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Wacky Packs I remember these from when I was really young in the 1970s. They had stickers and my brother had them all over his mirror. I recently viewed an auction on ebay where complete pack sets go for thousands of dollars.
Tags: wacky  packs  topps  trading  card  sticker 
Added: 1st September 2008
Views: 1447
Rating:
Posted By: LPROUD
Its A Westinghouse the unique stove seen here is a circa 1920 Westinghouse Automatic Electric Range... the box above the burners on the stove as well as the clock sitting atop it was part of the original equipment: a mechanical device which apparently allowed for the "modern convenience" of pre-setting a specified time for the oven to turn on and off. "The Westinghouse Electric Range will enable you to shop or play or rest when you please, with the comfortable certainty that you will never find your dinner scorched or dried out, and that the finest flavors will be retained. Results are not only certain, but uniformly good, since the range, because of exact heat regulation, will always duplicate its happiest previous effort. The Westinghouse Automatic Electric Range is doing this kind of cooking for thousands of women, in kitchens that stay cool, at a cost for current more reasonable than you might expect, and with considerable savings in food weight."
Tags: westinghouse  Electric  Range 
Added: 6th November 2008
Views: 2408
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Posted By: Teresa
Hair Wiz Commercial 1974 One of those cheesy gadgets that was supposed to save you hundreds or thousands of dollars: Hair Wiz.
Tags: Hair  Wiz  commercial   
Added: 26th January 2009
Views: 2239
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Sands of Iwo Jima - Final Scene One of the best war movies ever made was The Sands of Iwo Jima (1949). Fittingly, the final scene was the famous flag-raising on Mount Suribachi.
Tags: Sands  of  Iwo  Jima  war  film 
Added: 21st July 2009
Views: 2415
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Hillsborough Disaster - 1989 One of the world's most senseless sporting disasters took place on Saturday, April 15, 1989 at Hillsborough Stadium in Sheffield, England. That afternoon 96 soccer fans were crushed to death before and during the early minutes of an FA Cup semifinal between Liverpool FC and Nottingham Forest FC. The stadium was a neutral site, but Liverpool had thousands more fans than Nottingham Forest who sought tickets. As is the custom, the two teams' fans were segregated. The Liverpool supporters were generally assigned standing-room tickets on the south terraces--enclosures surrounded by security fences. With the Liverpool terraces already dangerously overcrowded, the situation became exponentially worse when the police outside the stadium, fearing trouble, ordered an exit gate to be opened and 2,000 more fans rushed into the enclosures bypassing the turnstiles. The crush of the crowd caused fans already inside to be pushed and squeezed against the heavy metal fences and die of suffocation. Despite the constant pleas from fans for the police to open security gates to alleviate the pressure, the police on the other side of the fences did nothing. Some fans tried to escape by climbing into an upper deck. Others tried to scale the security fences. About six minutes into the match, the fans in the overcrowded terraces spilled over and through the fences causing the game to be stopped. Most of the fatalities died on the pitch without ever getting to a hospital. A coroner's report suggested that perhaps 40 of the fatalities could have been prevented with quick medical attention. Yet only two ambulances ever entered the stadium while others were stuck in a bottleneck outside the venue. Even with injured and dying fans being brought onto the pitch, most police officers were inexplicably more concerned with preventing rival Forest supporters from entering the field than assisting the injured. Initial reports wrongly blamed drunken and unruly fans for the catastrophe while exonerating the police's actions and inactions. Wildly inaccurate stories about fans pickpocketing the dead and interfering with rescue efforts were published in The Sun tabloid--a newspaper which is largely boycotted in Liverpool to this day. Later investigations indicated that a whitewash of the incident was orchestrated by the police, and rightly placed the blame on a paucity of law enforcement outside the stadium and a lack of police action when the situation on the terraces became dangerous. The ages of those killed ranged from 10 to 72. Eighty-nine of the 96 were males. One 10-year-old who died was the cousin of Steven Gerrard, who would later become Liverpool's captain. Terraces disappeared from most large British soccer venues shortly thereafter.
