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Still The Perfect Season 1972 Miami Dolphins Tags: Still  The  Perfect  Season-  1972  Miami  Dolphins  NFL  New  England  Patriots  New  York  Giants 
Added: 4th February 2008
Views: 2042
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Posted By: Cliffy
Sandy Koufax SI Cover Sandy Koufax was named Sports Illustrated's Sportsman of the Year for 1965. Arm trouble caused Koufax to retire from baseball at the end of the 1966 season--a few months before his 31st birthday.
Tags: SI  cover  Sandy  Koufax 
Added: 30th July 2008
Views: 1113
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Posted By: Lava1964
Brady Bunch TV Guide Cover The Brady Bunch grace this cover of TV Guide. I'm assuming it's from 1970. The pictures are definitely from the first season (1969-70). One giveaway of the date is that Tiger the dog only appeared in a few episodes that first season--before he met his untimely death under the wheels of a florist's truck.
Tags: Brady  Bunch  TV  Guide 
Added: 27th August 2008
Views: 1713
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Posted By: Lava1964
Seattle Pilots The Seattle Pilots were an American League baseball club that lasted just one season--1969. This is the official team logo. The Pilots began play the same year as the Kansas City Royals, the San Diego Padres, and the Montreal Expos. The Pilots' owners were granted a team because they assured Major League Baseball a domed stadium would be built in Seattle within two years. That didn't happen. Instead they played at an antiquated minor league park called Sick's Stadium. The venue was so shoddy that seats were still being renovated on Opening Day. Visiting teams hated playing in Seattle because the ballpark's plumbing was horribly inadequate, forcing them to shower at their hotel. The stadium's toilets often failed when more than 10,000 people came to games. (That seldom happened; the Pilots drew just 677,944 fans for their 74 home dates. Still, the Pilots outdrew four other MLB clubs in 1969.) The team alienated potential supporters by having no local TV deal and charging as much as (gasp!) $6 per ticket--the highest price in MLB at the time. After finishing in last place in the American League West with a 64-98 record, and incurring losses of about $250,000, the team uprooted and moved to Milwaukee in 1970 and became the Brewers. Oddly enough, there is more interest in the Pilots now than when they were around. Mainly it is because of pitcher Jim Bouton's irreverent book, Ball Four.
Tags: Seattle  Pilots  baseball 
Added: 18th May 2009
Views: 1583
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Posted By: Lava1964
Chuck Cunningham Vanishes When Happy Days debuted in 1974, there were three Cunningham children: Joanie, Richie, and Chuck. Chuck, the eldest, was supposed to be a mentoring-type, college-age big brother to middle child Richie. The jockish Chuck's roles were small--so small that few viewers noticed that two different actors (Gavan O'Herlihy, shown in the photo; and Randolph Roberts) were cast as Chuck. By 1975, when the show went to live tapings and Fonzie became Richie's mentor, Chuck was simply dropped from the show with no explanation. He was only mentioned in one episode after the first season--and that was a flashback episode where his presence had to be explained. Several times in later episodes, Howard and Marion Cunningham both refer to having just two children. Tom Bosley, who played Howard, liked to joke in interviews that Chuck had 'accepted a full scholarship at the University of Outer Mongolia.'
