scandal broke, her movies were outselling her nearest rival's by a 10:1 ratio. One film, 'Traci, I Love You,' was made in Europe a few days after her eighteenth birthday by her own newly formed production company, and is thus the only porno movie of hers that can be legally obtained or viewed in North America. Some of her 'banned' films are still available in Europe where laws and the age of sexual consent vary. (In France, for example, it is illegal for someone under the age of 18 to appear in a pornographic movie, but the film itself is not illegal.) The huge scandal resulted in more stringent age verification for porn participants that still exist today. Because of accusations that producers had lured Lords into the business knowing she was a minor, the entire adult film industry verged on collapse. However, Lords had also fooled the federal government with the same fake I.D. to get a U.S. passport, so prosecution efforts were halted. Suspicion lingers that it was Lords herself who tipped off authorities to her true age in order to increase her fame and eliminate her old films from the marketplace once she began her own production company. Lords, shown here in a 2008 photo, has pursued a career as a 'serious actress' since 1986. She has appeared in various films and TV sitcoms, usually typecast as 'the bad girl.'
Tags: Traci  Lords  scandal  underage  pornography 
Added: 30th September 2009
Views: 14763
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dynamite Magazine Dynamite was a celebrity-oriented publication geared for young teen readers. It was available through Scholastic Book Services. The appeal of the magazine was the large number of posters it usually contained. Often there was no advertising. Robert Hegyes of Welcome Back, Kotter is featured on the cover of this issue from 1977.
Tags: Dynamite  magazine  teen  readers 
Added: 22nd October 2009
Views: 2327
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Checking In - Sitcom Flop 1981 The Jeffersons was a hugely successful spinoff from All in the Family, running for 10 seasons from 1975 to 1985. It also inspired a not-so-successful spinoff: Checking In. On The Jeffersons, Marla Gibbs played Florence Johnston, the sassy, wisecracking maid who regularly exchanged insults with George Jefferson. Her character was so well liked by viewers that CBS figured it would be a smart move to give Gibbs her own series. Accordingly, in episode #154 and #155 of The Jeffersons, a hotel manager was so impressed by Florence that he offered her the job as supervisor of maids at his St. Frederick Hotel. Florence accepted and Checking In was born. It premiered on Thursday, April 9, 1981. Larry Linville (Major Frank Burns from MASH fame) played Lyle Block, the hotel's weasly manager and, naturally, Florence's nemesis. After four weeks, though, Checking In was floundering in the ratings and CBS pulled the plug after the April 30 episode. Smartly, the network had Gibbs return to the Jeffersons' household as their maid. In her return episode, #161, Florence arrives at the Jeffersons' door explaining that the hotel burned down! (Her clothing and hair had traces of soot and fire damage to add credibility to the plot twist!) She had to compete with new maid Carmen to get her old job back. After missing just five shows, Gibbs' Florence character remained on The Jeffersons until the series ended in 1985. Marla Gibbs was nominated for an Emmy as Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series Emmy in for five stright years (1981 through 1985) for her role as Florence Johnston. Gibbs' career accomplishments are even more impressive when one considers she was married at age 13 and had three children by age 20! She still managed to graduate from Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago. A performer in amateur theatricals, Gibbs was working as a customer service agent for United Airlines when she got her role on The Jeffersons. Cautiously, she waited until The Jeffersons was a bonafide hit show before quitting her job at United!
Tags: Marla  Gibbs  checking  In  Jeffersons  sitcom 
Added: 28th August 2011
Views: 2963
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Name This Ambulance Driver This famous American was rejected for service in the First World War because he was underage. Instead he joined the Red Cross and went to France as an ambulance driver. Can you name him?