Tags: Hillsborough  disaster  England  soccer   
Added: 12th July 2014
Views: 2945
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
College Football Hoax 1941 In the autumn of 1941 many football fans began following the exploits of Plainfield (NJ) Teachers College. Too bad the school and its football team didn't really exist. It was an elaborate hoax that fooled hundreds of newspapers--even the New York Times' sports department--and thousands of college football fans. Stockbroker Morris Newburger and radio announcer Alexander (Bink) Dannenbaum concocted the idea of a mythical college football team. Using the name 'Jerry Croyden,' Newburger telephoned the New York City newspapers while Dannenbaum phoned the Philadelphia papers with fantastic stories of Plainfield's lopsided victories over nonexistent schools. With the newspapers printing Plainfield's scores week after week without question, Newburger and Dannenbaum got bolder. They began writing creative press releases about the new football powerhouse. One release praised Plainfield's star runningback, a 'full-blooded Chinese-American' sophomore named Johnny (The Celestial Comet) Chung. Chung's amazing abilities on the gridiron were credited to the handfuls of wild rice he ate during huddles. The Teachers' offense operated out of an innovative 'W' formation in which all the linemen but the center faced backwards. Colorful Hopalong Hobelitz was named as Plainfield's coach. Six weeks of spectacular Plainfield victories raised speculation that the team might secure a bid to a coveted bowl game. Curious journalist Red Smith of the Philadelphia Record journeyed to Plainfield to find the college. Of course, there wasn't one. Their fraud exposed, Newburger and Dannenbaum confessed--but only after Jerry Croyden issued one final bogus press release. It announced Plainfield was forfeiting its remaining games because Chung and several other players were declared academically ineligible after flunking their exams.
Tags: Plainfield  Teachers  College  football  hoax 
Added: 12th November 2009
Views: 4118
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Posted By: Lava1964
1999 Tennessee Roadkill Bill In March 1999 Tennessee's state legislature became the butt of jokes for debating a so-called 'Roadkill Bill.' The intent of the bill was to make animals killed on the state's highways the property of anyone who wanted the mangled carcasses, presumably for a meal. The bill stated, 'Wild animals accidentally killed by a motor vehicle may be possessed by any person for personal use and consumption.' Wrote one aghast New York Times columnist, 'In other words, it would be legal to eat roadkill. Legal to eat the thousands of squirrels, opossums, raccoons and rabbits that meet a painfully horizontal death every year beneath rubber tires. As if a state law were preventing anyone from scraping a happy meal off the asphalt. As if anyone would even dream of it.' In one of his Tonight Show monologues, Jay Leno comically suggested Tennessee's state motto ought to be changed to 'Fender-Licking Good.'
Tags: Tennessee  Roadkill  Bill  legislation 
Added: 2nd February 2011
Views: 4193
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Posted By: Lava1964
Niagara Falls Dries Up - 1848 The photo below is an aerial view of what Niagara Falls usually looks like. But for a period of about 40 hours on March 29-31, 1848 Niagara Falls stopped. No water flowed over the great cataract for the first time in recorded history. Not surprisngly people went a little nuts. Niagara Falls was already a big tourist attraction by 1848. Villages sprouted on both the U.S. and Canadian sides of the river to accommodate the sightseeing throngs. Residents also built waterwheels to harness the Niagara River’s power to run mills and drive machinery in factories. An American farmer out for a stroll shortly before midnight on March 29 was the first to notice something. Actually, he noticed the absence of something--the thundering roar of the falls. When he went to the river’s edge, he saw hardly any water. Came the dawn of March 30, people awoke to an unaccustomed silence. The mighty Niagara was a mere trickle. Mills and factories shut down because the waterwheels had stopped. The bed of the river was exposed. Fish died and turtles floundered about. Brave—or foolish— people walked on the river bottom, picking up exposed guns, bayonets and tomahawks as souvenirs. Was it the end of the world? Perhaps it was divine retribution for what some folks thought was a U.S. war of aggression against Mexico? In an age of religious revivals, theological explanations abounded. Fearing the end of the world, thousands of people filled special church services praying for the falls to start flowing and the world to continue, or for salvation and forgiveness of their sins as the Last Judgment approached. Because communications were haphazard in 1848, no one knew why the falls had stopped. But from Buffalo, NY word eventually arrived that explained the bare falls and dry riverbed. Strong southwest gale winds had pushed huge chunks of ice to the extreme northeastern tip of Lake Erie, blocking the lake’s outlet into the head of the Niagara River. The ice jam had become an ice dam. And just as news traveled inward, news also traveled outward. Thousands came from nearby cities and towns to look at the spectacle of Niagara Falls without water. People crossed the riverbed on foot, on horseback and in horse-drawn buggies. Mounted U.S. Army cavalry soldiers paraded up and down the empty Niagara River. It was a potentially hazardous act for there was no telling when the rushing waters might return. One entrepreneur used the hiatus to do some safety work. The Maid of the Mist sightseeing boat had been taking tourists on river rides below the falls since 1846, and there were some dangerous rocks it always had to avoid. Since the river had ceased running and the rocks were in plain sight, the boat’s owner sent workers out to blast the rocks away with explosives. March 30 was not the only dry day. No water flowed over the falls throughout the daylight hours of March 31. But that night a distant rumble came from upriver. The low-pitched noise drew nearer and louder. Suddenly a wall of water came roaring down the upper Niagara River and over the falls with a giant thunder. The ice jam had cleared. To the relief of the locals, the river was running again.