Tags: Happy  Days  Chuck  Cunningham 
Added: 23rd October 2009
Views: 1687
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Bennett - Baseball Mascot A hunchback or dwarf was once considered by sports teams to bring good luck. Many professional baseball teams had such a mascot. Hunchbacks were considered particularly lucky. Many players rubbed the mascot's back before batting, believing a hit was sure to follow. Eddie Bennett was such an object of luck, but he also became much more to the teams he worked for. From the beginning of his life, Eddie Bennett seemed to catch bad breaks. A childhood accident left Eddie with a crippling back injury stunting his growth and leaving him hunchbacked and permanently child-sized. His life was further disadvantaged when both his parents perished in the 1918 influenza epidemic. Crippled and orphaned, things looked bleak for the young kid from Flatbush. Eddie was a big baseball fan and frequently hung around the Polo Grounds. Happy Felsch of the Chicago White Sox took notice of the boy. Impressed by his cheery demeanor, the Sox adopted Eddie as their good luck charm. Eddie travelled with the team and they won the 1919 AL pennant. Eddie returned to Brooklyn for the 1920 season--and Brooklyn won the NL pennant that year. During the 1920 World Series, after winning two out of three games at home, the team left Eddie behind when they went on the road to play Cleveland. Without their lucky charm they promptly lost four straight games and the best-of-nine series. Eddie, dejected and offended, left the team in disgust. In 1921 Eddie latched onto the New York Yankees. Although still a good luck charm, Eddie established himself as a true professional batboy. He not only performed the typical duties of batboy, he also handled other tasks, enabling the players to focus on the game. He was a paid employee of the Yankees and took his job very seriously. Eddie ran errands for the players, procured their favorite foods, and became their confidant. Eddie was privy to every rumor and scandal regarding the Yankees during the Roaring Twenties but he kept his mouth shut. When Urban Shocker was suffering from serious heart problems late in his career, he roomed with Eddie. He honored the pitcher's wishes and kept Shocker's health issues from his teammates. Babe Ruth in particular became close to Eddie. Ruth and Bennett would enter the field early in batting practice and perform a comical warmup show. The much larger Ruth would continually throw the ball out of Eddie's reach, eventually backing him up to the backstop. Not one Ruthian homerun went by without Eddie being the first to shake his hand upon touching home plate. If you look at any team picture from 1921 to 1932, there is Eddie, front and center with a big wide grin on his face, the envy of every boy in America. In the 12 seasons Eddie was with the Yankees, they won seven AL pennants and four World Series. All this changed early in 1932 when Ediie was hit by a taxicab, breaking his leg. Due to his other health problems the injury healed slowly. By the end of the year it was clear that Eddie's fragile health was failing. Unable to perform his duties with the Yankees, he was nevertheless financially supported by team owner Jacob Ruppert for his past services to his club. But not being around the team anymore and the severe pain he suffered daily because of the accident took its toll on Eddie. He began drinking heavily. He passed away in 1935 after a three-week bender, surrounded in his room by mounds of priceless memorabilia from his years as baseball's most famous batboy.
Tags: baseball  mascot  Eddie  Bennett  Yankees  hunchback 
Added: 22nd February 2011
Views: 2117
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Posted By: Lava1964
GI Joe Nurse Doll One of the most spectacular failures in toy history was the G.I. Joe Nurse figure. In 1967 Hasbro expanded its line of successful G.I. Joe toys. One was the G.I. Nurse Action Girl, a doll so rare that certain models in mint condition still in the box can bring up to $6,000 on todayís collectorsí market. 'The G.I. Joe Nurse is so valuable today because it was released for only one year,' says Sharon Korbeck, editorial director of Toy Shop, a biweekly magazine aimed at toy collectors. 'The figure didnít do very well. Boys werenít interested in a female doll, and girls werenít interested in anything related to G.I. Joe.' Sales also suffered because toy store managers didnít know how to position the doll. Some put her with the G.I. Joe action figures, while others stocked her next to Barbie and her friends. Either way, 50 percent of the prospective market was lost. There are actually two G.I. Joe Nurse figures: one has a dark-colored bag. The other has a white bag. An example of the rarer white-bag doll was highlighted on a season-four episode of Pawn Stars.