Tags: name  this  ambluance  driver 
Added: 7th November 2009
Views: 1319
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Boxing Day - Commonwealth Nations From Wiki: Boxing Day was traditionally a day on which the servants had a day off from their duties. Because of this the gentry would eat cold cuts and have a buffet-style feast prepared by the servants in advance. In modern times many families will still follow this tradition by eating a family-style buffet lunch, with cold cuts rather than a full cooked meal. It is a time for family, parlour games and sports in the UK. The traditional recorded celebration of Boxing Day has long included giving money and other gifts to those who were needy and in service positions. The European tradition has been dated to the Middle Ages, but the exact origin is unknown and there are some claims that it goes back to the late Roman/early Christian era; metal boxes were placed outside churches used to collect special offerings tied to the Feast of Saint Stephen. In the United Kingdom it certainly became a custom of the nineteenth century Victorians for tradesmen to collect their "Christmas boxes" or gifts in return for good and reliable service throughout the year on the day after Christmas. However, the exact etymology of the term "Boxing" is unclear, with several competing theories, none of which is definitively true. Another possibility is that the name derives from an old English tradition: in exchange for ensuring that wealthy landowners' Christmases ran smoothly, their servants were allowed to take the 26th off to visit their families. The employers gave each servant a box containing gifts and bonuses (and sometimes leftover food). In addition, around the 1800's, churches opened their alms boxes (boxes where people place monetary donations) and distributed the contents to the poor. The establishment of Boxing Day as a defined public holiday under the legislation that created the UK's Bank Holidays started the separation of 'Boxing Day' from the 'Feast of St Stephen', and today it is almost entirely a secular holiday with a tradition of shopping and post-Christmas sales starting. We invite people who celebrate this holiday to contribute to the information here.
Tags: Boxing  Day  Commonwealth  Nations 
Added: 26th December 2009
Views: 1396
Rating:
Posted By: Admin
End of Western Union Telegrams 2006 On January 27, 2006, Western Union ended more than 150 years of telegram service. Beginning in 1854, the company began transmitting and transcribing telegraphed messages and delivering them to customers across the country. They heyday of the telegram was in the 1920s and 1930s when sending a message by telegraph was cheaper than making a long-distance telephone call. The word 'stop' was commonly used in the text of telegrams to end a sentence instead of a period because it was cheaper to send a four-letter word than a punctuation mark. Telegrams were often used for formal notifications and announcements, such as the one below to inform the recipient that he would share the 1958 Nobel Prize for Medicine/Physiology. During the Second World War, Western Union couriers were feared because they delivered official death notices to the families of servicemen. Eventually technology made telegrams obsolete and anachronistic. Only about 20,000 telegrams were sent in 2005, mostly by companies that were required to send legal notifications. On that final day of service, ten telegrams were delivered. They included a congratulatory message, a sympathy message, and, of course, a handful of messages from people who were trying to make history by sending the final Western Union telegram. Today Western Union exists only as a company that handles money transfers.
Tags: last  telegram  Western  Union  communications 
Added: 9th March 2010
Views: 3536
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Japanese Skull Controversy This odd photograph was published in the May 22, 1944 issue of Life magazine. It shows the girlfriend of an American soldier writing her beau a thank-you note for sending her part of the skull from a dead Japanese soldier. The photo inspired overwhelmingly negative reposnses from Life readers. Furthermore, it was a propaganda bonanza for the Japanese who used it to portray Allied servicemen as barbaric. Indeed, the mistreatment of enemy corpses was outlawed by the Geneva Convention in 1929. The soldier who mailed the partial skull stateside was reprimanded.
Tags: skull  Second  World  War  Japanese 
Added: 1st April 2010
Views: 4777
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Carnegie Libraries Andrew Carnegie made a vast fortune in the steel industry. His philosophy was that a man should spend half his life acquiring wealth and the other half using it for good works. Accordingly, Carnegie financed the building of the astonishing total of 2,509 public libraries in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, and other countries. Carnegie's passion for libraries began at a young age. He saw the value of public libraries as places for learning and community centers. Cities or towns that wanted a Carnegie Library had to provide the building site and maintain the library after it was built. Carnegie's money paid for everything else. A carnegie library always had to have 'open stacks' so the public could browse, and it had to provide free service. Carnegie's foundation built libraries from 1885 to 1929. (Carnegie himself died in 1919 at age 84.) Many of these libraries are still in use today, such as the one pictured here in Grass Valley, California.
Tags: Andrew  Carnegie  libraries  philanthropy 
Added: 18th June 2010
Views: 1346
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Harry Spear - The Lost Rascal Harry Spear was one of the leading men in the Our Gang/Little Rascals comedies in the late silent period of 1927 to 1929. Before joining the popular Our Gang series, Spear appeared in several Buck Jones westerns. Spear's first appearance in an Our Gang comedy was in Chicken Feed when he was five. He became a popular member of the gang, notable for often donning an oversized bowler hat. At the dawn of the sound era, newcomer Jackie Cooper took over the role as the leader/tough guy in the gang, replacing Spear. Spear's final Our Gang film was Bouncing Babies. After departing the series, Spear briefly entered vaudeville, entertaining audiences with a dancing and monologue routine. By the mid-1940s, though, he had left the entertainment industry and had severed all ties with his former Our Gang alumni. Spear's whereabouts after the 1940s remained a mystery for over half a century. However, several diligent Our Gang fans tracked Spear down in 1995. Residing in San Diego, California at the time, Spear (who went by his legal name of Harry Bonner) continually denied being the 'Harry Spear' of Our Gang fame for unknown reasons, despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary. From military service records, it was found that Harry Spear served as a Chief Petty Officer in the US Navy during World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. Spear died of kidney cancer on September 22, 2006 in San Diego at age 85.