Tags: Niagara  Falls  dries  up  natural  history 
Added: 21st March 2011
Views: 3597
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Chick Stahl Mysterious Suicide - 1907 One of baseball's most peculiar mysteries was the suicide of Chick Stahl, the 34-year-old player-manager of the Boston Americans (later called the Red Sox), who took his own life on March 28, 1907 during spring training. Stahl's death by his own hand stunned the baseball world as Stahl was known as a happy-go-lucky fellow. The New York Times reported Stahl's death this way: WEST BADEN, Ind., March 29. — Charles Sylvester Stahl, known to baseball "rooters" throughout the country as "Chick" Stahl, the center fielder, and until two days ago the manager of the Boston American team, committed suicide in his room at the West Baden Springs Hotel by swallowing carbolic acid. He was dead when found. President Taylor of the club, who succeeded Stahl in the management of the team, immediately ordered the practice of the men stopped. When Stahl arose to-day he was in his usual good spirits. He shared his room with his eldest friend, ex-manager Jimmy Collins, and when the time came for going to practice, Stahl was not on hand. After waiting some time, Collins went to the room, and Stahl told him he had just drank some carbolic acid. In a few minutes he was in terrible agony, and to some of the members of the team who Collins called to the room Stahl said: "Boys, I couldn't help it; it drove me to it." The players did not know what their comrade meant, but they did know he was worried about something, as they had taken away a bottle of carbolic acid from him only a few days ago while the team was at Louisville, KY. (One unproven theory for Stahl's suicide claims that Stahl was being blackmailed by a woman who became pregnant by him. Stahl had gotten married just four months earlier. His widow died only a year after Stahl's suicide.) A friend in Fort Wayne, IN--where Stahl was laid to rest in a funeral attended by thousands--committed suicide in the same manner on March 30, adding another layer of intrigue to the mystery.
Tags: baseball  suicide  Chick  Stahl 
Added: 5th December 2011
Views: 2227
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Disco Demolition Night - 1979 Disco Demolition Night--one of baseball's most ill-conceived promotions--caused a rare MLB forfeit on July 12, 1979. It occurred at Chicago's Comiskey Park between games of a Thursday doubleheader between the hometown White Sox and visiting Detroit Tigers. Popular Chicago disc jockey Steve Dahl had been fired from radio station WDAI when he mentioned--on the air--that he listened to the album-oriented rock of rival station WLUP rather than his own station's fare--predominantly disco tunes. Dahl was subsequently hired by WLUP, known locally as "The Loop." The 1979 White Sox were a mediocre team struggling to attract decent crowds, so the team's management was willing to try anything to try to draw new fans. Dahl, in conjunction with Mike Veeck (son of then-White Sox owner Bill Veeck), devised a promotion: Anyone who brought a disco record to the ballpark would be admitted for just 98 cents. The records would be collected, placed in a large crate in center field, and blown up by Dahl between games. Dahl hyped the event on The Loop, hoping that 12,000 people might show up--double the typical Thursday attendance at Comiskey Park. The turnout exceeded all expectations. An estimated 90,000 people turned up at the 52,000-seat stadium. When the box office stopped selling tickets, thousands of people still got in by climbing over walls. It was an atypical baseball crowd to be sure. Broadcasters Harry Caray and Jimmy Piersall commented on the "strange people" wandering throughout the stands. When the crate was filled with records, stadium staff stopped collecting them. The "fans" who still had records soon realized they were shaped like frisbees. A few began to throw records from the stands during the game. After the first game, a 4-1 Tigers' win, Dahl, clad in army fatigues and a helmet, proceeded to center field. The crate containing the records was rigged with explosives. Dahl led the crowd in chants of "Disco sucks!" prior to triggering the explosion. When detonated, the explosives tore a hole in the outfield grass and a small fire began burning. Dahl triumphantly circled the warning track in a jeep before leaving the field. Once Dahl left, the White Sox started warming up for the second game, but thousands of fans rushed the field. Some lit more fires. Others pulled down the batting cage and wrecked it. Bases were stolen and chunks of the outfield grass were ripped away. Most trespassers wandered around aimlessly, though a number of participants burned banners, sat on the grass, ran from security and police and threw records into the air. Veeck and Caray used the PA system to implore the fans to vacate the field, but to no avail. Eventually the field was cleared by police in riot gear. Six people reported minor injuries and 39 were arrested for disorderly conduct. The field was so badly torn up that the umpires decided the second game could not be played. The next day American League president Lee MacPhail forfeited the second game to the Tigers on the grounds that the White Sox had not provided acceptable playing conditions. For the rest of the season, fielders complained about Comiskey Park's playing surface being substandard. No AL game has been forfeited since that night.
Tags: baseball  riot  disco  Comiskey  Park 
Added: 30th January 2012
Views: 5891
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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