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Celebrity Sweepstakes - Game Show Celebrity Sweepstakes was an NBC game show that aired from April 1, 1974 to October 1, 1976. It was hosted by Jim MacKrell. Here's how it worked: A panel of six celebrities was asked a trivia question. Before knowing the exact question but only the category, the members of the studio audience, through an electronic voting system, determined the odds of each panelist answering the question correctly by selecting whom they thought was most likely to give the correct answer. Based on those odds, the contestants wagered money on a celebrity and then found out if the bet was a good one. Celebrity Sweepstakes was originally slotted against Search for Tomorrow where it did not fare well against the popular CBS soap opera. It was then moved to 10 a.m. where it routinely bettered The Joker's Wild in the ratings. However, when CBS expanded The Price is Right to an hour, Celebrity Sweepstakes was blown away. For years it was believed all Celebrity Sweepstakes episodes had been erased by NBC, but obviously this one survived. This is the final eight minutes of the final show from October 1, 1976.
Tags: NBC  game  show  Celebrity  Sweepstakes 
Added: 3rd April 2013
Views: 1721
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pay TV questioned in 1954 Even back in 1954 TV Guide asked when we would pay for TV. They would be amazed at most cable bills today!
Tags: Martha  Raye  Pay  TV  cable  TV  television   
Added: 13th November 2013
Views: 1610
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Posted By: Cliffy
Hypnotist on WML Jackie Carroll, a fetching 18-year-old female hypnotist, is a contestant on the January 5, 1958 episode of What's My Line. Some of the questions she's asked can be interpreted rather salaciously if one had thoughts along those lines.
Tags: WML  female  hypnotist 
Added: 8th May 2015
Views: 2500
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Posted By: Lava1964
It Takes Two - Forgotten Game Show NBC came up with a new idea for a daytime game show in 1969 called It Takes Two. Three teams of celebrity couples participated. Each team member had to provide an independent numerical answer to a question asked by host...Vin Scully! (Scully is the greatest baseball announcer of all time; this point is not debatable.) Each team's two answers would be condensed to an average. A contestant, often located in an NBC studio in another city, would then guess which couple came closest to the true answer. If he/she were successful, a prize or cash would be awarded. It Takes Two debuted on March 31, 1969 and ran until July 31, 1970. Its airtime was supposed to be weekdays at 10 a.m. across the country, but many NBC affiliates shuffled it around on their schedules in favor of local programming. Here's a ten-minute clip from a 1970 episode. It Takes Two was briefly revived in 1997 on The Family Channel and was hosted by Dick Clark.
Tags: It  Takes  Two  NBC  game  show  Vin  Scully 
Added: 15th June 2015
Views: 1413
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Posted By: Lava1964
Chuck Davey - Boxings First TV Creation Chuck Davey, a slick left-handed boxer from Detroit who earned two degrees from Michigan State University, was the sport's first "television creation" in the early 1950s. Davey traveled to London as a member of the 1948 U.S. Olympic boxing team as an alternate but never competed in the Games. He turned pro in the late 1940s. At a time when boxing was hugely popular and it was possible to watch live televised pro bouts six nights per week, Chuck Davey fit the bill perfectly. He was good-looking, intelligent, popular enough be be pictured twice on the cover of The Ring magazine, and talented enough to win, but he possessed feather fists so his bouts often went the distance or close to it. (This pleased the networks and their sponsors as all the scheduled commercial breaks would be attained.) Over the years the quality of Davey's opposition has been questioned--and he certainly fought his share of tomato cans--but Davey did beat capable fighters such as Ike Williams, Carmen Basilio, and Rocky Graziano in his ascension up the ladder. After compiling 37 wins and two draws in his first 39 fights, Davey earned a shot at Kid Gavilan's world welterweight crown on February 11, 1953 in Chicago. Gavilan, who entered the ring as a 14-5 betting favorite, realized quickly that Davey had no ability to hurt him, so he just methodically wore Davey down. In the third round a flurry of punches knocked Davey down for the first time in his career. Over the next few rounds Gavilan toyed with Davey, occasionally switching to a southpaw stance just for the fun of it. In the ninth round, Gavilan floored Davey three more times. The fight was stopped by Davey's corner before round 10. Davey was pretty much discredited as a title threat after the bad loss to Gavilan. At one point he lost four out of five fights. He won two bouts in 1955 and then retired with an overall pro record of 42-5-2 with 26 knockouts. In 1998, Davey was paralyzed in a swimming mishap when a large ocean wave violently slammed him onto a beach. Davey died in 2002 at age 77.