Tags: GI  Joe  nurse 
Added: 28th May 2011
Views: 16156
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Posted By: Lava1964
NFL Announcerless Telecast - 1980 "We are just moments away from the kickoff of today's Jets-Dolphins game and a telecast that figures to be different. The fact that we try something different--and dare to--has been greeted with almost every kind of reaction, from good-natured humor to applause to some surprising anger." That's how NBC's Bryant Gumbel's introduced what was about to happen on Saturday, December 20, 1980: NBC was going to broadcast an entire NFL game from Miami's Orange Bowl with neither a play-by-play announcer nor an analyst. It was a meaningless, season-ending game for two mediocre NFL teams, but Don Ohlmeyer (pictured here) turned it into a happening. Ohlmeyer was the first producer of Monday Night Football. He produced and directed three Olympics, won 16 Emmy awards, and is a member of the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame. Based on his years of experience, Ohlmeyer always believed that sports announcers talked too much. Here was an attention-seeking vehicle that would drive that point home. Ohlmeyer also thought the gimmick might be a way to boost ratings points out of an otherwise unattractive matchup. Dick Enberg, who was one of NBC's lead football announcers at the time, was not amused. He was worried. "My first reaction was of incredible nervousness," he recalled. "We're paid to talk, so all of us want to fill the air with lots of exciting words. We all gathered together, hoping that Ohlmeyer was dead wrong. I mean, he was flirting with the rest of our lives. What if this crazy idea really worked?" The game, won by the New York Jets 24-17, featured only sounds that could be picked up by on-field microphones, the referee's calls, plus the usual announcements from the Orange Bowl's stadium announcer. To compensate for the absence of TV announcers, NBC went overboard on its graphics and pre-recorded soundbites of players and coaches. It was a onetime experiment that was largely mocked by TV critics. Surprisingly, though, comments received at NBC's switchboard were about 60% favorable.
Tags: NFL  NBC  announcerless  telecast  Don  Ohlmeyer 
Added: 30th August 2011
Views: 2272
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Posted By: Lava1964
N.Y. Yankees Fire Red Barber - 1966 Red Barber was one of the great baseball broadcasters of all time. He began as the radio voice of the Cincinnati Reds in 1934. He became the Brooklyn Dodgers' lead broadcaster in 1939 and held that position until 1953 when he fell into disfavor with Dodger management over salary demands. The New York Yankees quickly hired Barber to work alongside Mel Allen beginning in 1954. The two men had contrasting styles but they meshed well together. Barber was the restrained southern gentleman while Allen was exuberant and bombastic. Barber's tenure with the Yankees ended suddenly at the end of the 1966 season--largely because he had the courage to report the truth. The Yankees, owned by CBS at the time, were a last-place team in 1966. During a home game on Thursday, September 22, only 413 fans were scattered around the cavernous ballpark to watch the Yankees play the visiting Chicago White Sox in a makeup game. The TV cameramen were under strict instructions from CBS media relations not to follow foul balls into the sea of empty seats. Barber, though, took it upon himself to paint the scene with words. "I don't know what the paid attendance is today," he said, "but whatever it is, it is the smallest crowd in the history of Yankee Stadium...and this crowd is the story, not the game." That game was the first for CBS executive Mike Burke as team president. A week later, Barber was invited to a breakfast meeting where Burke abruptly told him that his contract wouldn't be renewed for 1967. Barber was so stunned by the news that he rose from the table and left the restaurant without speaking. Barber had fully expected Burke to reaffirm his importance to a rebuilding team. Barber retired from sports broadcasting altogether. He died in 1992 at age 84.
Tags: Red  Barber  baseball  Yankees  fired  broadcaster 
Added: 21st September 2011
Views: 3573
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Posted By: Lava1964
Misfits of Science Misfits of Science was a short-lived NBC science fiction program. Only 15 episodes were made for the 1985-86 season--and just 14 aired--before it was cancelled due to low ratings. Misfits of Science featured young adults with unusual powers who were melded into a crime fighting unit. Among them was Dean Paul Martin (Dean Martin's son). He played Dr. Billy Hayes who organized the unit. Kevin Peter Hall, who was anywhere from 7'2" to 7'4" tall, played Dr. Elvin Lincoln who had the ability to shrink himself to a height of just six inches. A young Courteney Cox played juvenile delinquent Gloria Dinallo who possessed telekinetic powers. Here is the show's very strange opening montage.
Tags: Misfits  of  Science  NBC   
Added: 17th January 2014
Views: 1484
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Posted By: Lava1964

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