Tags: Harry  lost  Spear  Our  Gang  Little  Rascals 
Added: 30th October 2010
Views: 2396
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Harry Truman Assassination Attempt An assassination attempt on President Harry Truman occurred on November 1, 1950. It was perpetrated by two Puerto Rican pro-independence activists, Oscar Collazo and Griselio Torresola. It occurred while Truman was residing at Blair House during extensive White House renovations. The attempt resulted in the deaths of White House police officer Leslie Coffelt, and Torresola. Truman was unharmed. Torresola walked up Pennsylvania Avenue from the west side while his partner, Oscar Collazo, walked up to Capital police officer Donald Birdzell on the steps of Blair House. Approaching Birdzell from behind, Collazo pulled out a handgun, pointed it at the officer's back, and pulled the trigger. Since he had failed to cock it, nothing happened. Collazo managed to fire the weapon just as Birdzell was turning to face him, striking the officer in his right knee. Secret Service agent Floyd Boring and White House police officer Joseph Davidson heard the shot and opened fire on Collazo. Collazo returned fire and soon found himself outgunned as the wounded Birdzell joined the shootout. Soon after, Collazo was struck by two rounds in the head and right arm, while other officers joined the gunfight. Torresola approached a guard booth at the west corner of Blair House where an officer, Private Leslie Coffelt, was sitting inside. Torresola quickly pivoted from left to right around the opening of the booth. Coffelt was taken completely by surprise. Torresola fired four shots from his Luger at close range. Three shots struck Coffelt in the chest and abdomen, a fourth went through his tunic. Coffelt slumped in his chair, mortally wounded. Torresola turned his attention to plainclothes White House policeman Joseph Downs. Downs, who had just chatted with Coffelt, proceeded down the walkway to the basement door at the west end of the Blair-Lee house when he heard shots. Downs noticed Torresola, but he was shot in the hip before he could draw his weapon. Downs turned back towards the house, and was shot twice more by Torresola, once in the back and once in the neck. Downs staggered to the basement door, opened it, slid in, and then slammed the door behind him, denying Torresola entry into Blair House. Torresola turned his attention to the shoot-out between his partner, Collazo, and several other law enforcement officers. Torresola saw wounded policeman Donald Birdzell aiming at Collazo from the south side of Pennsylvania Avenue. Torresola aimed and shot Birdzell in the left knee from a distance of approximately 40 feet. Now shot in both knees, Birdzell was effectively incapacitated. (He would later recover.) Soon after, the severely wounded Collazo was hit in the chest by a ricochet shot from Davidson and was incapacitated too. Torresola stood to the immediate left of Blair House steps while he reloaded. At the same time, Truman, who had been napping in his second-floor bedroom, was awoken by the gunfire. Truman went to his bedroom window, opened it, and looked outside. From where he stood reloading, Torresola was 31 feet away from that window. It is unknown whether either man saw the other. At the same time, the wounded Coffelt staggered out of his guard booth, leaned against it, and aimed his revolver at Torresola, who was approximately 30 feet away. Coffelt fired, hitting Torresola two inches above the ear, killing him instantly. Coffelt himself died four hours later. Officer Coffelt's widow, Cressie E. Coffelt, was asked by the President and the Secretary of State to go to Puerto Rico, where she received condolences from various Puerto Rican leaders and crowds. Mrs. Coffelt always absolved the island's people of blame for the acts of the two gunmen. A plaque at Blair House commemorates Coffelt's sacrifice and heroism. The day room for the U.S. Secret Service's Uniformed Division at Blair House is also named for Coffelt.
Tags: Harry  Truman  assassination  attempt 
Added: 21st January 2011
Views: 2689
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 [7] 8 9 10 11 12 13 of 16 | Random