Tags: boxing  Chuck  Davey  TV 
Added: 28th June 2015
Views: 1484
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The Monty Hall Problem In a 1990 issue of Parade Magazine, Marilyn vos Savant examined a question that was first posed to mathematicians in a statisticians' publication back in 1975. It was based on a situation that frequently came up on the TV game show Let's Make a Deal--thus it was dubbed the Monty Hall Problem in honor of the show's longtime host. Here's the situation: You are a contestant on Let's Make a Deal. You have to choose one of three doors numbered 1, 2, and 3. Behind one of the doors is a fabulous prize (a new car). Behind the other two doors are worthless prizes (a goat). Let's suppose you choose Door #1. Monty--who knows which door conceals the car--then opens Door #3 to reveal a goat. He asks you, "Do you want to change your choice of door to Door #2 or do you want to stick with Door #1?" One would think that either door is a 50:50 proposition--but that would be wrong. According to mathematicians, you have to consider the initial odds. By choosing Door #1 you had a 1/3 chance of picking the car and a 2/3 chance of picking a goat. Doors #2 and #3 offer a combined 2/3 chance of concealing the car. The fact that Door #3 is revealed does not change the original odds. It seems counterintuitive, but the math experts say you are better to make the switch to Door #2 as it will conceal the car 2/3 of the time.
Tags: logic  stats  mathematics  probability  Monty  Hall  Problem 
Added: 14th July 2015
Views: 1369
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Posted By: Lava1964
First Name of Lt Columbo During the long run that Peter Falk's beloved Columbo detective mysteries had on both NBC and ABC, Lt. Columbo's name was supposedly never revealed. In one episode, Columbo is asked if he has a first name. The detective coyly replied, "Only my wife uses it." However, Columbo's name was revealed in two NBC episodes via quick glances at his LAPD ID. In both Dead Weight and A Matter of Honor, Columbo's ID is shown onscreen just long enough for eagle-eyed viewers to see that it his first name is Frank. However, many trivia buffs wrongly believe Columbo's first name was Phillip. Why? Despite having zero evidence to back up his assertion, Fred L. Worth, the author of a trivia book, wrote that Columbo's first name was Phillip. This factoid was seized upon by the creators of Trivia Pursuit--and it appeared as a question in the first edition of the game. Worth attempted to sue the Trivial Pursuit people for copyright violation, but facts--even bogus ones--are not protected by copyright.
Tags: Columbo  first  name  Frank 
Added: 25th November 2017
Views: 1227
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Posted By: Lava1964
Thom McKee - Tic Tac Dough Champ Navy officer Lt. Thom McKee became a game show superstar in 1980 when he won the staggering sum of $312,700 in cash and prizes as a contestant on Tic Tac Dough, a syndicated quiz show. McKee, age 25, appeared in 46 episodes and played 89 games. He defeated 43 opponents and tied 45 games before losing to Erik Kraepeller. In total, McKee answered 353 questions correctly. During his remarkable undefeated/winning streak, his progress was often reported by mainstream news outlets--which was basically unheard of in 1980. McKee's list of prizes included eight cars (as winners on Tic Tac Dough were awarded a new car for every fifth win), three sailboats, 16 vacations (which he was unable to take), numerous other smaller prizes, and $200,000 in cash. McKee's win was especially noteworthy because most American game shows at the time had either limits on prizes or appearances. McKee discovered the fame is fleeting, however. Shortly after his run on Tic Tac Dough ended, McKee appeared on the short-lived reincarnation of To Tell The Truth. Only one of the three panelists was able to identify him as the real Thom McKee. McKee's record-setting winnings were not surpassed until the initial run of Who Wants to be a Millionaire ushered in the era of enormous game show prizes in 1999.
Tags: Thom  McKee  game  show  winner  Tic  Tac  Dough 
Added: 12th January 2018
Views: 1866
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Posted By: Lava1964
True Magazine True Magazine was a publication geared for the intelligent alpha-male demographic. It was published monthly from 1937 to 1974. A typical issue featured scholarly articles on sports, adventure, and general topics of interest to males. There were also regular humorous features and a question-and-answer section. Pictured here is the cover of the September 1956 issue.
Tags: True  magazine  men 
Added: 7th June 2018
Views: 903
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Posted By: Lava1964
10cc - I 'I'm Mandy, Fly Me' by Eric, Graham and Lol begins with the hook-line from 'Clockwork Creep' (on second album 'Sheet Music') and an airplane flying overhead before being swiped aside by a fat bass line, exotic synthesiser sound effects, a vocoder apparently whispering 'amazing grace' and whistling. We find out later that the airplane has crash-landed in the water, with the narrator thrown out of the plane (his first line is that he's 'on the outside looking in') but rather than sound petrified or angry, the narrator bobbing in the water is ecstatic. The poster he sees on the side of the aircraft, of an air-hostess named Mandy, 'with a smile as bright as sunshine' causes him to hallucinate (or so it seems) and takes him out of himself ('The world was spinning like a ball, and then it wasn't there at all!') Mandy gives him the 'kiss of life' that saves him, his addled brain setting off on a journey of exotic acoustic guitars and psychedelic effects that ends only when he's pulled from the wreckage; he asks for Mandy but she's not there. A love song to an imaginary person, created by a situation so intense and extreme that the 'real essence' of life comes into sharp contrast, 'Mandy' is balancing a lot of things for a humble catchy single. For a start we don't know who to believe: the narrator is clearly awake enough to realise that what's happening to him seems like a film (Mandy acts 'just like the girl in Dr No, no no no') and yet when he tells his rescuers later that it might have all been in his head they tell him 'no no no no' and that she was was real, yet currently missing - do they mean this? Or is that simply a ruse to keep him awake and conscious in the hope that the pair might be reunited? (note the sheer amount of denies in each of those two lines, the sort of things you do when you're lying to someone). The key line of this song is 'if your chance would you take it?' - would you be prepared to create a whole new life for yourself in your mind to keep yourself alive? And if you did, what would happen to you afterwards when you realised you were making it all up? It's interesting in this context that the band chose an 'air hostess' as their 'exotic woman' (the first in a whole sequence of imaginary confident Eric Stewart girls who'll end up seducing him on subways and all sorts in albums to come): air hostesses never seem quite real anyway, what with all that make-up and being made up to look the same. This clearly isn't a 'real' woman: she's the sort you see everywhere if you travel by plane a lot and even that name - Mandy - isn't a common one amongst 'real' people, though it's used a lot in books. The result is a fourth straight song in a row that's easy to admire and yet there's something difficult to fall in love with compared to earlier classic 10cc singles: there's too many questions and not enough answers for this to be an 'easy ride', with the sudden switch of gears every time the band break out for another instrumental making this song less easy on the ears than, say, 'I'm Not In Love' or 'Rubber Bullets'. Still, this is a lot of people's favourite 10cc song for a reason: its a love song told with such a radical twist that no one on first hearing could have heard it coming (if they'd understood it at all), traditionally loved by 'true' fans (although interestingly co-writer Lol Creme wasn't one of them; it was this song he quoted as evidence that the band were growing stale). In actuality 'Mandy' is a clever hybrid of catchy commercialism and bonkers uniqueness that couldn't possibly have been thought up by another band, but there are better mixtures of the same ingredients around, even on this same album.
Tags: 10cc,  Pop  Music,  Rock  Music,  1976 
Added: 11th August 2018
Views: 953
Rating:
Posted By: Maitlandsplace

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